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In This Issue
The State Librarian Tour
Library Advocay
Red Clover Picture Books
Bring Walter Dean Myers to Vermont
Writing Contest for Young Authors
Vermont Early Literacy Initiative
Teen Cartoonists apply for a Summer Scholarship
Check it out!
New in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library
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Tips & Ideaswheels turning
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TOPThe State Librarian Tour

Area librarians and trustees met with State Librarian Marty Reid at the Rockingham Free Library on January 23. In spite of gray skies and freezing rain, the group had many hot issues to discuss and grapple with. The State Librarian began with the Governor's priorities and the parallel concerns of the Vermont Department of Libraries. She listened as much as she spoke, as the group discussed small library automation, the implications of a statewide catalog and library card, and finding expertise to raise money for local building projects. Many libraries are grappling with issues about ...read more.
New Microfilm Scanners @ State Library
womanlookingatmicrofilmscannerResearchers, genealogists, and Vermont State Library staff are thrilled about the arrival of two new ScanPro2000 microform scanners at the State Library's Newspaper and Documents Room. The new machines use the latest digital technologies to provide high quality resolution viewing and scans of microfilmed images, especially old newspapers. The two machines are accompanied by 24" monitors and offer patrons the opportunity to print or save their documents in a variety of formats. Patrons can now email their scans, removing the need for paper. One of the State Library patrons said that the new microform scanners are "Marvelous! Easy to read and use, and I can email the newspaper articles."  

Library Advocacy

Advocacy is a big topic in Vermont public libraries. Searching for words and concepts to put in library advocates' mouths? Try the new DOL Advocacy site. Michael Roche has pulled information from Geek the Library, OCLC, WebJunction and the American Library Association. Here are directions for getting started, as well as useful resources for statistics and economic facts that will buttress arguments. No one wants to hear a librarian talking about how important libraries are. Advocacy's goal is to help other people learn how to tell the library story.  

 

For a basic introduction to the area, try Library Advocacy Is... or the PowerPoint Advocacy and the Public Library. For groups ready to build a campaign or plan, the  Advocacy Planning Tool offers a step by step process outlining audience, points, the goal and the steps to create an action plan.

Red Clover Picture Books for 2012-2013

Pigs, cars, water and spirals in nature are just a few of the subjects of the Red Clover logopicture books on the new list selected by the Red Clover committee. The Red Clover Award is Vermont's child-selected picture book award for children in grades K-4, and annually has approximately 25,000 participants. The committee, consisting of 10 picture-book-crazy teachers, parents and librarians, chose a wide range of books for the new list, some fiction, and some nonfiction, to be read and discussed in the 2012-2013 school year. The books are: read more.  

Bring Walter Dean Myers to Vermont!

In January, Walter Dean Myers, the award winning author of many fine children's and young adult books, was made the third National Ambassador of Children's Literature, following Vermont's own Katherine Paterson who was the second ambassador. The post was created by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, and the Children's Book Council (CBC) to raise national awareness of the importance of children's literature as it relates to literacy, education, and the development and betterment of children's lives. For the two year appointment, each ambassador selects his or her own slogan, and Myers has selected, "Reading is Not Optional." Read more.

Writing Contest for Young Authors

Young budding authors and illustrators have an opportunity to show off theirpbsgowriterscontestlogo talent by writing and illustrating a story and submitting it for the PBS Kids Go! Writers Contest administered by Vermont Public Television (VPT) and co-sponsored by the Vermont Department of Libraries.

 

VPT invites children in kindergarten, first, second and third grades to enter the contest. The deadline is March 16, 2012. The local contest is designed to promote children's reading skills through hands-on, active learning, as the children write and illustrate original stories.

 

Entry forms and rules can be found online at: read more.

Vermont Early Literacy Initiative 

New Logo and Quarterly Newsletter

The Vermont Early Literacy Initiative, (VELI) co-sponsored by the Department of Libraries and the Vermont Center for the Book, has a new logo. Using this logo, earlyliteracy logoparticipating libraries will be able to coordinate and identify their materials, and the program will have a clearer identity statewide. There are currently 53 public libraries in Vermont that are members of VELI, and who do early literacy programs for children, their parents and childcare providers. This three-pronged approach reaches children through their primary caregivers and helps prepare them to learn to read and succeed in school.

 

Deborah Gadwah-Lambert, the library director at the Alice Ward Library in Canaan, and one of the original VELI members, edits a quarterly newsletter for VELI librarians. There are story time suggestions, books to buy, new information on early literacy and lists of resource materials. Even librarians who are not part of the VELI project will find much that will help them with their story time and early literacy messages in these newsletters. Please see the recently updated VELI webpage for the newsletter and further information:  http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/eli
 Teen Cartoonists apply for a Summer Scholarship!

 For the fourth year in a row, the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction has donated a full scholarship to thecartoonsayssummerandsun Department of Libraries so a Vermont teen can attend their one week workshop, "Create Comics," this summer. This full scholarship, worth $900, includes the workshop, supplies, morning and afternoon snacks, lunch and evening student activities. Lodging is not included, but there is a very inexpensive option at nearby Hotel Coolidge. Any Vermont student age 16 or older (must be 16 years old by June 1, 2012) is eligible. The workshop will take place in White River Junction, VT July 16-20, 2012.  

 

Vermont teens interested in the scholarship should apply through their local school or public library. The only entry requirements are: read more.
        checkitout

What are independent booksellers reading? Which books meant the most? Three Vermont dealers-in Rutland, Montpelier, and Chester-weigh in.

 

bookjacketAGateattheStairs Lynne Herbst of Annie's Book Stop in Rutland plugs A Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore, her favorite read of 2011. Lynne tells us: Tess, the narrator, is a Midwestern girl raised on a farm. She comes of age at the big state university. The biting humor made me laugh out loud. But don't get me wrong, this is a serious story that reminds us of the stark unflattering parts of our culture. The story unfolds as Tess navigates her freshman year and gains an education not found in the classroom. Her part time baby-sitting job for a brittle upscale couple adopting a child is a stark contrast to life on the farm. Her first time back home for the Christmas holiday and her first boyfriend/lover will resonate and remind us of our past. This novel set in post 9/11 speaks to a new consciousness in our daily lives and teaches Tess about racial prejudice, class discrimination and relationships. The author really knows how to turn a phrase and her descriptions are lyrical and almost poetic at times. Laugh at the funny parts, but don't be fooled, this is a poignant book. This was my first Lorrie Moore book but it won't be my last!

Read more 


 tourThe State Librarian Tour

Area librarians and trustees met with State Librarian Marty Reid at the Rockingham Free Library on January 23. In spite of gray skies and freezing rain, the group had many hot issues to discuss and grapple with. The State Librarian began with the Governor's priorities and the parallel concerns of the Vermont Department of Libraries. She listened as much as she spoke, as the group discussed small library automation, the implications of a statewide catalog and library card, and finding expertise to raise money for local building projects. Many libraries are grappling with issues about ebooks and downloadable audio devices, the content providers, expenses, and the need to straddle both the book and ebook world as technology changes rapidly. Librarians discussed the cost and difficulty of using ListenUp! Vermont, Recorded Books, and national initiatives like Roger Miller's Internet Archive (http://www.archive.org ). Broadband access for communities, with questions about VTEL, Sovernet and Fairpoint, is another thorny Vermont issue.

 

Those present at the Rockingham Free Library: Director Celina Houlne,; trustees Duane Whitehead, Debbie Wetzel; staff Samantha Maskell, Wendy O'Connell, Emily Zervas; volunteer Allegra Maskell.

Westminster West: Director Bev Major and trustee Carlene Raper; Wardsboro trustee Jeremy Schrauf; Newfane Director Meris Morrison; Guilford Director Cathi Wilken; Brattleboro Director Jerry Carbone; Grafton Director Michelle Dufort; The Grammar School librarian Ponnie Derby; Windsor High School librarian Mary Alice Powers; Sharon Library Director Rachel Clark; Hartford/Quechee Director Kate Schaal; and Chester Director Sharon Tanzer.
 

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redRed Clover Picture Books for 2012-2013

Pigs, cars, water and spirals in nature are just a few of the subjects of the picture books on the new list selected by the Red Clover committee. The Red Clover Award is Vermont's child-selected picture book award for children in grades K-4, and annually has approximately 25,000 participants. The committee, consisting of 10 picture-book-crazy teachers, parents and librarians, chose a wide range of books for the new list, some fiction, and some nonfiction, to be read and discussed in the 2012-2013 school year. The books are:

Emmett, Jonathan. The Princess and the Pig. Illustrated by Polly Bernatene. Walker, 2011. ISBN 978-0-8027-2334-5.

 

Grey, Mini. Three by the Sea. Knopf, 2011. ISBN 978-0-3758-6784-2.

 

Juster, Norton. Neville. Illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Schwartz & Wade, 2011. ISBN 978-0-3758-6765-1.

 

Lyon, George Ella. All the Water in the World. Illustrated by Katherine Tillotson. Atheneum, 2011. ISBN 978-1-4169-7130-6.

 

McDonnell, Patrick. Me...Jane. Little, Brown, 2011. ISBN 978-0-316-04546-9.

 

Medina, Meg. Tia Isa Wants a Car. Illustrated by Claudio Muñoz. Candlewick, 2011. ISBN 978-0-7636-4156-6.

 

Rocco, John. Blackout. Hyperion, 2011. ISBN 978-1-4231-2190-9.

 

Sidman, Joyce. Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature. Illustrated by Beth Krommes. Houghton, 2011. ISBN 978-0-547-31583-6.

 

Smith, Lane. Grandpa Green. Roaring Brook, 2011. ISBN 978-1-59643-607-7.

 

Sweet, Melissa. Balloons Over Broadway: The True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy's Parade. Houghton, 2011. ISBN 978-0-547-19945-0.

 

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BringBring Walter Dean Myers to Vermont!

In January, Walter Dean Myers, the award winning author of many fine children's and young adult books, was made the third National Ambassador of Children's Literature, following Vermont's own Katherine Paterson who was the second ambassador. The post was created by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, and the Children's Book Council (CBC) to raise national awareness of the importance of children's literature as it relates to literacy, education, and the development and betterment of children's lives. For the two year appointment, each ambassador selects his or her own slogan, and Myers has selected, "Reading is Not Optional." Myers grew up in a household where reading was not valued, but he was hooked early on. Even though he dropped out of high school, he never stopped reading, and credits his reading with making him the writer he is today. He is hoping to take his message across America, but particularly to low income people who may not see reading as a way to succeed.

 

Now the Children's Book Council and the Center for the Book of the Library of Congress are holding a contest for schools and libraries to apply to have Myers visit their institution. To enter, you must describe, in 500 words or less, the event you would develop if he were to visit, how you would spread the word about it, and to whom. Entries must be emailed no later than midnight on March 12 to cbc.info@cbcbooks.org. For more information visit: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Win-a-Visit-with-Walter-Dean-Myers-.html?soid=1101746110611&aid=jBOJoGAtql0.

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PBSWriting Contest for Kids

Young budding authors and illustrators have an opportunity to show off their talent by writing and illustrating a story and submitting it for the PBS Kids Go! Writers Contest administered by Vermont Public Television (VPT) and co-sponsored by the Vermont Department of Libraries.

 

VPT invites children in kindergarten, first, second and third grades to enter the contest. The deadline is March 16, 2012. The local contest is designed to promote children's reading skills through hands-on, active learning, as the children write and illustrate original stories.

 

Entry forms and rules can be found online at http://www.vpt.org/writers .

 

Twelve winners will be chosen, three from each grade, and announced in April. The winners will have their stories read on VPT and posted on VPT's website.  They will be honored at an awards ceremony in May. Each child who enters will receive a certificate of achievement and be invited to read his or her entry at a local story time celebration.

 

The winning story in each grade will be sent on to the PBS Kids Go! national contest.

 

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toonTeen Cartoonists apply for a Summer Scholarship!

For the fourth year in a row, the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction has donated a full scholarship to the Department of Libraries so a Vermont teen can attend their one week workshop, "Create Comics," this summer. This full scholarship, worth $900, includes the workshop, supplies, morning and afternoon snacks, lunch and evening student activities. Lodging is not included, but there is a very inexpensive option at nearby Hotel Coolidge. Any Vermont student age 16 or older (must be 16 years old by June 1, 2012) is eligible. The workshop will take place in White River Junction, VT July 16-20, 2012.  

 

Vermont teens interested in the scholarship should apply through their local school or public library. The only entry requirements are: (1) that the student is at least 16 years old, and (2) the applicant has the ability to attend the entire workshop in July. The contest will be conducted through the library (school or public) and librarians will be responsible for sending in the entry forms to the Department of Libraries by May 18, 2012. DOL will hold a drawing and will let the winning student's librarian know the results.

 

Last year Tyler Murphy from North Country High School in Newport won the scholarship and attended the workshop. About the experience he said, "This workshop was amazing. I had a great time and learned many things that have made me want to advance my future in comics. I have also met many people that have become friends that I hope to keep in contact with. Thank you so much CCS for the chance to broaden my horizon."

 

Entry forms are available for download at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/ccs  

For more information about the workshop and the Center for Cartoon Studies, please visit: www.cartoonstudies.org 

 

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ideasTips and Ideas

Collect Information, Design a Survey

Librarians are looking for ways to combine a good story with the data that illustrates the point behind the story. A brief survey, using SurveyMonkey or  Google Docs, offers library users a chance to comment in their own words. Create a brief template and post the link to the library website. Embed a link on the screen for users to see once they have completed their session. Some users may prefer a printed form that asks the same questions.

 

To explore Google Docs to create a survey form, visit: https://support.google.com/docs/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=87809

 

For background on Google online tools, check out: http://vermontlibrarieslearn.wordpress.com/online-productivity/, "Vermont's 23 Things."   

 

There are other free survey sites on the web, like Survey Monkey (www.surveymonkey.com) or Survey Gizmo (www.surveygizmo.com), which may also be helpful tools.

   

The secret to an effective survey is to keep it as brief as possible. Asking for personal information about the respondent will help the library present statistics effectively. Here are a couple of questions asked in surveys in other states:

  • Do you have regular access to a computer other than the one at the library?
  • During my recent visit to the computer center, I: [Check all that apply]

                       Communicated with someone via email Facebook, online chat, etc.

                       Looked for employment

                       Used the computer for entertainment (video, music, etc.)

                       Found information about government benefits

                       Researched family or local history

                      Obtained/filed an official form (taxes, licenses, Motor Vehicles, e.g.)

                      Used software such as Word, Excel, or Photoshop

                      Other (list)___
   

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scienceNew in the Library Science Collection at the State Library

 

ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference. American Library Association, 2011.     

College libraries and student culture: what we now know. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Broughton, Vanda. Essential Library of Congress Subject Headings. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2012.  

 

Crews, Kenneth D. Copyright law for librarians and educators: creative strategies and practical solutions. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Donaldson, Michael C. Clearance and copyright: everything you need to know for film and television. Los Angeles: Silman-James Press, c2008.

 

Dowell, David R. Crash course in genealogy. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Libraries Unlimited, 2011.

 

Fishman, Stephen. The public domain: how to find & use copyright-free writings, music, art & more. Berkeley, Calif.: Nolo, 2010.

 

Geek the Library: a Community Awareness Campaign: a Report to the OCLC Membership. OCLC, 2011.

Graham, Warren Davis. The black belt librarian: real world safety & security. Chicago: American Library Association, c2012.

 

Holt, Leslie Edmonds. Public Library Services for the Poor: Doing All We Can. American Library Association, 2010.   

 

La Counte, Scott. Going Mobile: Developing Apps for your Library Using Basic HTML Programming.  American Library Association, 2012.   

 

Lavender, Kenneth. Book Repair: a How-to-do-it Manual.  Neal-Schuman Publishers Inc., 2011.   

Levien, Roger Eli. Confronting the future: strategic visions for the 21st century public library. Washington, D.C.: ALA Office for Information Technology Policy, 2011.  

 

Library Management Tips That Work. Carol Smallwood, editor. American Library Association, 2011.   

 

Materials review, Fall 2011 [videorecording] / prepared and presented by the Vermont Department of Libraries. South Burlington, VT : RETN Media Center, 2011.

 

Morris, Vanessa Irvin. The readers' advisory guide to street literature. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Nelson, Jennifer. Technology and literacy: 21st century library programming for children and teens. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want: an OCLC Report.  OCLC, 2009.     

 

Pearlmutter, Jane. Small public library management. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012. 

 

Perceptions of Libraries, 2010: Context and Community: a Report to the OCLC Membership. OCLC, 2011.

 

Polanka, Sue. No Shelf Required 2: Use and Management of Electronic Books. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Pre- and post-retirement tips for librarians. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012.

 

Smith, G. Stevenson. Cost Control for Nonprofits in Crisis. American Library Association, 2011.

Vincent, Jane. Implementing cost-effective assistive computer technology: a how-to-do-it manual for librarians. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers Inc., c2012.

 

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo

What are independent booksellers reading? Which books meant the most? Three Vermont dealers-in Rutland, Montpelier, and Chester-weigh in.

 

bookjacketAGateattheStairs Lynne Herbst of Annie's Book Stop in Rutland plugs A Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore, her favorite read of 2011. Lynne tells us: Tess, the narrator, is a Midwestern girl raised on a farm. She comes of age at the big state university. The biting humor made me laugh out loud. But don't get me wrong, this is a serious story that reminds us of the stark unflattering parts of our culture. The story unfolds as Tess navigates her freshman year and gains an education not found in the classroom. Her part time baby-sitting job for a brittle upscale couple adopting a child is a stark contrast to life on the farm. Her first time back home for the Christmas holiday and her first boyfriend/lover will resonate and remind us of our past. This novel set in post 9/11 speaks to a new consciousness in our daily lives and teaches Tess about racial prejudice, class discrimination and relationships. The author really knows how to turn a phrase and her descriptions are lyrical and almost poetic at times. Laugh at the funny parts, but don't be fooled, this is a poignant book. This was my first Lorrie Moore book but it won't be my last!

 

bookjacket House of Silk George Spaulding of Bear Pond Books feels there's no place like Holmes, and recommends two new Sherlock Holmes books. He just finished The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz and loved it. George: Silk is the first Holmes novel ever authorized by the Conan Doyle estate. It's both nostalgic-it's narrated by Watson from a nursing home where he's gone to end his days-and a cracking good mystery. There's a mysterious foreigner [well, New York]; there are brilliant Holmesian deductions; there's murder; there's even a carriage chase. Horowitz's Watsonian voice is perfect-spot on without being slavishly imitative. House of Silk is the best Holmes book I've read in the past 20 years.A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon, is co-edited by Laurie R. King of Mary Russell fame and includes Holmesian stories by Neil Gaiman, Lee Child, Margaret Maron, and a batch of other wonderful writers. There's even one written [& illustrated!] by Colin Cotterill called The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story. Really, the book had me at 'Canon', but so far it's enjoyable all the way through.

 

bookjacketthetimeinbetween From Misty Valley Books in Chester, Lynne Reed likes The Time in Between by María Dueñas. "Great European novels are slowly making their way across the Atlantic, being translated into English. María Dueñas, a professor at the University of Murcia in Spain, has written an un-putdownable novel, The Time in Between, now available to the English-speaking world. This sweeping historical novel is set in Madrid and North Africa during the Spanish Civil War and the rise of Franco. Dueñas' mother, born in the Spanish protectorate of Morocco (which existed from 1912-1956), was the inspiration for the setting. Juan Beigbeder, an intriguing high commissioner of the protectorate, was the inspiration for the espionage story thread. Her main character, Sira Quiroga, the daughter of a seamstress, flees Madrid for Morocco , and, abandoned by her lover, does the only thing she knows how to do to survive-sew, and builds a prestigious business in haute couture for high-level Nazi wives. She is well placed to pass classified information with stitches in Morse code in the hems of dresses. This is a thrilling story of espionage, love, and great history. "

 

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