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In This Issue
Arts Council Grants Awarded to 3 Libraries
Digital Wish Engages Students in Learning
UVM Libraries Receives NEH Grant
Vermonters Taking on Universal Class
Tanya Marshall Begins Work as State Archivist
Pew Internet on "Libraries, Patrons and e-Books"
Now Only One Materials Review Session
Book Discussion Sets: GMBA, DCF and More
VELI: Preschoolers and Math
Libraries Dream Big This Summer
Celebrate Teen Read Week
Select Award-Winning Books
Helpful Links
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VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
 
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topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarianThis past weekend I attended the Justin Morrill Symposium, sponsored by the Friends of the Morrill Homestead in Strafford. The Symposium was held to mark the 150th anniversary of Morrill's Land-Grant College Act and to discuss the legacy of that Act in terms of history, agriculture and higher education. The Morrill Act, signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, provided funds to states to purchase land and build colleges and universities across the nation. The University of Vermont became a land-grant institution in 1865. Morrill's Act prompted the creation of new programs of study in agriculture and "the mechanical arts" with the intent of making college education accessible to more Americans. Morrill had a bold vision, was a champion of equal opportunity (though education for women and African-Americans came later) and understood that access to knowledge is a necessary ingredient in building a healthy democracy. Morrill's vision - and his understanding of the importance of libraries as keepers of that knowledge - is certainly something to celebrate 150 years later.  Read more 

Arts Council Grants Awarded to 3 Libraries 
Three of Vermont's public libraries are among the 68 winners of Vermont Arts Council grants this month. The Bixby Memorial Library in Vergennes, the Blake Memorial Library in East Corinth and the Windsor Public Library are recipients of Cultural Facilities Grants.

 

All three libraries are making improvements to library structures. The grants are given to Vermont nonprofit organizations and municipalities to "enhance, create, or expand the capacity of an existing building to provide cultural activities for the public" and recipients receive between $1,000 and $30,000.

 

For more information on the grants and the newest grantees go to: http://www.vermontartscouncil.org/.

Digital Wish Engages Students in Learning 

For the past three years, Digital Wish, a partner in the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project, has been studying the process of
Woman helping child with computer 
Photo courtesy of Digital Wish
implementing one-computer-per-child (1:1) programs in rural schools in Vermont. Digital Wish is an educational non-profit on a mission to bring technology to American classrooms in order to prepare students to thrive in the global economy. As part of this federally-funded e-Vermont project, they delivered computers, held weekly educator trainings, offered a complete IT curriculum and provided training and support to 28 schools.  Their trainers modeled the entire process of technology adoption and progressively reduced the initiative planning time from 18 months to just 6 weeks, saving schools tremendous amounts of time and money. Both teachers and students are reporting a wide range of gains including increased engagement in learning, technological proficiency, and dramatic improvements in the understanding of internet safety issues.
Read more.

UVM Libraries Receives NEH Grant

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) notified the University of Vermont Libraries at the end of July that they had been awarded $300,000 in NEH funding to continue the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, Phase II (2012-2014) as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. Following the remarkable success of VTDNP Phase I, which will conclude on August 31 -- after having digitized nearly 130,000 pages of historical Vermont newspapers for the Library of Congress' Chronicling America database -- VTDNP Phase II will begin on September 1, 2012 and continue through August 31, 2014.  Phase II goals include ongoing "digitization of 100,000 pages of Vermont newspapers, issued in English, French, and Italian, dating from 1836 to 1922, as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP)." The Department of Libraries is a project partner.  

 

To read more about the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project go to: http://library.uvm.edu/vtnp/; and to see the digitized newspapers from Vermont and other states, go to the Library of Congress, Chronicling America website:http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/.

Vermonters Taking on Universal Class

Universal Class seems to be taking off in VT public libraries. The latest numbers show:  

Total Registered Users:

2,661

Total Login Sessions:

14,746

Total Courses Enrolled:

2,943

Total Lessons Completed:

8,406

Total Courses Completed:

292

Tanya Marshall Begins Work as State Archivist

Tanya Marshall became the State Archivist for the State of Vermont on Tanya Marshall State ArchivistAugust 1 following the retirement of Gregory Sanford, who served as state archivist for the past 30 years. In assuming this role, Marshall now directs the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration (VSARA), a division within the Office of Secretary of State. 

 

Marshall has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from the State University of New York at Geneseo and a Master in Library Science degree, with a concentration in archives, records and information management, from the University of Maryland, College Park. Read more

Pew Internet on "Libraries, Patrons and e-Books"

Librarians, library trustees and others who care about the future of libraries and who want a good picture of the current use of e-books among American library users will be interested in the June report of the Pew Internet and American Life Project: "Libraries, Patrons and e-Books." Read the full report at: http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2012/06/22/libraries-patrons-and-e-books/ 

Now Only One Materials Review Session

For many years DOL has presented a series of oral book review sessions of children's and young adult books for school and public librarians. At the height, there were four sessions at six locations around the state, a total of 24 each year. A series of changes in Vermont and the world (the Department of Education no longer has a school consultant to do half of the reviewing, budgets have gotten tighter, the web provides many other ways to get reviews, librarians have a harder time leaving their schools and libraries, and DOL had to slash the amount of time put into the project) have resulted in fewer and fewer people attending the programs. Read more.

Book Discussion Sets: GMBA, DCF and More

The Department of Libraries has many book sets to lend to libraries and schools that need multiple copies of books for classes or discussion groups. There are currently 188 titles in multiple copy ranging from titles for children such as Castle in the Attic (Elizabeth Winthrop) and 11 Birthdays (Wendy Mass) to YA offerings such as Ellen Hopkins' Crank to the adult Life of Pi (Yann Martel) and Persepolis (Marjane Satrapi).

 

Each year the Department of libraries buys 15 copies of each of the books nominated for the Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) as well as the Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) nominees currently in paperback. The ones on this year's DCF list that we now have are:
Read more.

VELI: Preschoolers and Math

The Vermont Early Literacy Initiative (VELI) is adding an earlyliteracy logo exciting new component to their programs which began with trainings on early literacy skills and concepts for babies and toddlers. In October librarians from twenty Vermont public libraries (selected from the original 30) will be trained in preschool literacy and mathematics skills, concepts and knowledge in a program called Ready for School. As with the original program for babies and toddlers, this research-based initiative will have a three pronged approach: read more

Libraries Dream Big This Summer

librarians pushing bookcard
Photo courtesy of St. Albans Library

Vermont libraries celebrated night and its wonders all summer long with the slogans of "Dream Big. Read" for children and "Own the Night" for teens. They held programs, invited stuffed animals to spend the night, encouraged children to read, and supported learning and investigation in many ways.

 

Here is a small sampling of activities across the state:

Fletcher Free in Burlington had a record-breaking summer with 1,375 kids participating. All together they read over 21,312 hours! How did they do all this? In addition to their fabulous staff, they had 44 volunteers and 27 contributors, a true community effort. Read more.  

Celebrate Teen Read Week, October 14-20

The theme for Teen Read Week this year is "It Came From the Library!" teenweekposter October2012 and the accompanying graphics are deliciously scary  Teen Read Week is a time to celebrate reading for fun and encourage teens to take advantage of reading in all its forms -books and magazines, e-books, audio books and more lurking in your library- and become regular library users.

 

Libraries planning to participate are urged to sign up on the American Library Association website at: http://teenreadweek.ning.com/.
  
Registration is free, and there are good programming and PR ideas. This is an excellent time to book-talk the books on the Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) list to get Vermont teens reading some fabulous books. For the GMBA titles and more information, go to:  http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/gmba.

Select Award-Winning Books
Now through Sept. 30, the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association, is collecting volunteer forms for individuals who want to serve on book award and selection committees operating between Feb. 1, 2013, and Jan. 31, 2014. Check out the free webinar to learn more about what it's like to serve on an award committee, and then access the volunteer form if you want to put your name forward for consideration.  Please direct questions to YALSA's President-Elect, Shannon Peterson, at shannon.peterson@gmail.com. Serving on book award committees is a lot of work, but is educational and terrifically satisfying.

ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

 

This past weekend I attended the Justin Morrill Symposium, sponsored by the Friends of the Morrill Homestead in Strafford. The Symposium was held to mark the 150th anniversary of Morrill's Land-Grant College Act and to discuss the legacy of that Act in terms of history, agriculture and higher education. The Morrill Act
,signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, provided funds to states to purchase land and build colleges and universities across the nation. The University of Vermont became a land-grant institution in 1865. Morrill's Act prompted the creation of new programs of study in agriculture and "the mechanical arts" with the intent of making college education accessible to more Americans. Morrill had a bold vision, was a champion of equal opportunity (though education for women and African-Americans came later) and understood that access to knowledge is a necessary ingredient in building a healthy democracy. Morrill's vision - and his understanding of the importance of libraries as keepers of that knowledge - is certainly something to celebrate 150 years later.

 

The Symposium included an outstanding roster of speakers, including John Merrow, an NPR and PBS education correspondent, and author of The Influence of Teachers: Reflections on Teaching and Leadership, who spoke passionately about the need in 2012 for a leader like Morrill to bring a bold new vision to our system of higher education (take a look at his 2005 documentary Declining by Degrees at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rplvn3h75rI), and Paul Ferguson, President of the University of Maine, who spoke about 21st century adaptations of Morrill's Land-Grant Act at his own university.

 

I was especially interested to hear from James Billington, historian and Librarian of Congress, who spoke about Morrill's life (son of a blacksmith who never himself attended college), his "mind-expanding" practice of reading, his work in Congress, and his role in the building of the magnificent Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress. Perhaps you have seen the bronze plaque inside the Library's main entrance which Billington unveiled in 1997: "As a member of Congress for 43 years, a member of the Senate Committee on Buildings and Grounds, a member of the Joint Select Committee on Additional Accommodations for the Library, and a champion of education, [Justin S. Morrill] played a vital role in obtaining this library building for the American people."

 

I left the symposium feeling a good dose of pessimism (the high cost of education which makes the dream of education impossible for so many; the impact of big agro-business on American agricultural policy) as well as some optimism (new programs at the Community College of Vermont which reach out to the most vulnerable Vermonters). But perhaps most of all I came away with an appreciation for the remarkable life and vision of Justin Morrill. His belief that knowledge is the key to democracy, personal enrichment and economic vitality - and that education must be open and available to all segments of American society, are also hallmarks of libraries and librarians. In an age when public funding for education is disappearing and information and sound bites are often touted as knowledge, I agree with Merrow that we need leaders and thinkers who can give us a modern-day bold vision for education - and, I would add, the future of libraries.

 

   

Regards,

   

Martha Reid

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digitalDigital Wish Engages Students in Learning

For the past three years, Digital Wish, a partner in the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project, has been studying the process of implementing one-computer-per-child (1:1) programs in rural schools in Vermont. Digital Wish is an educational non-profit on a mission to bring technology to American classrooms in order to prepare students to thrive in the global economy. As part of this federally-funded e-Vermont project, they delivered computers, held weekly educator trainings, offered a complete IT curriculum and provided training and support to 28 schools.  Their trainers modeled the entire process of technology adoption and progressively reduced the initiative planning time from 18 months to just 6 weeks, saving schools tremendous amounts of time and money. Both teachers and students are reporting a wide range of gains including increased engagement in learning, technological proficiency, and dramatic improvements in the understanding of internet safety issues.  

 

In July Digital Wish released the results of a survey given to over 400 teachers and students who participated in the School Modernization Initiative. Survey respondents collectively reported dramatic improvements in their 21st century technology skills, and teachers reported that student engagement in learning was their biggest benefit. The importance of these survey results is two-fold: (1) the data can help schools secure funding for technology, and (2) raising student engagement in learning opens new doors and new opportunities.  Project Director Heather Chirtea encourages school librarians to read and use the study for planning and "modernization" efforts, and to use the data in reports and grant applications. The Survey results are available at: http://www.digitalwish.com/dw/digitalwish/news?id=173


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universalVermonters Taking on Universal Class

Universal Class seems to be taking off in VT public libraries. The latest numbers show:

Total Registered Users:

2,661

Total Login Sessions:

14,746

Total Courses Enrolled:

2,943

Total Lessons Completed:  

8,406

Total Courses Completed:

292

 

Compared to the numbers we reported in our December 2011 Newsletter we have seen

An increase of 2,548 in Total Registered Users, up 96%

An increase of 10,551 in Total Login Sessions, up 72%

An increase of 1,972 in Total Courses Enrolled, up 67%

An increase of 6,146 in Total Lessons Completed, up 73%

An increase of 236 in Total Courses Completed, up 81%

 

There has not been much dramatic change in the top ten courses. However, the change of seasons may have been the cause of Knitting Basics' drop from #10 to #21. For the rest of the courses there was some up and down movement of a place or two. Computer Basics 101 remains the top course; Digital Photography has moved up from #4 to #2; How to Draw 101, Excel 2007 and Nutrition 101 remain at #3, 5 and 8 respectively, while Accounting and Bookkeeping 101 has dropped from #2 to #4; Adobe Photoshop has moved from #7 to #6; QuickBooks 101 made its first appearance on the top ten; and Medical Terminology fell from #9 to #10.

 

1. Computer Basics 101

2. Digital Photography 101

3. How To Draw 101

4. Accounting & Bookkeeping 101 for Everyone

5. Excel 2007

6. Adobe Photoshop 101

7. How to Take an Online Course at UniversalClass

8. Nutrition 101

9. Quickbooks 101

10. Medical Terminology 101

 


tanyaTanya Marshall Begins Work as State Archivist

Tanya Marshall became the State Archivist for the State of Vermont on August 1 following the retirement of Gregory Sanford, who served as state archivist for the past 30 years. In assuming this role, Marshall now directs the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration (VSARA), a division within the Office of Secretary of State.

 

Marshall has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from the State University of New York at Geneseo and a Master in Library Science degree, with a concentration in archives, records and information management, from the University of Maryland, College Park. She has also completed coursework for a Ph.D. in Information Science, also at the University of Maryland.

 

While pursuing her M.L.S. degree, Marshall held assistantships with the National Archives and Records Administration and the Smithsonian Institution and coordinated the Maryland-Chinese Local Archives Exchange Program and organized workshops, training, study tours, and conferences for visiting Chinese archivists. She was also employed as a cataloger of rare books, archives, and special collections by the Technical Services Department of the University of Maryland University Libraries System. Later, Marshall was a teaching assistant for the Archives, Records and Information Management Program within the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park and worked part-time as a reference librarian for the Prince George's County (Md.) Memorial Library System.

 

Marshall began her career in Vermont as a project archivist in 2003 and was promoted to Assistant State Archivist in 2005. She chaired the Vermont Municipal Land Records Commission and served on the Vermont Web Portal Board. Between 2004 and 2005, she was also employed by the Vermont Court Administrator's Office as a records management consultant and coordinated the Vermont Judicial Records Program. In May 2008, she was recognized as an "outstanding state employee for her commitment, talent and leadership in public service" by the State of Vermont.

 

In July 2008, Marshall assumed the titles of Senior Records Analyst and Deputy State Archivist after authority and oversight of the State's records management program was transferred from the Department of Buildings and General Services to VSARA. She most recently supervised the Records Analysis and Policy Unit, which is responsible for the appraisal and scheduling of public records. Marshall serves on the Vermont SharePoint Governance Board and the Advisory Committee on the Rules to Public Access to Court Records.

 

In July 2012, she was elected by her peers as vice president the National Association of Government Archives & Records Administrators (NAGARA). Her fellow state archivists also elected her to the Council of State Archivists' (CoSA) Board of Directors. In addition to NAGARA and CoSA, Marshall serves on the ARMA International Standards Development Program's RIM Review Group and San Josť State University's Master's in Archives and Records Administration (MARA) Program Advisory Committee.

 

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nowNow Only One Materials Review Session

For many years DOL has presented a series of oral book review sessions of children's and young adult books for school and public librarians. At the height, there were four sessions at six locations around the state, a total of 24 each year. A series of changes in Vermont and the world (the Department of Education no longer has a school consultant to do half of the reviewing, budgets have gotten tighter, the web provides many other ways to get reviews, librarians have a harder time leaving their schools and libraries, and DOL had to slash the amount of time put into the project) have resulted in fewer and fewer people attending the programs.

 

Many people do watch the recording on RETN, and the bibliography is downloaded a lot, so we know that the service is still important, and for some, there is no substitute for being able to see and handle the books before they order. So, a compromise:  we are now going to have only one session. The fall program will be held on Wednesday, October 10, at the Brown Public Library in Northfield, and will, as always, begin at 9:00a .m.. RETN will continue to videotape the sessions; the recording will stream on their website and the bibliography will be on the DOL website, so everyone will still have access to all the information.

 

Those who have never attended a Materials Review session are invited to go to the one on October 10 to see what it is all about. Grace Greene, the Youth Services Consultant, wil review approximately 75 books orally, from picture books through young adult, and all the books will be there to examine. In addition to the ones she reviews orally, there will be a couple of hundred other books that are reviewed favorably either by the review media or by volunteer Vermont reviewers, as well as the newest books in the professional collection of the Children's Book Exhibit Center.

 

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setsDiscussion Sets from DOL: GMBA, DCF and More

The Department of Libraries has many book sets to lend to libraries and schools that need multiple copies of books for classes or discussion groups. There are currently 188 titles in multiple copy ranging from titles for children such as Castle in the Attic (Elizabeth Winthrop) and 11 Birthdays (Wendy Mass) to YA offerings such as Ellen Hopkins' Crank to the adult Life of Pi (Yann Martel) and Persepolis (Marjane Satrapi).

 

Each year the Department of libraries buys 15 copies of each of the books nominated for the Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) as well as the Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) nominees currently in paperback. The ones on this year's DCF list that we now have are:  

Bauer    Close to Famous

Davies   The Lemonade Crime

Giff       R My Name is Rachel

Howe    Addie on the Inside

Pyron    A dog's Way Home

Smith    Storm Runners

Van Draanen The Running Dream

 

By the end of September, four more DCF titles will come out in paperback (City of Orphans, Waiting for the Magic, The Flint Heart and The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman), so they will be added to the collection.

 

Libraries must request the books on the CURRENT GMBA and DCF lists directly from Linda Willis-Pendo at  linda.willis-pendo@state.vt.us. They go out for a 45 day loan period and may be reserved ahead.

Libraries may borrow all other discussion books by requesting them through interlibrary loan. For each title desired, send one Web2 request to lib.ill@state.vt.us. State the number of copies needed in the "comments" box. Discussion books circulate for 60 days.

 

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VELIVELI: Preschoolers and Math 

The Vermont Early Literacy Initiative (VELI) is adding an exciting new component to their programs which began with trainings on early literacy skills and concepts for babies and toddlers. In October librarians from twenty Vermont public libraries (selected from the original 30) will be trained in preschool literacy and mathematics skills, concepts and knowledge in a program called Ready for School. As with the original program for babies and toddlers, this research-based initiative will have a three pronged approach: storytimes for the children; programs for families to teach them how to do simple math and literacy activities at home with their kids; and training for local childcare providers. The program will also incorporate the Vermont Early Learning Standards and new Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Mathematics and emphasize their importance when it comes to appropriate programming for children ages three to five. The Vermont Center for the Book is a leader in the field of math and science programming for preschoolers, having recently completed a highly successful four year national project with public librarians nationwide, funded by the National Science Foundation.


VELI, a joint project of the Department of Libraries  and the Vermont Center for the Book, is based on research on how babies, toddlers and preschoolers learn. The project is made possible by a generous donation by Dr. Burnett Rawson from the Winnie Belle Learned Fund of the Vermont Public Library Foundation, and through a grant obtained by VCB from the Henderson Foundation.

 

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dreamLibraries Dream Big This Summer

Vermont libraries celebrated night and its wonders all summer long with the slogans of "Dream Big. Read" for children and "Own the Night" for teens. They held programs, invited stuffed animals to spend the night, encouraged children to read, and supported learning and investigation in many ways.

Here is a small sampling of activities across the state:

 

Fletcher Free in Burlington had a record-breaking summer with 1,375 kids participating. All together they read over 21,312 hours! How did they do all this? In addition to their fabulous staff, they had 44 volunteers and 27 contributors, a true community effort.

 

In Springfield, brave children who dream of becoming naturalists came face to face with a snapping turtle at the Springfield Town Library thanks to a program entitled "Turtles of Vermont" presented by Michael Clough of the Southern Vermont Natural History Museum in July.  They also cheered on a race between a painted turtle and a box turtle.  The box turtle was the clear winner as the painted turtle hid in his shell. 

 

Librarian Debbie Landauer in Fairfax had programs on astronomy, music, turtles (apparently a rising trend), origami and pottery-something for everyone.

 

Craftsbury had an all night readathon which was a highlight of the summer for many of their teen/tween patrons.

 

In Colchester, teens had fun learning how to paint henna designs, "artifying" (as one teen called it) paper lanterns and then stringing them with mini-LED lights in their choice of colors. Their annual YA Foodie competition was called "Midnight Snack" this year and produced some delicious flavor combinations for the staff and student judges to taste-test.  Contestants could make a sweet, salty or wild card snack with basic library-furnished food ingredients and up to three of their own.  The winner did a pretzel-chocolate-honey combo.  And they had another successful teen LockIn with 18 teens, four adults, too much food, a lot of glitter, howling, flashlights, and a memorable dance scene.

 

Norwich had a "Come to the Library in your Pajamas Day." They had milk and cookies and photographed everyone either in a little bed or in front of a headboard. They also had a basket on hand filled with pjs, robes and nightgowns. It was a fun day, and one they would do again. The staff especially enjoyed spending the day in their pajamas.

 

A couple of stories to round out the fun:

From Rutland: From a 12-year-old girl who was astounded by the glow-in-the-dark drinks. (Put a glow stick bracelet in bottom of large cup, cover with smaller clear plastic cup, pour in water or clear soda, drink in the dark.)--"Wow, I never knew libraries could be so much fun. I'm definitely coming back."

 

From a 10-year-old boy as he checked out a tall stack of books, "This is the best day of my life."

 

And, finally, from Kellogg Hubbard, Montpelier:

When Senator Leahy was at the library promoting the movie Dark Knight, they had Batman there as well.  They repeatedly called Senator Leahy "Our" favorite superhero.  One of the story time kids apparently took that to heart.  When his mother took him to the store to get brand new "superhero" underwear now that he's using the potty, she asked him which superhero he wanted.  His response was "Senator Leahy underwear" because he's a real live superhero, not the kind in books.

 

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