kidsinlibraries
     
In This Issue
Sign Up for Library Advocacy Training
Scholarships Awarded to attend ARSL
Grant Award for Bolton's Own Little Libraries
School Literacy Grant Opportunity
New Look, New Name for VOL's Business
Katherine Paterson @ Camp
Happy Birthday Dr. Rawson!
The Top 3 OneClick Digital Books
New in the Library Science Collection @ The State Library
Helpful Links
Department of Libraries

VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
 
VCAL GMLC

VT Folklife Center 
Join Our Mailing List

topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

As many of you know, the Department of Libraries has been deep in "planning mode" for the past year. We released the Independent Evaluation of our LSTA 5-Year Plan, 2008-2012 in March http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/VTLSTAEvaluation2008-2012.pdf and completed our new state Strategic Plan in May. http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files
/finaldolstrategicplan062012.pdf

 

At the end of June we submitted our new federal LSTA Five-Year Plan, 2013-2017 http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/Vermont%20LSTA%20Plan%202013-2017%20%282%29.pdf and are awaiting approval from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), expected by October.

 

Both of our new (state and federal) plans are ambitious and, though there is some overlap in the goals included in these two documents, they each are in alignment with the goals and missions of two separate governmental entities: (1) the State of Vermont and (2) the federal IMLS. They also address the interests and needs of our many stakeholders, in particular the Vermont citizens who use the services of our school, public and academic libraries. Read more

Sign Up for Library Advocacy Training  

Are you an effective advocate for your library? Do you know how to identify a good story and then effectively use it? Do you build strong partnerships within your community? Is your library telling the community what makes you special? Do you need some help in doing this better?

 

Turning the Page is a 6-week, online training for library supporters, whether staff, trustees or library friends. Meeting online for one hour and then preparing before and after the class each week, participants build a real advocacy plan over the 6 weeks. Created by the Public Library Association and sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the training goal is to strengthen public libraries through effective advocacy skills. Read more

Scholarships Awarded to attend ARSL  

The Department of Libraries is pleased to announce that two Vermont public library directors will receive a scholarship from the Department to attend the 2012 Conference of the Association for Rural and Small Libraries in Raleigh, NC, in September.

 

Sarah Costa, Director of Calef Memorial Library in Washington, and Margaret Woodruff, Director of Charlotte Public Library in Charlotte, will attend the conference and will bring what they learn back to the state of Vermont to share with others. Read more.

Grant Award for Bolton's Own Little Libraries

littlefreelibrary box 
Pic courtesy of LittleFreeLibrary. org

Steve Madden, the Librarian at Camels Hump Middle School, has a passion for connecting kids and books. Seven years ago he recognized the need for young readers who live in Bolton to have better access to books during the summer vacation, and he implemented a "bookmobile" service in town. Bolton does not have its own public library, but the picture changed this year with the introduction of "Little Libraries" springing up throughout town, providing local residents free access to books. It's a great project, inspired by a similar project in Wisconsin. To support the project in Bolton, the Department of Libraries has awarded a grant of $2500 to the Bolton's Own Little Libraries (BOLL) program. Is this a solution for other rural communities in Vermont that lack a public library of their own? We don't know, but we are interested in watching what happens in Bolton. Congratulations to Steve and residents of Bolton! We are inspired by what you have accomplished. To read more, see http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/article/20120718/NEWS07/307180007/Bolton-s-little-libraries-on-posts-replace-bookmobile and the BOLL Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/217540608350423/

School Literacy Grant Opportunity  

The application filing period for Innovative Approaches to Literacy Program (IAL) school literacy grants is now open, the US Department of Education announced today in the Federal Register. School librarians are encouraged to apply for the program grants, which can range from $150,000-750,000. At least 50 percent of the $28.6 million is designated for school librarians. The deadline to apply for the grant funding is August 10, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. EST. Read more.

New Look, New Name for VOL's Business

GALE Database for business logo

The Vermont Online Library, a collection of subscription-based information databases, made available to students and citizens via their school, academic and public libraries, includes a variety of databases from Gale, including the Business & Company Resource Center, a tool that provides detailed company and industry news, data and trends. In mid-August this product will be updated with a new interface that provides a fresh new look, and includes the ability for users to create and download charts and tables. The database name is also changing, to Business Insights: Essentials. Read more. 

Katherine Paterson @ Camp

 Kpatersonandblinkids Noted children's and young adult author Katherine Paterson met with many of the youngest patrons of the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, part of the Department of Libraries (DOL) Special Services Unit (SSU) at a special event in June. The kids, ranging in age from 5 to 18, were at Camp Hochelaga in South Hero during the independent living skills camp run by the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The older youth were there as mentors to the younger ones. Paterson's visit was an unusually calm spot in the midst of archery, horseback riding, kayaking, rock climbing, and other traditional camp activities, altered only slightly for the visually-impaired. The kids prepared for Paterson's visit by watching the movie version of Bridge to Terabithia, and they asked Paterson questions about the story and how she came to write it. Paterson related some of her own childhood experiences in which she felt like an outsider and was bullied. She also read a passage from her friend Jean Little's memoir, Little by Little: A Writer's Education. Little is a well-known Canadian children's author, and is visually-impaired. Many of Paterson's and Little's books are available in large print, audio, and braille. Accompanying her on the visit to camp were DOL's Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene, and SSU head Teresa Faust. This is the first event SSU has held for its younger readers.

Happy Birthday Dr. Rawson!

Dr.RawsonandkidsinDanvilleVT Dr. Burnett Rawson, founder and benefactor of the Winnie Belle Learned Fund (Vermont Public Library Foundation) turned 99 years old on July 11. And how did he celebrate on his big day? By visiting some Vermont public libraries! Accompanied by Tom Smith of the Vermont Community Foundation, Dr. Rawson visited the public libraries in Marshfield, Danville, Hyde Park, and Montgomery. He and Tom Smith make surprise visits throughout the year to libraries that have received grants from the Winnie Belle Learned Fund.

 

This year it was not just the library staff at these locations who were surprised! At the Pope Memorial Library in Danville, the children who were attending a library program gave him a big welcome and sang a rousing rendition of "Happy Birthday to You."  Our thanks to Library Director Dee Palmer for making this happen. Read more. 

The Top 3 OneClick Digital Books 

The first circulation figures from OneClick Digital, the downloadable audio book service brokered by the Department of Libraries and offered through 43 Vermont public libraries, have come in. Here are the books downloaded the most.

 bookjacketjunkyardJunkyard Dogs: A Walt Longmire Mystery, by Craig Johnson

This is Johnson's sixth mystery featuring laconic Wyoming sheriff Walt Longmire, and it garnered a starred review from Booklist. In this installment, Longmire deals with housing developers and the cantankerous Stewart clan which owns the junkyard next to the development. This title managed to have the most downloads in Vermont's OneClick, even though it has been available only a few weeks, coinciding with the debut of a drama series called Longmire, airing on the A&E TV network. All 6 Longmire books are available on OneClick. Read more


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

As many of you know, the Department of Libraries has been deep in "planning mode" for the past year. We released the Independent Evaluation of our LSTA 5-Year Plan, 2008-2012 in March http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/VTLSTAEvaluation2008-2012.pdf and completed our new state Strategic Plan in May. http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files
/finaldolstrategicplan062012.pdf

 

At the end of June we submitted our new federal LSTA Five-Year Plan, 2013-2017 http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/Vermont%20LSTA%20Plan%202013-2017%20%282%29.pdf and are awaiting approval from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), expected by October.

Both of our new (state and federal) plans are ambitious and, though there is some overlap in the goals included in these two documents, they each are in alignment with the goals and missions of two separate governmental entities: (1) the State of Vermont and (2) the federal IMLS. They also address the interests and needs of our many stakeholders, in particular the Vermont citizens who use the services of our school, public and academic libraries.

 

So let's look a little closer at our new LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) Five-Year Plan. LSTA funds come to us via the "Grants to States Program" in an annual appropriation from IMLS that is spent over a two-year period. In FFY2012, IMLS awarded $156,365,300 to the library agencies in 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 6 U.S. territories. Vermont received $919,668, which represents a bit less than a third of our annual operating budget.* The LSTA appropriation varies each year, but is determined by a formula based on the state's population, and the use of these funds follows the LSTA Priorities and Purposes set in federal law. In addition, this year IMLS presented us with "focal areas" and urged states to address all or part of these in their new LSTA Plans. These include (in part): Workforce Development, Building Capacity of Local Libraries, Civic Engagement for Citizens and Lifelong Learning. Our Plan addresses several of these focal areas with an emphasis on strengthening linkages and networks that support citizen access to library resources and services, another area of interest for LSTA funding.

 

A particular challenge for us as we implement these plans will be measuring our success.   What are the desired outcomes for the activities that will engage us over the next 5 years? How do we measure the impact of what our Department does on Vermont libraries and their ability to provide service to their constituents? And how do we measure the impact of these library services for our students and citizens? As a government agency we are accountable to taxpayers and we need to be able to show that the work we do - and the work that takes place every day in our libraries - makes a difference in the lives of our citizens. Simply put, what is the "bang for buck?" Librarians KNOW that libraries transform lives. We see it in the faces of children learning to read or who attend storytime programs, in seniors who engage in programming that enriches their lives. We know it from the job-seeker who uses a library computer and the student who encounters a primary source for the first time or who gets excited about a piece of research. To capture this information (both data and stories) - and to show the results of the work outlined in our strategic plans - will require us to develop and use new techniques and tools.  

 

We have a lot of work to do and we are excited about the task ahead as we work with libraries and other stakeholders to accomplish our goals. As always, I encourage your comments and questions.You can reach me directly at: martha.reid@state.vt.us

_____

*Our FY13 budget includes $2,401,244 in state general funds; $815,264 in LSTA funds; $126,425 in special (restricted) funds; and $103,395 in other funds (including monies collected from libraries for membership in the Vermont Online Library.) For more info, see: http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/LIB.pdf

 

 

Regards,

   

Martha Reid

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signSign Up for Library Advocacy Training

Are you an effective advocate for your library? Do you know how to identify a good story and then effectively use it? Do you build strong partnerships within your community? Is your library telling the community what makes you special? Do you need some help in doing this better?

 

Turning the Page is a 6-week, online training for library supporters, whether staff, trustees or library friends. Meeting online for one hour and then preparing before and after the class each week, participants build a real advocacy plan over the 6 weeks. Created by the Public Library Association and sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the training goal is to strengthen public libraries through effective advocacy skills.

 

Whether there is an immediate goal to address, such as a fundraising or capital campaign, or need to strengthen the ability of the library team to communicate with the community, this is a terrific opportunity and the last of the scheduled trainings, running from the week of September 24 to the week of October 29, 2012.

 

Prior to this series, a Vermont Kickoff is scheduled for September 12 in Berlin, 10:00 am to 12:00 pm. The kickoff will place the training into a Vermont context and will present the online classroom so participants are comfortable with the technology portion and can better focus on the content of the class.

 

Libraries that can do so are encouraged to take this training as a team. The more of library staff, trustees, volunteers and Friends who are advocacy-savvy, the easier it is to share the library's message with its community. Each person registers independently and can schedule the online time around his or her own schedule.

 

Register for Turning the Page, starting August 15 at www.ala.org/pla/education/turningthepage. To attend the Vermont Kickoff on September 12, contact Christine Friese, 802-828-2714 or christine.friese@state.vt.us.

 

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ARLS Scholarships Awarded to attend ARSL

The Department of Libraries is pleased to announce that two Vermont public library directors will receive a scholarship from the Department to attend the 2012 Conference of the Association for Rural and Small Libraries in Raleigh, NC, in September.

 

Sarah Costa, Director of Calef Memorial Library in Washington, and Margaret Woodruff, Director of Charlotte Public Library in Charlotte, will attend the conference and will bring what they learn back to the state of Vermont to share with others.

 

Applicants for the scholarship serve populations under 10,000 and were from libraries meeting Minimum Standards for Vermont Public Libraries. The conference will offer workshops and keynote addresses focused entirely on the needs of small and rural libraries as well as the chance to meet and talk with librarians from other small libraries across the country.

 

The conference is held annually and this year the 3-day conference includes keynote addresses by Susan Hildreth, Director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services; mystery writer and North Carolinian Margaret Maron; and Dr. Ron Carlee, Chief Operating Officer of ICMA (International City/

County Management Association). More information on the conference can be found at arsl.info/category/conference2/.

 

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schoolSchool Literacy Grant Opportunity 

The application filing period for Innovative Approaches to Literacy Program (IAL) school literacy grants is now open, the US Department of Education announced today in the Federal Register. School librarians are encouraged to apply for the program grants, which can range from $150,000-750,000. At least 50 percent of the $28.6 million is designated for school librarians. The deadline to apply for the grant funding is August 10, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. EST.


The literacy grant program is designed to support innovative literacy programs for young children, increase student achievement by using school libraries and motivate older children to read. According to the Department of Education, the grants are to be used to "develop and improve literacy skills for children and students from birth through 12th grade within the attendance boundaries of high-need local educational agencies."


Local education agencies can use the funding to support school libraries and purchase materials. The US Department of Education highlighted the need for school libraries in the literacy efforts in the program announcement: Many schools and districts across the nation do not have school libraries that deliver high-quality literacy programming to children and their families. Additionally, many schools do not have qualified library media specialists and library facilities. Where facilities do exist, they are often underresourced and lack adequate books and other materials. In many communities, high-need children and students have limited access to appropriate age- and grade-level reading material in their homes.


To get tips on how to apply for the literacy grant program, visit the ALA Innovative Approaches to Literacy
application guide webpage.

 

Please note: All interested parties must be registered for federal grants in advance to apply for program grants.

 

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GALENew Look, New Name for VOL's Business

The Vermont Online Library, a collection of subscription-based information databases, made available to students and citizens via their school, academic and public libraries, includes a variety of databases from Gale, including the Business & Company Resource Center, a tool that provides detailed company and industry news, data and trends. In mid-August this product will be updated with a new interface that provides a fresh new look, and includes the ability for users to create and download charts and tables. The database name is also changing, to Business Insights: Essentials.

 

In preparation for this upgrade, the Department of Libraries will offer two online training sessions for libraries with Gale trainer Stacey Knibloe.

 

Business Insights: Essentials for Vermont Online Library

Friday, August 17, 2:00-3:00

 

Business Insights: Essentials for Vermont Online Library

Friday, August 24, 10:00-11:00

 

For general information on the new look, see www.cengagesites.com/Literature/782/gale-business-insights-global-essentials/ . To see a listing of Vermont libraries that subscribe to the Vermont Online Library, see www.vtonlinelib.org.

 

In addition to our Vermont-focused training, Gale also schedules generalized training for all Gale subscribers. In August they include three sessions on Business Insights: Essentials as well as other Gale databases. Gale's training calendar is at www.calendarwiz.com/calendars/calendar.php?crd=cengagegale&.

 

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drHappy Birthday Dr. Rawson!

Dr. Burnett Rawson, founder and benefactor of the Winnie Belle Learned Fund (Vermont Public Library Foundation) turned 99 years old on July 11. And how did he celebrate on his big day? By visiting some Vermont public libraries! Accompanied by Tom Smith of the Vermont Community Foundation, Dr. Rawson visited the public libraries in Marshfield, Danville, Hyde Park, and Montgomery. He and Tom Smith make surprise visits throughout the year to libraries that have received grants from the Winnie Belle Learned Fund.

 

This year it was not just the library staff at these locations who were surprised! At the Pope Memorial Library in Danville, the children who were attending a library program gave him a big welcome and sang a rousing rendition of "Happy Birthday to You."  Our thanks to Library Director Dee Palmer for making this happen. State Librarian Marty Reid attended an evening birthday dinner in Dr. Rawson's honor, and he expressed delight at what the children had done. (And he also wondered ... how did they know it was my birthday?!? We're not telling.)

 

Dr. Rawson created the Winnie Belle Learned Fund in 2007 to honor Winnie Belle Learned, a Vermonter, educator, and his benefactress.  Ms. Learned was born in 1863 and was a teacher and principal in Massachusetts for many years before returning to her native Vermont in 1911where, with a relative, Jennie Burnett, she operated Cherry Hill Farm in Williston.  During the Great Depression, Ms. Learned took notice of Burnett Rawson, a distant relative, and asked his mother's permission to take him from the family farm in Underhill so that he could study.  Her generosity and vision allowed him to attend the University of Vermont and its medical school. After military service and further medical studies, Dr. Rawson practiced urology in New York for many years before retiring to his native Vermont. Dr. Rawson's goal for the Winnie Belle Learned Fund is to help the small public libraries of Vermont foster literacy, love of learning, critical analysis and intellectual exploration in their communities, particularly among children and their families. His contributions also support the work of the Vermont Early Literacy Initiative, a joint project of the Department of Libraries and the Vermont Center for the Book. To date Dr. Rawson has contributed more than $380,000 to the Winnie Belle Learned Fund.

 

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top3The Top 3 OneClick Digital Books

The first circulation figures from OneClick Digital, the downloadable audio book service brokered by the Department of Libraries and offered through 43 Vermont public libraries, have come in. Here are the books downloaded the most.

 

bookjacketjunkyard Junkyard Dogs: A Walt Longmire Mystery, by Craig Johnson

This is Johnson's sixth mystery featuring laconic Wyoming sheriff Walt Longmire, and it garnered a starred review from Booklist. In this installment, Longmire deals with housing developers and the cantankerous Stewart clan which owns the junkyard next to the development. This title managed to have the most downloads in Vermont's OneClick, even though it has been available only a few weeks, coinciding with the debut of a drama series called Longmire, airing on the A&E TV network. All 6 Longmire books are available on OneClick.

 

 

 

book jacket black alley Black Alley, by Mickey Spillane

An older mystery series, but apparently still very popular, features Spillane's private-eye Mike Hammer. In this title, after being left for dead, Hammer is slowly recovering from a couple of gunshot wounds. That doesn't keep him from being sucked into a case involving mobsters and $89 billion in cash. The action travels from New York City to Florida to Upstate New York. This is the last Hammer mystery written entirely by Spillane before his death in 2006, and the only Spillane title currently on OneClick.

 

 

 

 

book jacket bones Bones, by Jan Burke

Day of Reckoning, by Jack Higgins

Dead Silence, by Randy Wayne White

A three-way tie for third place, and, like the others, all mysteries, all with characters in recurring series. Bones is the only one in this list featuring a female protagonist, crime reporter Irene Kelly, who happens to be married to a cop. Here she deals with a serial killer. Kelly operates in Southern California. Ten books in this series are available on OneClick. In Day of Reckoning, Sean Dillon of the British secret police teams up with a White House security advisor against the Mafia. OneClick has three other titles in the Sean Dillon series. Dead Silence goes a little beyond the usual suspects, with Doc Ford as a marine biologist and black-ops agent based in Florida. This is White's 16th book featuring Ford, here dealing with a botched kidnapping. Six other Doc Ford books are in OneClick.

 

Do you have a recommended list of books you want to share? Let us know.

 

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newNew in The Library Science Collection @The State Library

Librarians and library staff can borrow these from the State Library.

 

Bishop, Sally, and Matthew Bowerman. Rethinking the Call Number [videorecording]. Towson, Md: ALA Video/Library Video Network [distributors], 2010.

 

Chowdhury, Gobinda G. Information Users And Usability In the Digital Age. New York : Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., c2011.

 

Dewey, Melvil, 1851-1931. Abridged Dewey Decimal Classification and Relative Index. Dublin, Ohio : OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., 2012.

 

Godwin, Peter, and Jo Parker. Information Literacy Beyond Library 2.0. London: Facet, 2012.

 

How To Thrive As a Solo Librarian. Edited by Carol Smallwood, Melissa J. Clapp. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2012.

 

Lankes, R. David. Expect More Demanding Better Libraries For Today's Complex World. [S.l.] : R. David Lankes, c2012.

 

McAdoo, Monty L. Fundamentals Of Library Instruction. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Pinnell-Stephens, June. Protecting Intellectual Freedom in Your Public Library: Scenarios From The Front Lines. Chicago : American Library Association, Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2012.

 

Spratford, Becky Siegel. The Readers' Advisory Guide to Horror. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Thomas, Douglas. A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating The Imagination For a World Of Constant Change. Lexington, Ky.: CreateSpace, c2011.


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imls