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In This Issue
How You Can Help Vermont Libraries
Photos Damaged by Storn Irene
Online Learning Launched @ VT Public Libraries
Best Small Library in America
Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act
Vermont Books Now Available in Digital Format
Free RDA Cataloging Webinars
Tips for Locating Obituaries and Articles
Materials Review Sessions: Please Note Changes
GMBA and DCF Discussion Sets
Check it out!
Continuing Education Program 2011

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New in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library 
Learn more
Borrow a Flip
Video Camera
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Helpful Links
Department of Libraries
VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
VT Humanities Council
VCAL
GMLC

VT Folklife Center

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topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

Summer has ended and the leaves are starting to show their colors, but the landscape of Vermont looks dramatically different than it did just a few short weeks ago for other reasons. Storm Irene brought heartbreaking damage across the southern part of our state and Vermonters are taking the first steps to reclaim their homes and communities. Our town libraries were remarkably lucky, though they didn't entirely escape the wrath of the storm. The worst hit was the West Hartford Public Library which is located near the White River. The flooding submerged the building's lower level destroying the children's room and ruining 60% of the library's collections on two floors. Many libraries reported wet carpets and basements and Jamaica, Stockbridge and Wilmington suffered other damage, but for the most part, libraries fared well. I have received no reports of damage to school or academic libraries.

The bigger story about libraries, I think, is what happened after the storm. My office received emails and phone calls from across the state and the nation with offers to help. The American Library Association called to get updates. Volunteers headed to West Hartford to clean out debris and secure the remaining book collection. The Norwich Bookstore set up a program to donate books; checks started arriving in the mail for the Vermont Public Library Foundation's "Emergency Relief Fund" and the Vermont Library Association started a fund to help Vermont librarians who suffered personal loss of homes and property. Read More 

How You Can Help Vermont Libraries

westhartford library book destruction

West Hartford Library book collection destroyed by Hurricane Irene (picture courtesy of Norwich Bookstore)

Vermont Public Library Foundation:  To make donations to the "Emergency Relief Fund" to assist Vermont public libraries that suffered damage or flooding as a result of Tropical Storm Irene, please send checks to: Vermont Public Library Foundation, c/o Vermont Department of Libraries, 109 State Street, Montpelier, VT 05609. Checks payable to: Vermont Public Library Foundation, Inc. These donations are tax deductible and will be distributed to libraries that have sustained damage from flooding. Funds will be used for repairs and renovation, mold abatement, clean-up and replacement of books, furniture and computers.

 

The Vermont Library Association's "Librarian Relief Fund" will  assist librarians who suffered personal property damages as a result of Tropical Storm Irene.  Many colleagues need financial support beyond what is offered them by governmental agencies. Contributions can be mailed to: Vermont Library Association, Attn: Librarian Relief Fund, P.O. Box 80, Burlington, VT 05402. For more information visit: http://www.vermontlibraries.org/  

 

Norwich Bookstore program for purchasing and donating books for the West Hartford Library. For more information, go to: http://www.norwichbookstore.com/

 

Friends of West Hartford Library. Information about donations at: http://www.hartford-vt.org/content/libraries/

  

To see a spreadsheet with information about individual libraries visit: http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/CurrentLibraryStatusReport.pdf

 

 

Photos Damaged by Storm Irene

Many Vermonters whose homes were flooded have been dealing with damage to personal papers and photographs. Take a look at these tips for cleaning damaged photos:

http://www.restorationsos.com/education/water-damage/recovering-from-water-damage/cleaning-repairing-and-disinfecting/clean-dry-repair-and-disinfect-paper/photos.asp

http://genealogy.about.com/od/photos/a/water_damage.htm

http://www.yesteryearmemories.com/water_damaged_photos.asp

Universal Class banner

Online Learning Launched @ VT Public Libraries 

Beginning this month, Vermont citizens have free access to over 500 online classes via Universal Class, a resource made available from Recorded Books, Inc. The Department of Libraries signed a two-year contract with Recorded Books and is making this service available at no cost to every public library in the state. Vermonters can access these classes in the library or from home by using their individual library barcode. The Department of Libraries used federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to pay for the first year of a two-year contract. Read more

 

Best Small Library in America Award

If your library has been thinking about applying for the annual Best Small Library in America Award, sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, now is the time to get to work. The postmark deadline for nominations for 2012 is November 2, 2011. For details, go to: www.libraryjournal.com/bestsmall  

teacher reading
Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA)

Good news for libraries! The U.S. Congress has passed a bill that amended the 2008 Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, designed to protect children from lead poisoning. Since 2008 libraries have been concerned that the Act would require testing of all children's books in library collections. The recent amendment excludes ordinary children's books and other paper-based printed materials and has no testing requirement of books produced before 1986. For more information visit:  http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/faq/101faq.html

Vermont Books Now Available in Digital Format

The National Library Service for the Blind & Physically Handicapped recently recorded two books for young readers which are of particular interest to Vermonters. These books are now available in digital book format for those with qualifying conditions registered with the Vermont Library for the Blind & Physically Handicapped in Berlin. For more information about this service, contact Teresa Faust, Head Librarian of DOL's Special Services Unit at: 828-3273 ; Toll Free: 1-800-479-1711

 

Katherine Paterson by John Bankston. DB 72315

This biography of award-winning children's author and Barre resident Katherine Paterson covers her personal life and career path from daughter of missionary parents to published author. The book also explains how the motivation to express her son's grief on losing a friend led her to create Bridge to Terabithia (DB/RC 48732), her first Newbery Medal book. For grades 5-8.

 

How Tia Lola Learned to Teach by Julia Alvarez. DB 73105

After Ta Lola reluctantly agrees to be a volunteer Spanish teacher in Juanita and Miguel's elementary school in Vermont, she quickly finds that taking the plunge was worth it. But then her visa expires. Sequel to How Ta Lola Came to (Visit) Stay (RC 53326). For grades 3-6.

Free RDA Cataloging Webinars 

The American Library Association is hosting several free webinars about the new cataloging code, RDA (Resource Description and Access), which will be implemented within the next year. The webinar "Introducing the RDA Toolkit Virtual User Group" will be held on Wednesday October 5, 2011 and is designed for beginners who need an introduction to the new code and toolkit. "RDA Toolkit Essentials" will be held on Wednesday, November 16, 2011 and is designed for those who already have some familiarity with RDA and would like to learn more. For information about the new code and webinars, refer to the RDA Toolkit website at: http://www.rdatoolkit.org/about

Tips for Locating Obituaries and Articles

Several helpful resources are available to help patrons find obituaries and newspaper articles in Vermont newspapers. One of the most useful sites is the Vermont Newspaper Project Catalog Database, http://vtnp.uvm.edu/, where locations of newspaper titles in repositories throughout the state are displayed by searching the place of coverage. Read more

Materials Review Sessions:  Please Note Changes   

Librarians please take note that the locations for three of the upcoming Materials Review Sessions have changed from previous years. In southern Vermont there will be just one program to be held at the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow.  There will not be sessions in either Killington or Kurn Hattin. The session in the Northeast Kingdom, formerly held at the Northeast Regional Library, will now be held at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

 Read more

 GMBA and DCF Discussion Sets Now Available

Teachers and librarians who want to get their students involved in DOL's statewide children's choice book award programs [Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Award for grades 4-8 and Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) for grades 9-12],  may want to borrow a set multiple copies of individual titles to use for book discussions. The Department of Libraries has 15 copies of each of the books nominated for the GMBA, as well as those DCF nominees that are currently available in paperback. DCF titles available in sets include: Jake by Audrey Couloumbis;  Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine; Belly Up by Stuart Gibbs; The Reinvention of Moxie Roosevelt by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel; Hero by Mike Lupica; The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shulman; Smile by Raina Telgemeier; and Price of Mist by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

 

Libraries must request books on the current GMBA and DCF lists directly from Linda Willis-Pendo at linda.willis-pendo@state.vt.us . These books have a 45-day loan period and may be reserved in advance. 
        checkitout

This month we contacted folks at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) to see what they are reading:

book jacket Colossus Patti Daniels, Senior Producer of Vermont Edition, recommends Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century by Michael Hiltzik (2010). "Part of the enjoyment of Hiltzik's book is his writing and storytelling. (You don't win a Pulitzer for nothing!) Exhaustively researched, he draws out characters, motives, entangled government objectives, majestic feats of engineering and human drama in detailing how this massive dam was built. But part of the enjoyment also come from imagining the endless hours Hiltzik must have expended toiling in dusty archives, reading memoirs and journals, and studying the newspapers and political histories of the period. No opportunity for tangent or footnote was passed by, and "Colossus" paints a complete picture of a bygone, but critical era."

Read more 


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

Summer has ended and the leaves are starting to show their colors, but the landscape of Vermont looks dramatically different than it did just a few short weeks ago for other reasons. Storm Irene brought heartbreaking damage across the southern part of our state and Vermonters are taking the first steps to reclaim their homes and communities. Our town libraries were remarkably lucky, though they didn't entirely escape the wrath of the storm. The worst hit was the West Hartford Public Library which is located near the White River. The flooding submerged the building's lower level destroying the children's room and ruining 60% of the library's collections on two floors. Many libraries reported wet carpets and basements and Jamaica, Stockbridge and Wilmington suffered other damage, but for the most part, libraries fared well. I have received no reports of damage to school or academic libraries.

The bigger story about libraries, I think, is what happened after the storm. My office received emails and phone calls from across the state and the nation with offers to help. The American Library Association called to get updates. Volunteers headed to West Hartford to clean out debris and secure the remaining book collection. The Norwich Bookstore set up a program to donate books; checks started arriving in the mail for the Vermont Public Library Foundation's "Emergency Relief Fund" and the Vermont Library Association started a fund to help Vermont librarians who suffered personal loss of homes and property.

The communication lines were open and people shared information, bulletins, Front Porch Forum postings, photos, and volunteer opportunities. Once again we learned the power of the Internet and social media to mobilize people where they were most needed. Volunteers arrived in towns carrying shovels, buckets, food and water and with offers to help. Many of us found ourselves looking at unimaginable scenes and doing work that we could not have thought possible. And libraries performed a vital role in their communities, providing needed information, access to phones, computers, and WiFi and offering a place of respite for neighbors to gather and connect with one another. I've heard some of your stories. I've talked with librarians who climbed over rocks and walked broken roads in order to get to the library and open the doors. I know that some of you opened your libraries extra hours to meet the needs of local residents. In Cavendish where the school was turned into a shelter, the library stayed open 24x7 providing Internet access for folks trying to reach family and friends and DVDs and games so that displaced families could find a bit of escape from what had happened to their homes. Librarians have been creative and pro-active about getting information out to community members - information about shelters, food, FEMA, and local volunteer efforts. The cultural/conservator's community provided us with information about handling wet paper and books and identifying damage to historic buildings. We have all benefited from the work of our colleagues at Vermont Preservation Trust, the State Archives, the VT Historical Society, the Conservator's Emergency Response Team (CERT), and others who are working on behalf of Vermont's cultural institutions.

I want to thank the Vermont library community for the outstanding work that you have been doing and for your dedication and compassion. Over the past few weeks many of us have witnessed firsthand the power of the library to make a difference in local communities. You have provided critical services in a time of real need: access to computers and phones, assistance with faxing and photocopying FEMA and insurance forms, a place of respite and community connection, and information and assistance. I have appreciated your phone calls and emails and hope that you will continue to tell me your stories and to ask for our help when needed. We have a long road ahead and I have no doubt that libraries will play a vital role in our state's recovery.

 

Martha Reid

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ucOnline Learning Launched @ VT Public Libraries

Beginning this month, Vermont citizens have free access to over 500 online classes via Universal Class, a resource made available from Recorded Books, Inc. The Department of Libraries signed a two-year contract with Recorded Books and is making this service available at no cost to every public library in the state. Vermonters can access these classes in the library or from home by using their individual library barcode. The Department of Libraries used federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to pay for the first year of a two-year contract.

 

Universal Class is an online learning service providing high quality courses for citizens (generally high-school age and older) interested in the lifelong pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons.  Courses cover a wide range - from hobbies (arts and crafts, dog training, photography) to job skills (writing improvement, medical billing, computer programming, domestic violence counseling) to education and test preparation (writing for children, general science, Algebra, Homeschooling Strategies) - and much more! Each class is self-paced with an instructor who interacts with students. Class curricula include homework assignments and students have up to six months to complete a class. For more information about Universal Class, go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/universalclass 

 

Libraries must register their barcodes in order to offer this service. To register, go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/barcodereg

 

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tipsTips for Locating Obituaries and Articles

Several helpful resources are available to help patrons find obituaries and newspaper articles in Vermont newspapers. One of the most useful sites is the Vermont Newspaper Project Catalog Database, http://vtnp.uvm.edu/, where locations of newspaper titles in repositories throughout the state are displayed by searching the place of coverage.

 

To use this site, click on the link "Search the Catalog" and, on the next screen, type the name of the town for which you are searching in the "Find this" box. Use the "Find Results In" box to highlight "place of coverage" and then click on the "Search" button. A subject heading for the town you are searching will appear with the number of associated newspaper titles. Or, if you don't find the name of the town, search for a larger nearby town or city that may have news and articles about the town in question. Click on the newspaper title(s) of interest within the date range desired. Bibliographic information is provided along with: (1) a list of repositories owning the newspaper, (2) the format (print or microfilm) available, and (3) the dates available. It is possible to make an interlibrary loan request at your local library for microfilm reels to view in your own town library, provided they have equipment available. Or call the Vermont State Library at 828-3268.

 

The Library of Congress Chronicling America website http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ now has several digitized Vermont newspapers available for full-text searching. Drop-down menus allow for searches by state and/or time period. Use search terms such as a person's name for an obituary or for a specific event and all available newspaper pages that contain the search terms will be displayed. The "zoom" feature allows for changes in print size; and "advanced search" allows the user to select and view individual newspaper titles.

 

Both of the websites listed above include Vermont newspaper content as a result of the Vermont Newspaper Project and its successor project, the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project. These projects have been made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The current Vermont Digital Newspaper Project in progress is a collaborative effort led by UVM. The Department of Libraries is a partner in that project.

 

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materialsMaterials Review Sessions:  Please Note Changes 

Librarians please take note that the locations for three of the upcoming Materials Review Sessions have changed from previous years. In southern Vermont there will be just one program to be held at the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow.  There will not be sessions in either Killington or Kurn Hattin. The session in the Northeast Kingdom, formerly held at the Northeast Regional Library, will now be held at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

 

The Materials Review Sessions feature Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene who orally reviews about 75 recently published children's and young adult books and displays hundreds more titles which have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books, with written reviews taped inside, are available for perusal so librarians can see the books before they place orders for their libraries.  Greene will do two "live" sessions of Materials Review this fall, one in Northfield and one at the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow; the other two sessions will be shown via a DVD recording. RETN will record the Northfield presentation and that recording will be shown in Milton and St. Johnsbury. Books will be available at all locations.

The program schedule:

 

Wednesday, October 26                          Brown Public Library, Northfield             LIVE!

Thursday, October 27                             Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow          LIVE! 

Wednesday, November 2                        Milton Public Library

Thursday, November 3                           St. Johnsbury Athenaeum                       

 

All programs begin at 9:00 a.m. Registration is not required. The presentation will also be streamed live on the RETN website http://www.retn.org/ and the accompanying bibliography will be available on the Department of Libraries' website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/mrs

 

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SCNew in the Library Science Collection 

Butler, Rebecca P.  Copyright for Teachers & Librarians in the 21st Century. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2011.

 

Conversations with Catalogers in the 21st Century. Libraries Unlimited, 2011.

 

Dewey, Melvil.  Dewey Decimal Classification and Relative Index.  OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., c2011.

 

Getting Started with Cloud Computing: a LITA Guide / edited by Edward M. Corrado, Heather Lea Moulaison; with a foreword by Roy Tennant.  Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2011.

 

Gorman, Michael.  Broken Pieces: a Library Life, 1941-1978.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

Griffiths, Jose-Marie.  A Strong Future for Public Library Use and Employment.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

Interlibrary Loan Practices Handbook.  Library Association, 2011.

 

Kane, Laura Townsend.  Working in the Virtual Stacks: the New Library & Information Science.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

Material Review, Spring 2011 [videorecording] / prepared and presented by the Vermont Department of Libraries.  South Burlington, VT: RETN Media Center, 2011.

 

Miller, Steven J.  Metadata for Digital Collections: a How-to-do-it Manual.  Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2011.

 

Murphy, Sarah Anne. The Librarian as Information Consultant: Transforming Reference for the Information Age.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

No Brief Candle: Reconceiving Research Libraries for the 21st Century.  Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources, 2008.

 

Outstanding Books for the College Bound: Titles and Programs for a New Generation.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

Recommended Reference Books for Small and Medium-sized Libraries and Media Centers. Libraries Unlimited, 2011.

 

Reed, Lori.  Workplace Learning & Leadership: a Handbook for Library and Nonprofit Trainers.  American Library Association, 2011.

 

Reference Reborn: Breathing New Life into Public Services Librarianship.  Libraries Unlimited, c2011.

 

Rubin, Richard.  Foundations of Library and Information Science. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo

 

This month we contacted folks at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) to see what they are reading:

 

book jacket Colossus Patti Daniels, Senior Producer of Vermont Edition, recommends Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century by Michael Hiltzik (2010). "Part of the enjoyment of Hiltzik's book is his writing and storytelling. (You don't win a Pulitzer for nothing!) Exhaustively researched, he draws out characters, motives, entangled government objectives, majestic feats of engineering and human drama in detailing how this massive dam was built. But part of the enjoyment also come from imagining the endless hours Hiltzik must have expended toiling in dusty archives, reading memoirs and journals, and studying the newspapers and political histories of the period. No opportunity for tangent or footnote was passed by, and "Colossus" paints a complete picture of a bygone, but critical era."

 

busy monstersMitch Wertlieb, Morning Edition host and reporter for VPR is reading Busy Monsters by first-time novelist William Giraldi. Wertlieb reports that "this is one of those books that can make you laugh out loud in unexpected and sporadic bursts as you read it. Its narrator is Charles Homar, a blogger/memoirist who reveals even his most embarrassing episodes to his faithful readers in weekly missives that range from the heartbreaking to the absurd. The plot revolves around Homar's quest to win back Gillian, the love of his life, who has left him for a Giant Squid hunter, and among his ill-fated attempts is one to find and capture the legendary Bigfoot. Fans of George Saunders, Philip Roth, and the Monty Python troupe will love this often hilarious yet heartfelt debut novel."

 

Jane Lindholm, host of Vermont Edition, is enjoying a marathon session of Russell Banks bookjacket sweet hearafternovels in preparation for an interview with the author on October 4.  "The first book I've picked up is The Sweet Hereafter. Set in an upstate New York town, it explores, through four separate narrators, how a town comes to terms with a horrific school bus crash that kills several children in the community.  When I finish that I'll reread Rule of the Bone, also set in upstate New York.  It follows Bone, a 14-year old drug dealer struggling to find his way.  Finally, I'll dive into his new novel, due out at the end of September, Lost Memory of Skin, set in Florida. Banks is able to capture gritty small town life without sentimentalizing it or turning his characters into caricatures.  And without patronizing his readers, Banks asks them to carefully examine their ideas of morality and compassion.  I'm eager to talk to the author about his creative process and his relationship to the landscape of upstate New York, where he lives part-time."

 

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FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera
The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that is available for Vermont public libraries to borrow. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using Flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has posted a loan policy on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/flipcameraloan

For more information about borrowing the Flip camera, call 802.828.3261 

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