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In This Issue
Vermont's Postal Carrier of the Year
23 Winnie Belle Learned Grants
85 Libraries Receive Summer Performer Grants
Dream Big @ Your Library
How to Pick Out Books for Teens
Green Mountain Book Award for High Schoolers
Take 25 and Help Keep Children Safe
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TOPVermont's Postal Carrier of the Year

Elizabeth St. Louis, a mail carrier working from the Craftsbury Post Office, has been selected Vermont's Postal Carrier of the Year by the Vermont Department of Libraries, Special Services Unit, and the Vermont Council of the Blind. This is the second year for the award, which was designed to highlight the important partnership between the U.S. Postal Service and the National Library Service for the Blind & Physically Handicapped in the delivery of free audio and Braille books to eligible individuals, and to honor those postal carriers who go out of their way to assist postal patrons with special needs. Elizabeth was nominated by Rev. Arnold Brown of Craftsbury for taking special care with deliveries of medications, and for her ever-friendly and caring demeanor. The award was presented by Teresa Faust, Special Services Librarian, at the annual meeting of the Vermont Council of the Blind in Newport.

23 Winnie Belle Learned Grants 

Thanks to the generosity of Vermont's public libraries' wonderful benefactor, Dr. Burnett Rawson, we were able to fund twenty-three grant proposals out of the thirty-seven submitted to the Winnie Belle Learned fund, a program of the Vermont Public Library Foundation, for a total of $29,597. This fund was created in 2007 by Dr. Rawson in honor of Winnie Belle Learned, a Vermonter, educator, and his benefactress. Dr. Rawson's goal for the Winnie Belle Learned Fund is to help the small public libraries of Vermont foster literacy, love of learning, critical analysis and intellectual exploration in their communities, particularly among children and their families. Read more.

85 Libraries Receive Summer Performer Grants

Eighty-five communities throughout Vermont will be bringing a performer DreamBigReadLogofor children to their libraries this summer, thanks to the Department of Libraries' private endowment, the Elva Sophronia Smith fund. All public libraries that meet standards were invited to apply for a $100 grant to defray the cost of a great Vermont performer. This year's list of approved performers includes storytellers, musicians, naturalists and magicians, among others, all of whom have created programs to go along with this summer's theme, the night.

 Dream Big @ Your Library

To prepare for this summer's program celebrating the night, about 70 librarians attended our summer reading program workshops held in

librariansummerreading

Northfield and Ludlow in March.   

 

Fabulous presenters at both gave ideas for storytimes about the night, complete with early literacy tips, programs for school aged children, and ideas on how to get teens to participate. The handouts from both workshops are on our website: libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/srp/childrenteen.

 

Thanks go to librarians Lindsey Bellville, Brattleboro; Erna Deutsch, Essex Junction; Cheryl Cox, Springfield; Tracey Dugdale, Woodstock; Rachel Funk, Morrisville; Lindsay Grattan, Ludlow; Sarah Lawton, Middlebury; Jane Napier, Montpelier; Sam Maskell, Bellows Falls; Hannah Peacock, Colchester, and Judy Russell, Fairlee, for their presentations. Also presenting were Sandal Cate, North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier; representatives from the Southern Vermont Astronomy Group; and drummer Otha Day.

YALSA Academy: How to Pick Out Books for Teens
YALSA Academy: How to Pick Out Books for Teens

Useful Videos on Working with Teens

YALSA, The Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association, has created some very short, very practical videos focusing on teen services issues. The videos cover a wide variety of topics including social media, technology tools, programming, advocacy, collection development, teen library space, customer service and others. Check them out on YouTube.  

Green Mountain Book Award for High Schoolers  

The Green Mountain Book Award committee selected their new master list, 15 great books for teens, for 2012-2013, posted at libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/gmba

 

Voting for this year is due on Friday, May 11. Voting is open to any Vermont student in grades 9-12 who has read three or more of the books on the list. Librarians are asked to tally their students' votes and submit them online at libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/gmba/voting

Take 25 and Help Keep Children Safe

Take 25 is a child safety campaign created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children centered around National Missing Children's Day, to take place on May 25th. Adults in any position of authority are urged to take 25 minutes to talk to children about safety. Librarians are also encourage to host presentations on Internet Safety, partner to organize a community safety fair or hold workshops for parents. For other ideas and free materials, visit www.take25.org.

        checkitout

Our mild winter and spring have made us forget how long the winters can be. How do Vermonters get through the typical winter? They play outside and manage to read when the mud season gets too deep! Here's a selection from some outdoorsy folks.

 

Hungergames book jacket Mike Smith, ski patrol at Okemo, just finished The Hunger Games; he's waiting for the 5th book in the Game of Thrones. He says, "I really enjoyed The Hunger Games. It's an interesting adventure novel, with the political intrigue that really fits today's climate. In the Air Force we did Survival Escape Resistance and Evasion Training. It was a lot like The Hunger Games--moving through the woods, danger all around. My daughter in law, a philosophy major, recommended the trilogy to me. Where our government is, how much it shapes our lives, how much it controls our lives--I'm reminded of Rome with its bread and circuses."  

Read more 


WB23 Winnie Belle Learned Grants  

Thanks to the generosity of Vermont's public libraries' wonderful benefactor, Dr. Burnett Rawson, we were able to fund twenty-three grant proposals out of the thirty-seven submitted to the Winnie Belle Learned fund, a program of the Vermont Public Library Foundation, for a total of $29,597. This fund was created in 2007 by Dr. Rawson in honor of Winnie Belle Learned, a Vermonter, educator, and his benefactress. Dr. Rawson's goal for the Winnie Belle Learned Fund is to help the small public libraries of Vermont foster literacy, love of learning, critical analysis and intellectual exploration in their communities, particularly among children and their families. The Winnie Belle Learned Fund is the primary funding source for the Vermont Early Literacy Initiative, a program of the Department of Libraries and the Vermont Center for the Book, as well as the funder for this annual grant round for services and programs for children and teens.

 

Interestingly, most of the applications were for collection development, an indication that libraries are still struggling with budget basics. In addition to the collection development grants, there was one to create a young adult space, one to start a Lego club and one to create Community Discovery Backpacks in conjunction with other community organizations and agencies. For a full list with funding amounts and a brief explanation, please see libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/vplf 

 

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo

Our mild winter and spring have made us forget how long the winters can be. How do Vermonters get through the typical winter? They play outside and manage to read when the mud season gets too deep! Here's a selection from some outdoorsy folks.

 

Hungergames book jacket Mike Smith, ski patrol at Okemo, just finished The Hunger Games; he's waiting for the 5th book in the Game of Thrones. He says, "I really enjoyed The Hunger Games. It's an interesting adventure novel, with the political intrigue that really fits today's climate. In the Air Force we did Survival Escape Resistance and Evasion Training. It was a lot like The Hunger Games--moving through the woods, danger all around. My daughter in law, a philosophy major, recommended the trilogy to me. Where our government is, how much it shapes our lives, how much it controls our lives--I'm reminded of Rome with its bread and circuses."

 

 

bossypantsbookjacket Meredith Haff, 33, from Stowe, kept busy this winter learning to skijor with her golden retriever Baxter.  When they come back in to warm up, Meredith has been cracking up by the fire reading Tina Fey's Bossypants. "Fey's humor is witty and relatable, but she slips in some serious commentary on the difficulty female humorists have had to be taken seriously -- as backwards as that sounds!" explains Haff.  She thinks Bossypants is a great slopeside read to get through winter because it keeps the mood light. "Fans of Fey's characters on "Saturday Night Live" or as Liz Lemon on "30 Rock" won't be disappointed, Tina Fey's honest and clever writing will find you laughing out loud."

 

 

Miss Tizzy book jacket Maureen Sands, Grafton, loves walking in the woods-and sometimes brings her granddaughter. She says, "I pick up bits and pieces, and I'm reading things with my grandchildren. My first grandchild likes I'm a Big Sister (Joanna Cole) which is geared for a 2-4 year old. It's about the experience of having a new baby coming home. It's a way to look at the expectations around being a sibling-what you can and can't do. Miss Tizzy (Libba Moore Gray) is another favorite, about an older woman. Her house is the only one of the street that is pink with an overflowing flower garden. The children in the neighborhood flock to her-even though the adults think she's peculiar. The pictures are wonderful."  
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