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In This Issue
Interlibrary Task Force Issues
Digitizing American Newspapers
The Big Read Grant
Collect Stories of Library Use with this Widget
Advocates to Tell the Library Story
Public Librarians to Meet In Philadelphia
Computer Training Help is a Click Away
Annual Non-Profit Centennial Awards
Front Porch Forum Offers Opportunity for Libraries
Dolly Parton's Imagination Library
Advocacy for Youth Services
Spring Materials Review Sessions
Celebrate El Día de los Niños
Summer Reading Program
SAVE THE DATE
DCF CONFERENCE MAY 4, 2012
Helpful Links
Department of Libraries

VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
 
VCAL GMLC

VT Folklife Center 
Join Our Mailing List

topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

Janus, the two-faced Roman god, has once again raised his head. Or should I say "heads"? According to mythology he is the one who looks both backward and forward, the god of transition. As I understand it, January has its root in the name Janus and, like many of you, I use this first month of the year as a time for both reflection and planning. For many of us this marks the middle of the fiscal year and we measure our expenditures to date against remaining budgeted funds. Are we on track? Do our expenditures match what we have in our planning documents? Have our priorities changed? Are there new opportunities that did not exist when the budget was prepared? Is there wiggle room to make changes in spending during the next six months?  

 

At the Department of Libraries, "Janus-thinking" is alive and well. At the end of 2011 I submitted our annual federal LSTA (Library Services & Technology Act) report to the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) -- loaded with facts and figures about the use of our federal FY10 funds and federally-supported programs and services. DOL is currently working...read more

Interlibrary Task Force Issues

Report 

Back in April, we reported that the State Librarian appointed a group of public and academic librarians to a new Interlibrary Loan Task Force. The Task Force was charged with: (1) examining the current state of interlibrary loan (ILL) costs and delivery service in Vermont, (2) researching models used in other states, and (3) issuing a report and recommendations by the end of 2011. Read more.

newspaper,digitalcopies,computer

Digitizing American Newspapers

Imagine a world in which one of the pressing problems facing the U.S. government would be how to dispose of Federal surplus, or one in which Texas secedes from Mexico, declares itself an independent republic, and pledges its allegiance to the recently overthrown government of Mexico. If you think this things could never happen, you may be surprised to learn they already have.

 

These matters were under discussion in the January 5, 1836, edition of the Rutland Herald, along with the latest Vermont legislative news: acts were passed appropriating funds to grade and fence the grounds surrounding the State House (then under construction), requiring that boats on Lake Champlain carry lights in the night time, providing for the destruction of crows, and encouraging the production of silk by offering ten cents per pound of silkworm cocoons. Read more

The Big Read Grant: Application Deadline Feb. 1

Want to encourage reading in your community? Receive free books? Sponsor an author visit? Have access to extensive literature resources and training? Libraries, non-profits and government entities are all eligible to apply for a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to develop a community-wide reading program to take place between September 2012 and June 2013.

 

Seventy-five organizations from across the country will be selected to participate in this year's Big Read. Application deadline is February 1, 2012. The Big Read is "designed to revitalize the role of literature in American culture and to encourage reading for pleasure and enlightenment." To learn more about this great program visit: http://www.neabigread.org/ .

Collect Stories of Library Use with this Widget 

lib us widgetLibraries looking to harvest stories from their users should consider use of web technology. One easy installation: the LibrariUS widget from the American Library Association (ALA). ALA's Office for Library Advocacy and the Public Library Association (PLA) created an interactive website to inspire users. Patrons are linked to the LibrariUS website when they log in to the library widget with first name and last initial. The widget also shows entries from other library patrons around the country and maps resultsThis could be a great tool for local library advocacy. Directions for embedding the LibrariUS widget are at http://www.ala.org/pla/librarius.  Results from the widget are shared with the local library, ALA and PLA, and journalists in the American Public Media's Public Insight Network. The privacy rights of contributors are spelled out at: http://americanpublicmedia.publicradio.org/about/privacy/#pin

 

To see the widget in action, take a look at the Shrewsbury, MA, library site: http://www.shrewsbury-ma.gov/egov/docs/1306267878746.htm.

 

Here's a sample story: Betty in Deerfield Beach, Florida says library services have been her lifeline after losing her job two years ago. "Living alone and without income is not easy. The library has become a very important place for me."  We think that's a great story - just imagine what kind of stories we could collect from library users here in Vermont!

turning the page logo Advocates to Tell the Library Story: Free Training

Sign up now and join your peers! Vermont public librarians and library advocates (library staff, trustees and Friends) are taking part in Turning the Page 2.0, national online training created by the Public Library Association (PLA) with funding from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Turning the Page offers instruction and support as public libraries work on their individual library advocacy plans. In November 2009 a group of Vermont librarians and trustees attended PLA's Turning the Page training in St. Louis, Missouri. Now it is available at no cost online. The online version of Turning the Page does require a bit of effort from participants; the time commitment is about three hours a week, including discussion with the online community and regular homework assignments, for six weeks. But the training has real value for public libraries. Read more.

Public Librarians to Meet In Philadelphia

PLA Logo2012 Feeling tired of the daily stresses of your library? Need an infusion of new ideas and a sense of what lies ahead for public libraries? The Public Library Association, a division of ALA, holds its major conference March 13-17 in Philadelphia. Join national and Vermont colleagues for high level discussion, stimulating presentations and plenty of opportunities for networking with librarians from across the country,bracketed by keynote speakers Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Betty White. If authors are an incentive, the Conference features David Baldacci, Joyce Carol Oates, Jerry Pinkney, and Carl Hiaasen.  Read more. 

Computer Training Help is a Click Away

Social Networks 101
Social Networks 101

We know that libraries are often overwhelmed with the demand for computer training at all levels for the general public - and also for library staff members. Here are some tools that can help. Does your library need some basic tutorials for the public so they can learn how to send email, search the Internet or find reliable health information? Check out the YouTube videos on the e-Vermont page at:  http://e4vt.org/programs/e-vermont/newsevents/webinars 

 

For library staff who need a review or update on using the Vermont Online Library databases try: "Your Library Presents: Information 24/7." 

Library staff and town officials will benefit from this: "Using Facebook to Build Community."

Annual Non-Profit Centennial Awards

Each year the Secretary of State honors non-profit organizations that have reached the 100-year-old milestone.  Non-profits that are (at least) 100 years old will be honored at the annual celebration at the State House on March 14.  For award applications, go to: www.sec.state.vt.us

Application deadline: February 8, 2012.

Front Porch Forum Offers Opportunity for Libraries

Front Porch Forum (FPF), the online community that is spreading to towns across Vermont, offers a great opportunity for libraries. Front Porch Forum's front porch forum logomission is to "help neighbors connect and build community. [They] do that by hosting regional networks of online neighborhood forums." Founded in 2006, FPF is now available in hundreds of Vermont neighborhoods, including many town-wide forums. Most recently, FPF has begun service in the 24 towns that are part of the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project. If FPF is available in your town, consider using it to announce upcoming library programs,  highlight new materials or services, or for other announcements (e.g. an opening for library trustee; book sale help needed, etc.) To find out more about FPF go to their website: http://frontporchforum.com/

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library

By David Clark, Director, Ilsley Library, Middlebury

Reading with young children is essential in children's development of language and literacy skills and should begin in the very first years of life. How can we make sure this happens?   Families in Addison County have a valuable resource called Dolly Parton's Imagination Library (DPIL).  Each month children enrolled in this program are mailed a free age-appropriate book that is theirs to keep.  It is open to any child (birth to 5 years) who lives in Addison County.

 

Ilsley Public Library in Middlebury connected with Imagination Library as a literacy effort coming out of its long range plan in 2007.  Soon thereafter a group of volunteers formed Addison County Readers, Inc. (ACR) to expand the program county-wide. Since then over 35,000 picture books have been mailed to youngsters in all 23 towns in the county. Read more

Advocacy for Youth Services

To help a library that was threatened with losing staffing for its children's room, Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene, with the help of the American Library Association (ALA), gathered documents and talking points about the importance of a children's librarian and library services to youth. With fiscal challenges, a lack of understanding of the importance of libraries in children's lives and misunderstandings about the impact of eBooks, more and more libraries may be confronted with threats of this kind. Two documents that can help are on the ALA website:

Facts from an ALA Advocacy Campaign, http://www.ala.org/alsc/issuesadv/kidscampaign/factstk 

The Core Competencies of an Effective Children's Librarian,  http://www.ala.org/ala//mgrps/divs/alsc/edcareeers/alsccorecomps/ALA_print_layout_1_506107_506107.cfm  

 

In addition, DOL has several other powerful documents that can help libraries make the case. Be sure to contact Grace Greene at 828-6954 (grace.greene@state.vt.us) if you need help advocating for library services to youth.

Materials Review Sessions: Spring Dates

Public and school librarians are invited to attend one of the spring Materials Review Sessions to help them decide what books to order for their children and teens. Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene will orally review about 75 recently published books. Greene will also display hundreds more titles that have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers, or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books will have reviews taped inside so librarians can see what they are getting before they order. Grace will do two "live" sessions of Materials Review this spring, one in Northfield and one at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, and two sessions on DVD. The Regional Educational Television Network (RETN) will record the Northfield presentation, and that recording will be shown in the other two locations. The books, with the reviews inserted in them, will accompany the DVD, so participants at all sites will have access to all the books. The schedule is as follows: read more

logodiadelosninosy libros

Last summer libraries celebrated diversity and cultural differences through the "One World, Many Stories" summer theme. A good way to continue the celebration and exploration of world (and local) cultures is to observe El Día de Los Niños/ El Día de Los Libros. Día is a celebration of children, families, and reading that emphasizes the importance of advocating for literacy for children of all linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Yearly, April 30 culminates the celebration with special activities, events, and programs that celebrate the importance of the well-being of children and diversity.

 

For a booklist, planning guide, and to learn more visit: http://dia.ala.org/. Be sure to register your library with ALA so we can put Vermont on the map as a state that celebrates diversity and literacy.

Summer Reading Program: Dream Big, Read!

This summer Vermont public libraries will be encouraging reading and DreamBigReadLogocelebrating nighttime using materials produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a national collaborative that uses its resources and buying power to create excellent materials at very low prices. As always, the Department of Libraries is purchasing reading records, posters, bookmarks and certificates for all Vermont libraries and bookmobiles that participate. DOL submitted the main order at the end of December, and libraries should receive all their materials by April 1. We will be sending a second order in February, so libraries that didn't make the first deadline will still be able to get free materials if they get their order to DOL by January 27. The form can be found here: read more.

ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

Janus, the two-faced Roman god, has once again raised his head. Or should I say "heads"? According to mythology he is the one who looks both backward and forward, the god of transition. As I understand it, January has its root in the name Janus and, like many of you, I use this first month of the year as a time for both reflection and planning. For many of us this marks the middle of the fiscal year and we measure our expenditures to date against remaining budgeted funds. Are we on track? Do our expenditures match what we have in our planning documents? Have our priorities changed? Are there new opportunities that did not exist when the budget was prepared? Is there wiggle room to make changes in spending during the next six months?

 

At the Department of Libraries, "Janus-thinking" is alive and well. At the end of 2011 I submitted our annual federal LSTA (Library Services & Technology Act) report to the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) -- loaded with facts and figures about the use of our federal FY10 funds and federally-supported programs and services. DOL is currently working with Himmel & Wilson Library Consultants as they evaluate the past five years of our LSTA-funded programs in Vermont. Many of you have participated in that evaluation process via focus groups and phone interviews, and more of you will have an opportunity to provide feedback in an upcoming online survey. (Stay tuned for an announcement in the next couple of weeks.) These two reports will provide important data about our past work and will be valuable tools as we look ahead to the next five years of LSTA funding. In February I will begin the process of creating the new Vermont LSTA 5-Year Plan, 2013-2017 which is due to IMLS in June.

 

Meanwhile, our 2012 calendar is filling up. Here are some items of note for February:

  • Renovations of the Vermont Interlibrary Loan office (in Montpelier) will be complete, and final plans for the redesign of the public space of the Vermont State Library should be ready.
  • On February 1 we will post the 2012 Continuing Education calendar of training opportunities for public library staff.
  • The Vermont State Library staff will put the final touches on a survey that will go out to the three branches of state government to assess their information and research needs.
  • We will complete delivery of new computer equipment to the libraries that serve e-Vermont towns in Year Two of the federally funded e-Vermont Community Broadband Project. http://e4vt.org/ 
  • The "e-Communities in a Digital Age" Conference (February 16 at Vermont Technical College) will feature a panel of librarians from e-Vermont towns. http://e4vt.org/programs/e-vermont/newsevents/conferences 
  • We will announce recipients of the 2012 Winnie Belle Learned Grant awards from the Vermont Public Library Foundation.

Happy New Year!

 

 

Martha Reid

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ILLInterlibrary Loan Task Force Issues  

Report 

Back in April, we reported that the State Librarian appointed a group of public and academic librarians to a new Interlibrary Loan Task Force. The Task Force was charged with: (1) examining the current state of interlibrary loan (ILL) costs and delivery service in Vermont, (2) researching models used in other states, and (3) issuing a report and recommendations by the end of 2011. Committee members are: Emily Alling, Rice-Aron Library, Marlboro College (co-Chair); Mara Siegel, Department of Libraries (co-Chair); Sandy Duling, Calvin Coolidge Library, Castleton State College; Amy Grasmick, Kimball Public Library, Randolph; Kristen Hindes, Durick Library, St. Michael's College; Becky Jensen, Peacham Library, Peacham; Chris Kirby, Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury; Karen Lane, Aldrich Public Library, Barre; Rhonda Murphy, Royalton Memorial Library, Royalton; and Rubi Simon, Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester.

 
The Comittee met several times in 2011 and created an online survey which was sent to academic and public libraries. The survey was designed to assess current ILL resources and methods being used to move material around the state and to determine interest in a statewide courier service. The Task Force also contacted librarians in several other states to gather information about their ILL delivery service methods.

 

Some key findings detailed in the report are:

  • Currently 60,000-100,000 items each year are loaned by Vermont public and academic libraries to other Vermont libraries.
  • The shipping cost per transaction each way is $1.50 - $3.00.
  • In states with courier services, the delivery cost per transaction is dramatically lower.
  • Vermont libraries are cautiously receptive to the idea of a statewide courier service.

Recommendations detailed in the report include:

  • Monitor and support the development of regional and statewide cooperative library arrangements.
  • Measure the impact of changes to the United States Postal Service delivery in Vermont, should they occur, on turnaround times for ILL transactions.

The ILL Task Force will meet again in 2012 and will contact courier companies to investigate the feasibility and costs of a statewide courier service to Vermont libraries.

 

Click here to read the full report. 

 

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digitDigitizing American Newspapers

Imagine a world in which one of the pressing problems facing the U.S. government would be how to dispose of Federal surplus, or one in which Texas secedes from Mexico, declares itself an independent republic, and pledges its allegiance to the recently overthrown government of Mexico. If you think this things could never happen, you may be surprised to learn they already have.

 

These matters were under discussion in the January 5, 1836, edition of the Rutland Herald, along with the latest Vermont legislative news: acts were passed appropriating funds to grade and fence the grounds surrounding the State House (then under construction), requiring that boats on Lake Champlain carry lights in the night time, providing for the destruction of crows, and encouraging the production of silk by offering ten cents per pound of silkworm cocoons.

 

Period newspapers such as the Herald cover a vast array of topics such as social issues, war, crime, technology and progress, education, labor, fashion, material culture, community history, etc. As fascinating as these subjects are - to the historian at least - they are not nearly as interesting to us as our own personal histories. In that regard, newspapers also cover particular people, proper names, family names, and businesses, particular cities, towns, and communities, all somewhere in the millions of pages of newsprint in libraries around the country.

 

Fortunately, the Library of Congress, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities, has made it possible to search those newspaper pages for Great-great Grandfather Percival as easily as searching for Texas' foreign policy.

 

The project is called the National Digital Newspaper Program and the database is Chronicling America. The aim is to digitize American newspapers from 1836 to 1922, making full-text searching of newspapers just a click or two away. Searches can be made of both full-text newspaper pages (currently a mere 4,540,417 pages can be searched in Chronicling America) and bibliographic newspaper records in the U.S. Newspaper Directory. Pages are displayed in JPG format, dynamically created from source files upon user request, and presented through the browser interface using a combination of JavaScript, DHTML and AJAX Web programming. For the non-technical among us, that means that the newspapers can be easily moved all around the webpage display, and magnified, cropped and saved, almost as easily as on your Sunday breakfast table.

 

Selections for inclusion in the database have been made by committees in each state which have evaluated newspapers in terms of their significance, coverage, completeness of runs, and image suitability of the paper (or microfilm) itself. In the first eighteen months of the project, the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project (under the leadership of UVM's Bailey/Howe Library with grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities) digitized 82,000 pages of Vermont newspapers; by the August 31, 2012 deadline, around 130,000 pages from 32 Vermont newspapers will be available.

 

Silk manufacture may never have taken off in Vermont, and the impetus to destroy crows seems to have faded, but the story of Vermont and Vermonters continues, and can now be easily discovered...along with our own personal histories - even G-G-Grandfather Percival. Who can resist?

 

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PAGEAdvocates to Tell the Library Story: Free Training

Sign up now and join your peers! Vermont public librarians and library advocates (library staff, trustees and Friends) are taking part in Turning the Page 2.0, national online training created by the Public Library Association (PLA) with funding from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Turning the Page offers instruction and support as public libraries work on their individual library advocacy plans. In November 2009 a group of Vermont librarians and trustees attended PLA's Turning the Page training in St. Louis, Missouri. Now it is available at no cost online. The online version of Turning the Page does require a bit of effort from participants; the time commitment is about three hours a week, including discussion with the online community and regular homework assignments, for six weeks. But the training has real value for public libraries. Six topics of focus are: (1) National Research on Perceptions of the Library; (2) Telling the Library Story; (3) Leadership; (4) Building Relationships; (5) Asking for Funding; and (6) Laying the Foundation for the Advocacy Work Plan.

 

Does completing the Turning the Page training make a difference? Nancy Tusinski, Librarian Technician, from the Springfield Town Library, saw her focus on creating library programs change after she took the training. She learned to make partnerships a key theme in her planning - for example, involving students from the local tech center for a Button Up Vermont presentation. She realized that the library benefited by strengthening the ties with the high school -- and also by showing Springfield something that residents could be proud of -- its bright young students.

 

A Vermont Young Adult Services Librarian, who took the course online, wrote, "This advocacy program really is making an impression on me.  I found myself thinking about what I was doing in a meeting with other librarians the other day.  They asked me to answer some questions and I could (using my basic advocacy skills that I had learned so far). The next day I got a phone call and two emails from committee members telling me how grateful they were that I was there to answer the questions.  I also got a personal visit from a potential donor who wanted to compliment me on my presentation.  So, once again, I have to say I am very grateful for this class and all the skills taught in it. It works!"

 

The next Turning the Page online series begins on March 19 and we want to get as many librarians, trustees, and library supporters as possible participating. The Department of Libraries will offer credit towards certification for Vermont public library staff members who complete the free course and the work plan. Public librarians, library staff, trustees, and supporters may sign up and we encourage teams from individual libraries.  Registration for the March 19 - April 23 session opens January 30, 2012.  A second series will be offered this summer. For more information, contact Christine Friese at christine.friese@state.vt.us or visit: http://www.ala.org/pla/education/turningthepage/  

 

Don't delay! Sign up today so you can put your new advocacy skills to work to transform library service in your community.

 

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PLA Public Librarians to Meet In Philadelphia

Feeling tired of the daily stresses of your library? Need an infusion of new ideas and a sense of what lies ahead for public libraries? The Public Library Association, a division of ALA, holds its major conference March 13-17 in Philadelphia. Join national and Vermont colleagues for high level discussion, stimulating presentations and plenty of opportunities for networking with librarians from across the country, bracketed by keynote speakers Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and Betty White. If authors are an incentive, the Conference features David Baldacci, Joyce Carol Oates, Jerry Pinkney, and Carl Hiaasen.

 

The PLA Conference is held every two years; 2014 is scheduled for Indianapolis, 2016 for Denver. By comparison, Philadelphia is pretty close by. PLA is small enough to meet people and get to know them. With some 200 programs, librarians have much to choose from: the schedule includes  programs on leadership, using data, special needs, community building, performance evaluations, engaging customers, sexual health resources and much more. Events are held in the Pennsylvania Convention Center, convenient and walkable. The deadline for early-bird discounts is over, but there is still time to register.  More information and registration link is at: http://www.placonference.org   DOL will be well-represented at the conference. Please join State Librarian Marty Reid, Asst. State Librarian Christine Friese, Library consultants Michael Roche and Amy Howlett, and Youth Services Grace Greene in Philadelphia. We'd love to see Vermont librarians and trustees there!

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DOLLYDolly Parton's Imagination Library

By David Clark, Director, Ilsley Library, Middlebury

 

Reading with young children is essential in children's development of language and literacy skills and should begin in the very first years of life. How can we make sure this happens?   Families in Addison County have a valuable resource called Dolly Parton's Imagination Library (DPIL).  Each month children enrolled in this program are mailed a free age-appropriate book that is theirs to keep.  It is open to any child (birth to 5 years) who lives in Addison County.

 

Ilsley Public Library in Middlebury connected with Imagination Library as a literacy effort coming out of its long range plan in 2007.  Soon thereafter a group of volunteers formed Addison County Readers, Inc. (ACR) to expand the program county-wide. Since then over 35,000 picture books have been mailed to youngsters in all 23 towns in the county. Eight hundred preschoolers out of 1,772 children (45%) in the 2010 census below the age of 5 are now enrolled. Based on the 2010 census figures, ACR is reaching a minimum of 20% of the eligible children to a maximum of 65% in the 25 towns.

 

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library is, understandably, immensely popular with both children and parents. Parents report that receiving a book in the mail is the highlight of their children's day and that many DPIL books are among the more cherished in their collections. For families whose resources are limited, the program is an especially important resource.  

 

Addison County is the only place in Vermont to offer this program currently. Addison County Readers is an all-volunteer organization and partners with United Way of Addison County (serving as the fiscal agent), Ilsley Public Library, and Wells Mountain Foundation to provide the match required by DPIL, $30 per child per year. Support for ACR comes from local donors, grantors, Rotary, American Legion, businesses, and the towns of Addison County. Registration brochures are available in public and school libraries, at doctors' offices, childcare centers, playgroups, and other places serving young children, as well as at various community events.

If you are interested in learning more about establishing this program in your community, contact Sarah Lawton, Ilsley Public Library, at sarah.lawton@ilsleypubliclibrary.org or Dinah Bain, president of ACR, at cdbain@gmavt.net. The ACR website (www.addisoncountyreaders.org) has answers to questions, lists of the books provided, as well as registration information and online donation opportunities.

 

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MATERIALSMaterials Review Sessions: Spring Dates

Public and school librarians are invited to attend one of the spring Materials Review Sessions to help them decide what books to order for their children and teens. Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene will orally review about 75 recently published books. Greene will also display hundreds more titles that have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers, or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books will have reviews taped inside so librarians can see what they are getting before they order. Grace will do two "live" sessions of Materials Review this spring, one in Northfield and one at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, and two sessions on DVD. The Regional Educational Television Network (RETN) will record the Northfield presentation, and that recording will be shown in the other two locations. The books, with the reviews inserted in them, will accompany the DVD, so participants at all sites will have access to all the books. The schedule is as follows:

Wednesday, March 28

Brown Public Library, Northfield

LIVE!

Thursday, March 29

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum

LIVE!

Monday, April 9

Milton Public Library

 

Tuesday, April 17

Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow

 

                                                           

All programs begin at 9:00 a.m. Registration is not required. There is a formal part to the program and then plenty of time to examine all the books. For those who cannot attend any of the programs, the presentation will be streamed live on the RETN website  http://www.retn.org/site-search?keys=materials+review
and the accompanying bibliography will be on our website, http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/mrs.

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DCFDCF Conference is May 4, 2012

The tenth annual Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) conference will be held on Friday, May 4, 2012, at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe. The keynote speaker will be Jon Scieszka,the first National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, and creator of the site, "Guys Read," as well as the author of many funny books including the Time Warp series, The Stinky Cheese Man, Math Curse, and his memoir, Knucklehead. The afternoon speaker will be Raina Telgemeier, graphic novelist, who wrote and illustrated the very popular dental memoir graphic novel, Smile, which is on this year's DCF list.

 

In addition, there will be workshops on the new DCF master list: ways to incorporate technology into your program; hands-on workshops with creative things to do with the DCF books; and several others.

The 2012-2013 DCF master list books and the ones by Scieszka and Telgemeier, will be for sale at a 20% discount. The conference is cosponsored by Friends of DCF, the DCF Award Committee, Vermont Department of Libraries, Vermont Department of Education, VT-NEA, Vermont Library Association and Vermont School Library Association. Registration forms were sent out to all libraries and schools in mid-January. Librarians are urged to encourage their 4th-8th grade teachers to attend, too.

 

New this year: The Friends of DCF are giving out six conference scholarships this year to people who would otherwise not be able to attend the conference. The scholarship will cover the total cost of the conference. The form to apply is here:  http://www.dcfaward.org/. Deadline is February 24, 2012. To learn more about the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award program, a child-selected book award for children in grades 4-8, please visit the DCF website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/dcf/dcfconference 

 

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SUMMERSummer Reading Program: Dream Big, Read!

This summer Vermont public libraries will be encouraging reading and DreamBigReadLogocelebrating nighttime using materials produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a national collaborative that uses its resources and buying power to create excellent materials at very low prices. As always, the Department of Libraries is purchasing reading records, posters, bookmarks and certificates for all Vermont libraries and bookmobiles that participate. DOL submitted the main order at the end of December, and libraries should receive all their materials by April 1. We will be sending a second order in February, so libraries that didn't make the first deadline will still be able to get free materials if they get their order to DOL by January 27. The form can be found here: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/srp/childrenteen 

 

The theme this year focuses on night and dreaming. The slogan for kids is Dream Big-Read!, for teens it is Own the Night, and for adults it is Between the Covers. There will be two workshops in March to prepare librarians for the summer reading program: Wednesday, March 21, in Northfield, or Tuesday, March 20, at the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow. Amy Howlett (Ludlow) and Grace Greene (Northfield) are planning fun-filled days of ideas on programs, books, decorations, and performers for your summer program. Registration for these workshops will be available online on February 1 when the DOL Continuing Education calendar for 2012 is posted online.

 

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imls