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In This Issue
VLTA Focuses on Planning for the Future
Computers for Low-Income Families
Sign up for the Trustte Listserv
DCF Committee Seeks New Members
Fall Materials Review
Books for the Holidays
Apply for Ezra Jack Keats Minigrant
Summer Materials to Arrive Soon
"This is Teen"
Check it out!
New in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library
Learn more
Tips & Ideaswheels turning
Helpful Links
Department of Libraries
VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
VT Humanities Council
VCAL
GMLC

VT Folklife Center

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topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

This fall has been especially busy for me, and though much of my work is "behind the scenes" and not always visible to Vermont libraries, it is vitally important to the future of library service in our state.

I thought you'd be interested in reading about some of my activities and about discussions taking place that affect libraries at the state and national levels.

 

State of Vermont Strategic Planning: Since June the State of Vermont has been working on a strategic planning process that began with Governor Shumlin sharing his vision and priorities and which requires all State Agencies and Departments to develop a strategic plan by the end of the year. Over the past few months DOL (Department of Libraries) employees have been meeting to discuss our vision and priorities. Our department's new strategic plan, designed to align with the priorities set by the State leadership, has now been submitted to the Secretary of Administration for review. I expect to have the final plan approved by the end of December and will then make it available to the public.

 

Federal LSTA-5-Year Plan:  DOL is required to have a federally-approved LSTA 5-year Plan that shows how we will use federal LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) funds.  Read more.

VLTA Focuses on Planning for the Future

Public Library Trustees from across the state travelled to the Vermont State House on Saturday, November 5 for the annual Vermont Library Trustee Association (VLTA) Conference. Keynote speaker Karen Marshall, who heads Governor Shumlin's ConnectVT initiative, inspired the group with her vision of Vermont libraries as community "e-spots," and for expanded fiber optic technology across the state. In the next session, Library trustees Elizabeth Tannenbaum (Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro), Shirley Richardson (Pope Memorial Library, Danville), and Susan Schreibman (Rutland Free Library) spoke about strategic planning at their libraries. Each offered a different perspective and approach to strategic planning and their presentation was followed by a spirited Q & A exchange that provided both the "nuts and bolts" and the benefits of implementing a strategic planning process. In the afternoon (following the annual trustee trivia challenge) Christopher Kaufman Ilstrup of the Vermont Community Foundation and DOL's Michael Roche traded advice and comments on planning and implementing a local library Planned Giving program. One important "takeaway" from the discussion: the Vermont Community Foundation will visit individual Vermont libraries to help local boards plan and implement a local Planned Giving program.

 

The Department of Libraries has posted the slides from Karen Marshall's talk, along with strategic planning links, contact information for Kaufman Ilstrup and Roche, the "Bluff the Listener" trivia questions, and other information of interest to library trustees and librarians at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees

Computers for Low-Income Families

In 2012 Microsoft and other technology partners will team up to deliver computers to low-income families. This is part of a program offered by a new non-profit collaborative called "Connect to Compete," created in partnership with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase adoption of high-speed Internet access and digital literacy skills in disadvantaged households across the country. To qualify for the program families must have at least one child enrolled in the free school lunch program. Program leaders estimate that 15 million families will qualify to receive a new computer. For more information: http://connect2compete.org/ Libraries will want to help spread the word about this program to community groups, students, and families. Read more

Sign up for the Public Library Trustee Listserv   

The Department of Libraries maintains a free Public Library Trustee Listserv where trustees can exchange information, participate in electronic discussions, post questions and receive DOL news.  Trustees may sign up for the listserv by sending an email to jeremiah.kellogg@state.vt.us

In the body of the email trustees should include their name and email address, as well as the name of the library where they serve as a trustee.

DCF Committee Seeks New Members

The Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Book Award, Vermont's children's choice award for grades 4-8, is a great way to get children reading and talking about excellent books. Founded in 1957, it is the country's second oldest child-selected book award, and as such has a rich history and outstanding reputation nationally.

 

There will be two openings on the DCF committee for the upcoming year. This is a great opportunity for someone who loves to read children's books to meet with others with the same passion for bringing books and children together. Anyone interested in applying should email a letter of interest, a resume and two original reviews (one positive and one negative), of children's books of their choice, to Grace Greene (grace.greene@state.vt.us) by January 27, 2012. The new members will be selected in February and will begin their duties in the summer.  Terms are for three years, with a chance to renew for a second term.

Fall Materials Review Available in Two Formats

The book review session for school and public librarians that was held in Northfield on October 26 is now available in DVD format and via streaming on the Regional Educational Technology Network (RETN) site at: http://www.retn.org/programs/library-materials-review-session-fall-2011

To borrow a DVD recording of the workshop, please contact Linda Willis-Pendo:linda.willis-pendo@state.vt.us

 To see the accompanying bibliography, go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/mrs

Books for the Holidays

Libraries can help patrons with holiday shopping by offering book suggestions as gifts for family members and friends. When suggesting books as gifts, library staff will want to recommended books that are still in print. Some resources that lead the gift-giver to books beyond the bestseller list include: "Vermont Books 2011" and "Rapid Reviews 2011" at:  http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/misc

Read more.

Apply For Ezra Jack Keats Minigrant

bookjacketundiadenieveThis year marks the 24th annual call for grant proposals by the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation. Schools, public libraries, and Head Start programs are eligible to apply for a $500 minigrant to support creative programming with kids. The new deadline for grant submission is March 15 of each year. All minigrant applications must be submitted electronically. To help applicants, there is now a video tutorial explaining the process on the Foundation's website.

 

The next deadline for submission of proposals for the $500 grant is March 15, 2012.  Winners will be announced starting on May 15. For more information, and to access the online application, go to the Foundation's website: www.ezra-jack-keats.org/news/minigrant-application/

Summer Programming Materials

Since we have already had snow and daylight is dwindling, we are now thinking about the sun and warmth of next summer when most of the country's public libraries (including those in Vermont) will be hosting reading programs on the theme of night. This nighttime theme was developed by the Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP), a grassroots consortium of 50 member states and the District of Columbia. It includes a children's program, "Dream Big. Read," a young adult program, "Own the Night," and an adult program, "Between the Covers." The CSLP manual includes three sections promoting these programs, and, in addition, there is an early literacy section with ideas for library staff to use with preschoolers. The mailing includes:

 

  • The program manual with sections for all four age level programs, plus 3 DVDs which contain all the same information;
  • A catalog from Highsmith/Upstart featuring related incentives and printed materials;
  • DOL's order form for bookmarks, reading records, certificates and posters, all of which is provided at no cost to libraries;
  • A booklet listing summer performances available for libraries, with information for libraries on how to apply for a $100 grant to help pay for summer performance programming.

thisisteenlogo

The Publisher Scholastic has launched "This is Teen," an integrated initiative to connect teens with their favorite authors and books, while also building a community of readers. Components of the program include a dedicated Facebook page www.facebook.com/thisisteen and location-based mobile gaming technology via SCVNGR.   

 

The "This is Teen" Facebook page is a place where readers can connect and communicate with authors and other readers. Authors currently involved include: Libba Bray, Meg Cabot, Maggie Stiefvater, and Markus Zusak. The Facebook page also features author videos, blog entries, contests, trivia, giveaways, and highlights a wide selection of young adult authors and books published by Scholastic. For more information, go to: http://mediaroom.scholastic.com/thisisteen 

        checkitout

There are interesting trends emerging in literature for young adults. Here are some recommendations from Vermont's librarians who love this reading territory:

 

beautyqueen Rebecca Cook, Director, Poultney Public Library:

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray. When a corporate jet carrying the fifty contestants of the Miss Teen Dream Pageant crash lands on an apparently deserted island, the survivors are torn between perfecting their survival skills and practicing their pageant walk.  The young beauty queens are just beginning to discover unsuspected strength and skills in themselves when Bray throws in a beautifully ludicrous plot twist worthy of Carl Hiaasen or Dave Barry.  The story careens through a secret operations base located on the island, a pint sized Dictator with an Elvis obsession, a former Miss Teen Dream with Presidential aspirations, and a shipload of reality TV pirates.  Along the way readers are treated to parodies of today's commercial culture and celebrity obsession.  Bray offers a beautiful combination of fast-paced action and strong character development that make it hard to put down the book.

Read more 


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

This fall has been especially busy for me, and though much of my work is "behind the scenes" and not always visible to Vermont libraries, it is vitally important to the future of library service in our state.

I thought you'd be interested in reading about some of my activities and about discussions taking place that affect libraries at the state and national levels.

 

State of Vermont Strategic Planning: Since June the State of Vermont has been working on a strategic planning process that began with Governor Shumlin sharing his vision and priorities and which requires all State Agencies and Departments to develop a strategic plan by the end of the year. Over the past few months DOL (Department of Libraries) employees have been meeting to discuss our vision and priorities. Our department's new strategic plan, designed to align with the priorities set by the State leadership, has now been submitted to the Secretary of Administration for review. I expect to have the final plan approved by the end of December and will then make it available to the public.

 

Federal LSTA-5-Year Plan:  DOL is required to have a federally-approved LSTA 5-year Plan that shows how we will use federal LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) funds. Our current plan will end in 2012 and we must submit our new plan to the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) by the end of June. Before we begin to write our new plan, we must first undergo an evaluation of our current plan. DOL joined with 9 other states to hire Himmel & Wilson Library Consultants to conduct our evaluations and this month they conducted 4 separate independent focus group sessions with Vermont librarians, library trustees, and other stakeholders. I want to thank those of you who participated in these focus group meetings. The evaluation report will be finished this winter and I look forward to reading the results and recommendations. We will use this information as we write our new plan. To read our current LSTA plan, go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/lsta/vtlsta5yrplan2008-2012.pdf

 

Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA): State Librarians from across the country met in Santa Fe for their annual fall meeting to discuss everything from e-books to public access computing in libraries, to hear from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the American Library Association, the Institute of Museum and Library Services,the Government Printing Office,the National Library Service (for the blind), and representatives from other national organizations, and to do committee work.  I was part of a panel that reported on the work that IMLS is doing related to the LSTA program. Over the summer I participated in a series of working "web sessions" with IMLS and other state library agency representatives to explore the current range of services and programs funded by LSTA, and to identify the kinds of programs and services that we want LSTA to fund in the future. Those of you familiar with building "logic models" and "results chains" will have an inkling of what we have been doing. At both the state and federal levels, there is a growing need to show the results and impact of public funding. Vermont libraries can expect to see this reflected in new national benchmarks and new assessment tools to evaluate the impact of programs and services, especially in public libraries.

Vermont Board of Libraries:  The 7-member Board acts in an advisory capacity to the State Librarian, and is also responsible for naming geographic features in Vermont. On November 29 the Board  met for an all-day retreat facilitated by Library Consultant (and former DOL employee) Lawrence Webster.  We have an excellent Board with many new members and this retreat agenda proved to be a good combination of information, inspiration and aspiration.  The Board meets every other month and this retreat was the kick-off for the work they will be doing in the coming year. For information about the Board (including a group picture), go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/bol

 

Roles and Responsibilities of State Library Agencies:   Assistant State Librarian Christine Friese and I recently attended a 2-day meeting at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle where we participated in discussions about the changing role of state library agencies, the impact of reduced library funding, and effective advocacy for libraries.  States that have long relied on state funding for libraries have seen devastating cuts in the past couple of years and we know that these downward trends at the state level are mirrored in reduced municipal budgets and local fundraising. Presentations from the Pew Center on the States and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation helped us to understand the "big picture" of public and private funding and provided the groundwork for discussions on how we can work more effectively on behalf of libraries.

 

Join me at one of the stops on the "State Librarian's Tour":  I welcome you to come to one of my upcoming "tour" sessions so that you can hear from me about DOL projects and activities in more detail - and you can share with me your ideas and questions.  Your feedback is important as DOL moves into the coming year and plans for FY13 and beyond.

I hope to see you at one of these locations:

 

December 2: Martha Canfield Library, Arlington, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

                        528 E. Arlington Rd. www.marthacanfieldlibrary.org/

 

December 6: For CLONE (Cooperative Libraries of the Northeast) - 9:00 a.m.
                        Call Michael Roche for details (802-748-3428)
 

 

December 8: Rockingham Free Library, Bellows Falls, 10:00 am - noon.

http://rfpl.kohalibrary.com/

 

December 13: Milton Public Library, Milton - 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

www.milton.govoffice2.com/

Best Regards,

 

Martha Reid

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lowincomeComputers for Low-Income Families

In 2012 Microsoft and other technology partners will team up to deliver computers to low-income families. This is part of a program offered by a new non-profit collaborative called "Connect to Compete," created in partnership with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase adoption of high-speed Internet access and digital literacy skills in disadvantaged households across the country. To qualify for the program families must have at least one child enrolled in the free school lunch program. Program leaders estimate that 15 million families will qualify to receive a new computer. For more information: http://connect2compete.org/ Libraries will want to help spread the word about this program to community groups, students, and families.

 

In an announcement of this new initiative the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) stressed the importance of  and need for broadband adoption in American homes. Statistics show that the poor, minorities, and rural communities are placed at an economic and educational disadvantage due to lack of adequate Internet connectivity.

 

To see the FCC announcement and the list of "Connect to Compete" partners, and to read statistics and other findings, go to:

 

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ideasTips and Ideas 

Vermont Online Library Resources: Getting the Word Out

"If you build it they will come." A memorable quote, no doubt. But while that may be true for baseball fields, it doesn't necessarily apply to online library resources. Supplying resources is only half the battle --libraries must also find ways to effectively promote these resources to students and the general public. To help libraries promote the wealth of resources available in the Vermont Online Library, DOL has developed a plan to help Vermont Online Library subscribing libraries get the word out to their patrons. The plan includes press releases, PR materials (bookmarks, posters, etc.) web tools (widgets) and training. DOL is working with Gale/Cengage Learning, ProQuest and Recorded Books to help libraries use fun, informative and innovative ways to drive local usage to the Vermont Online Library Gale databases, Universal Class, and HeritageQuest. (Reminder: DOL provides free citizen access to the latter two products via their local public libraries only. HeritageQuest and Universal class are provided to all public libraries at no cost.)

 

Beginning in December, and continuing through 2012, DOL will put special focus on individual databases, subject areas or products included in the Vermont Online Library.

In December we will put the spotlight on products that help with workforce development activities: Gale's "Career Transitions" (school, public and academic libraries) and Recorded Books' "Universal Class" (public libraries.) We all know too well how the current economy has affected the lives of our citizens and communities. Libraries report a marked rise in the number of people asking for assistance in career exploration, job training, writing resumes, locating job opportunities, and submitting job applications.

 

"Career Transitions" specializes in career exploration, offering users information and self-assessment tools to discover career interests, identify opportunities based on previous work or military experience, and explore career paths, including "green" and "new economy" jobs.  In addition, users can find information about education and training, resume-writing guidance, and an interview simulation tool.

 

Universal Class offers free access to over 500 online classes, including (in addition to a variety of offerings for recreational and personal learning) classes to develop job skills or to help with job training. Citizens who take these classes work with online instructors, complete homework assignments and can earn continuing education credit and a certificate upon successful completion of coursework.

 

Watch for more information from the Department of Libraries in December.

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booksBooks for the Holidays

Libraries can help patrons with holiday shopping by offering book suggestions as gifts for family members and friends. When suggesting books as gifts, library staff will want to recommended books that are still in print. Some resources that lead the gift-giver to books beyond the bestseller list include: "Vermont Books 2011" and "Rapid Reviews 2011" at:  http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/misc

 

"Books for the Holidays" is a long-running cooperative effort between the Vermont Department of Libraries and  Across the Fence, the University of Vermont Extension program which airs weekdays at 12:10 p.m. on WCAX-TV, Channel 3. The December 5 program features Westford Public Library Director Victoria Tibbits and DOL's Amy Howlett. Program viewers may head to local libraries and bookstores for help in making their gift selections. The list of books reviewed on the December 5 program is available (as well as "Books for the Holidays" lists from previous years) at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/misc 

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scienceNew in the Library Science Collection at the State Library

ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference. American Library Association, 2011.   

 

Geek the Library: a Community Awareness Campaign: a Report to the OCLC Membership. OCLC, 2011.   

Holt, Leslie Edmonds. Public Library Services for the Poor: Doing All We Can. American Library Association, 2010.   

 

La Counte, Scott. Going Mobile: Developing Apps for your Library Using Basic HTML Programming.  American Library Association, 2012.   

 

Lavender, Kenneth. Book Repair: a How-to-do-it Manual.  Neal-Schuman Publishers Inc., 2011.   

 

Library Management Tips That Work. Carol Smallwood, editor. American Library Association, 2011.   

 

Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want: an OCLC Report.  OCLC, 2009.   

 

Perceptions of Libraries, 2010: Context and Community: a Report to the OCLC Membership. OCLC, 2011.

 

Smith, G. Stevenson. Cost Control for Nonprofits in Crisis. American Library Association, 2011.

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo

 

There are interesting trends emerging in literature for young adults. Here are some recommendations from Vermont's librarians who love this reading territory:

 

beautyqueen Rebecca Cook, Director, Poultney Public Library:

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray. When a corporate jet carrying the fifty contestants of the Miss Teen Dream Pageant crash lands on an apparently deserted island, the survivors are torn between perfecting their survival skills and practicing their pageant walk.  The young beauty queens are just beginning to discover unsuspected strength and skills in themselves when Bray throws in a beautifully ludicrous plot twist worthy of Carl Hiaasen or Dave Barry.  The story careens through a secret operations base located on the island, a pint sized Dictator with an Elvis obsession, a former Miss Teen Dream with Presidential aspirations, and a shipload of reality TV pirates.  Along the way readers are treated to parodies of today's commercial culture and celebrity obsession.  Bray offers a beautiful combination of fast-paced action and strong character development that make it hard to put down the book.

 

bbokjacketdeparturetime Ryan Deery, Children's Programming and Circulation Librarian, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier:

Departure Time, by Dutch author Truus Matti.The book relates the journey of one girl told through two stories. One tale comes from the realm of fantasy and is set in a hotel run by a talking fox and rat. The second narrative presents reminiscences of the narrator's time spent with her father. Like a puzzle, the two tales slowly come together into a wonderful account of love, loss, grief, guilt, and the passage of time. Despite its designation as "tween lit" (grades 5-8), its depth of metaphor and emotional complexity elevate this book, making it a great read for many ages.

 

bookjacketmachineofdeath Kat Redniss, Young Adult Librarian, Brownell Library, Essex Junction:

Machine of Death, a collection of stories edited by Ryan North, Matthew Bennardo, and David Malki. (Imagine me saying the title in a wild, deep, intense voice, comparable to the lead singer of a metal band!) The concept: an ironically-inclined machine that gives you a slip of paper describing how you will die. The catch: you don't know when or where you will die, and you can't even really trust what's written on the slip. For instance, your slip may say, "Old Age," and you think, "oh, look at me, living it up into my 90s!" Then, the next day, you get shot by an elderly man while walking your dog! Each story, named after a possible death, examines how a device like this would inexorably change how people exist in society. With stories titled, "Torn Apart and Devoured by Lions," "Piano," and "Killed by Daniel," this book is irresistible, amusing and extremely thought-provoking. So, enjoy, and keep an eye out for anyone named Daniel!

 

bookjacketsteampunk Samantha Maskell, Youth Services Librarian, Rockingham Free Public Library, Bellows Falls

Steampunk! An Anthology of Fantastically Rich and Strange Stories, edited by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant. Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction, fantasy, and alternate history involving a setting where steam power is still widely used, often set in Victorian-era Europe. This anthology includes fourteen fantastic stories from fourteen equally fantastic authors, including: M.T Anderson, Holly Black, Libba Bray, Cassandra Clare, Cory Doctorow, Garth Nix, and others. With a line-up of authors like this, there really is something for all interested readers - teen and adult alike. No two stories are similar and unlike other anthologies I've encountered, I found this entire collection to be interesting - not one weak story in the bunch.  I would easily recommend this title to existing Steampunk and sci-fi fans and to anyone looking for an introduction to the genre.

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imls