childrenandlibraries
     
In This Issue
Retirement Reception for Lorraine Lanius
New Source for Book Reviews
NELA Conference in Burlington
National Gaming Day 2011
Vermont Library Substitute Pool
VT News @ Library of Congress
E-rate Training for FiberConnect Libraries
"Turning the Page" Free Advocacy Course
Libraries Explore Other Cultures and Regions
Early Literacy Initiative Update
Book Discussion Sets Available
Celebrate Teen Read Week
Continuing Education Program 2011

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NOV. 5, 2011 
 
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 From the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

For years there has been discussion in Vermont about developing a statewide integrated library system (ILS) that would include a shared, networked catalog of library holdings. An expanded version of that vision includes a state library card program that would give Vermonters access to libraries statewide as well as an expanded Vermont Online Library, with a robust collection of licensed online content accessible via the ILS. This vision may seem ambitious for Vermont, but it is happening in other states, most recently in Delaware:  http://lib.de.us/index.php/about/   I see such a project as a real opportunity for a partnership that includes the State of Vermont, Vermont municipalities, schools, colleges and special libraries.

 

In late July I sent out a letter to the directors of all Vermont public libraries to announce the launch of the Catamount Library Network. This pilot project brings together the Department of Libraries and five public libraries. Our goal is to develop an open-source integrated library system (ILS) designed as the first step toward a statewide shared ILS.

 

Below is the text of my letter. Read more

Retirement Reception for Lorraine Lanius

After more than 21 years with the Department of Libraries, Lorraine Lanius, Head of the DOL Technical Services Division, is retiring at the end of September. Library employees across Vermont know Lorraine for her outstanding work maintaining the online catalogs for the DOL collections (DOLcat), public libraries (PUBcat), and school libraries (K-12cat). In addition, many librarians have been students in her cataloging classes and workshops. We invite members of the Vermont library community and Vermont state government to drop in at a retirement reception on Wednesday, September 21, 2:00-4:00 p.m. in the Snelling room at the Vermont Historical Society Museum, Pavilion Building, 109 State Street, in Montpelier. For more information, contact Rita Robinson at: rita.robinson@state.vt.us 

 

New Source for Book Reviews

Owl Canyon Press offers a custom search tool to help readers find book reviews, author interviews and other book related articles and information. Using this feature, one can search over 100 online book-related journals and newspapers in a single search, including the American Book Review, the Bloomsbury Review, the Boston Review, the New York Review of Books, and many more sources. (Please note that the search requires Internet Explorer.)
Search online at:
http://www.owlcanyonpress.com/reviewsources.htm

NELA Annual Conference in Burlington

The New England Library Association (NELA) is holding its Annual Conference this year October 2- 4 at the Sheraton Hotel & Conference Center in Burlington. This year's conference is being held in cooperation with the Vermont Library Association (VLA), so VLA members may register for the Conference at the NELA member rate!

Some highlights of this year's NELA Annual Conference:
    -- 50+ sessions covering a wide range of topics for academic, public and school library staff
    -- Keynoter R. David Lankes, author of The Atlas of New Librarianship
    -- Post-Conference from WebJunction and other partners will address the increased demand on libraries for job-related assistance.
    -- Each conference meal includes a presentation by a well-known author
     -- More than 100 exhibitors
     -- NELA Reception and Games hosted by Burlington City Arts
     -- Dinner cruise aboard the Spirit of Ethan Allen

To qualify for Early Registration discounted rates, register by September 23. Visit the Conference webpage and register today:www.nelib.org/conference

nationalgamingdaylogoRegistration is officially open for National Gaming Day 2011 which will be held on November 12. This year's official sponsor for National Gaming Day @ your library, All Things Equal, Inc., is donating a limited supply of four games in support of gaming in libraries. For more information and to register, see: http://ngd.ala.org/  

Vermont Library Substitute Pool

Attention Vermont libraries! Have you heard about the Vermont Library Substitute Pool (VLSP)? The VLSP began as an experiment 3 years ago when John Payne, a member of the Vermont Consortium of Academic Libraries (VCAL), Stephanie Chase, from the Green Mountain Library Consortium (GMLC), and Helen Linda, a member of the Vermont Library Association (VLA) Executive Board, were ruminating at the same time on how to provide a substitute hiring service in Vermont that was low key but still provided a vehicle for library employers to be connected to potential subs and temps. Several people attended planning meetings and the VLSP was born. Read more 

VT News @ Library of Congress

The Vermont Digital Newspaper Project team is excited to finally see online the product of a year's work. The first batch of digitized historical Vermont newspaper content  is available at the Library of Congress Chronicling America website:

 http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/?state=Vermontðnicity=&language 

 

Tom McMurdo, Project Manager of the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, reports: "This is only the beginning--we will be adding tens of thousands more historical Vermont newspaper pages from titles all around the state to Chronicling America in the coming months." This project is funded with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

E-rate Training for FiberConnect Librariesusb cable

E-Rate Elite Services, Inc.,in conjunction with the Vermont Department of Libraries, will offer two one-day E-Rate workshops for public libraries participating in the Vermont FiberConnect broadband project. The Department of Libraries strongly recommends that all FiberConnect library directors attend - along with a library trustee.

What is E-Rate and why is it important?  "E-Rate" (short for "educational rate") provides discounts to schools and public libraries to help them obtain affordable telecommunications services and Internet access. Read more.

"Turning the Page": Free Advocacy Course 

Good news for libraries! The Public Library Association (PLA) is offering their celebrated "Turning the Page" advocacy training in a free guided online series of classes. This program is made possible nationwide by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The online course lasts 6 weeks and includes a weekly webinar facilitated by the PLA. During the 6 weeks, students will build their own Advocacy Work Plan.  This is a wonderful opportunity for library staff, trustees and community supporters. Registration for the next session opens September 15. Read more

Libraries Explore Other Cultures and Regions  

peopledancing

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library - Summer Program

 

Vermont libraries report that they love the theme and the graphics for this year's summer reading programs. The multicultural slogans of "One World, Many Stories" for children and "You are Here!" for teens have inspired librarians to be very creative in their programming and displays. The slogans and the coordinated reading records, posters, bookmarks, certificates and incentives are produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a 49-state partnership that brings high quality materials with low prices to its members. The Department of Libraries is a Collaborative member and funding for the Vermont program comes, in part, from federal LSTA grants made possible by the Insitute of Museum and Library Services. Read more.  

Vermont Early Literacy Initiative (ELI) Update

The Vermont Early Literacy Initiative is about to enter Phase Two, with the addition of 23 more libraries. This statewide initiative, a joint project of the Department of Libraries (DOL) and the Vermont Center for the Book (VCB) is based on research on how babies and toddlers learn. The project is made possible by a generous donation by Dr. Burnett Rawson to the Winnie Belle Learned Fund of the Vermont Public Library Foundation, and through a grant obtained by VCB from the Henderson Foundation. Read more

Book Discussion Sets Available 

Libraries and schools that need multiple copies of books for classes or discussion groups will find that the Department of Libraries has many sets to offer. The original collection of children's titles has been greatly expanded by the addition of Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) titles, which include both young adult and adult books. There are currently 178 titles ranging from titles for children (such as Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop and 11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass) to Young Adult offerings (such as Ellen Hopkins' Crank, three of John Green's titles) and adult titles (such as Life of Pi by Yann Martel and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.) Read more

teenweeklogoCelebrate Teen Read Week, October 16-22, 2011

The theme for Teen Read Week this year is "Picture It @ Your Library " and libraries planning to participate are urged to sign up on the American Library Association website at http://www.ala.org/teenread Registration is free, and every registrant will receive a resource kit and access to a 60 minute webinar which has ideas for programs, contests, displays and events. Teen Read Week is an excellent time to booktalk titles on the Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) list to introduce Vermont teens to fabulous books. To see the list of  GMBA titles and for more information, see:  http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/gmba   


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

For years there has been discussion in Vermont about developing a statewide integrated library system (ILS) that would include a shared, networked catalog of library holdings. An expanded version of that vision includes a state library card program that would give Vermonters access to libraries statewide as well as an expanded Vermont Online Library, with a robust collection of licensed online content accessible via the ILS. This vision may seem ambitious for Vermont, but it is happening in other states, most recently in Delaware: http://lib.de.us/index.php/about/  I see such a project as a real opportunity for a partnership that includes the State of Vermont, Vermont municipalities, schools, colleges and special libraries.

 

In late July I sent out a letter to the directors of all Vermont public libraries to announce the launch of the Catamount Library Network. This pilot project brings together the Department of Libraries and five public libraries. Our goal is to develop an open-source integrated library system (ILS) designed as the first step toward a statewide shared ILS.

 

Below is the text of my letter; as you will see, we are moving forward with this project and expect the network to be up and running sometime in 2013. Take a look, and feel free to contact me with any questions, comments or ideas you may have.

 

Introduction and Vision

I am writing to tell you about an exciting new pilot project established by the Department of Libraries (DOL) in partnership with five public libraries. The Pilot Project is operating under the name of Catamount Library Network.

 

Many of you know that I came to the position of State Librarian in 2008 with the vision of establishing a statewide integrated library system, connecting multi-type libraries across the state via a shared online catalog and with a state library card. It is an ambitious goal, and in my conversations with many of you and with librarians in other states, I was able to see more clearly how this could work in Vermont. The Catamount Library Network Pilot Project is the first step in this process. We face significant challenges on a project like this, including rapid changes in library technology and both short-term and long-term funding, but I believe that a shared statewide system that includes the Department of Libraries is an essential step in building quality 21st century library service for all Vermonters.

 

Since 1986 the Department of Libraries has been responsible for the online statewide union catalog of library holdings. Partnering with local public libraries, we now have a catalog with more than 730,000 bibliographic records. Upgrades to the Vermont Automated Library System (VALS) and the Web2 catalog have improved the system over time, but we can all agree that the current system is no longer adequate. The percentage of local libraries that have automated systems has steadily increased. DOL consultants have worked with librarians and trustees on individual library automation projects across the state. In addition, we have been excited to see the emergence of open source library networking in the Green Mountain Library Consortium's VOKAL Koha project. The Catamount Library Network automation project will build on what we have learned here in Vermont and also upon successful models of regional and statewide systems in other parts of the country. Along the way, decisions will be made with the intent to connect libraries across the state with the Department of Libraries and a statewide interlibrary loan network. The purpose of the Catamount Library Network is to build a statewide collaborative integrated library system that will meet the legal and administrative requirements of participation by the Department of Libraries. Our vision is that this network will eventually be open to all Vermont public, school, academic and special libraries. 

 

Pilot Project

Last fall I was approached separately by two public library directors asking if and when the Department of Libraries would begin such a project. They expressed interest in being part of a pilot program, with the Department of Libraries taking the initial lead. I decided that the time was right to take the first step and so we formed a small working group of libraries to look at the possibility of a pilot project. Based on conversations with librarians in other states who were involved in similar projects, I made the decision to start small with five public libraries participating in the initital pilot program.  I approached several library directors, looking for libraries that wanted to change their current ILS system, were willing to give time for meetings and planning, were able to identify and commit their financial resources to the project, and were (for the most part) located geographically near to one another to make it easier to attend meetings.

 

The five libraries in the pilot program are:

  • Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro
  • Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow
  • Rutland Free Library
  • Springfield Town Library
  • Waterbury Public Library

Catamount Library Network

Membership for now is limited to the five libraries listed above. Our goal is that the pilot libraries will be up and running with the new shared ILS in 2013. It is also our goal to establish a non-profit member organization that includes the Department of Libraries that will govern the future growth and development of the Catamount Library Network. Once that is accomplished Catamount Library Network plans to open membership to interested libraries in hopes of reaching our goal of a statewide multi-library networked system.

 

As you might guess, we have a lot of work to do and a myriad of decisions ahead of us. Our first task is to choose an open source ILS system that will meet our requirements for a statewide consortial system of multi-type libraries.  We are looking closely at both the Koha and Evergreen open source integrated library systems.

 

To help us in this selection process:

  • We met with librarians from Bibliomation, Inc., an Evergreen consortial system in Connecticut:  http://biblio.org/ ;
  • We met with Nora Blake, Manager of MassCat, a Koha consortial system in Massachusetts:  http://www.masscat.org/
  • Group members attended the spring 2011 VOKAL (Koha) open house sponsored by the Green Mountain Library Consortium:  http://gmlc.wordpress.com/koha-project/ ;
  • Jerry Carbone (Brooks Memorial Library) and Sheila Kearns (DOL) attended the Evergreen International Conference: http://pines.georgialibraries.org/evergreen2011/ ;
  • I attended a session on open-source consortial systems at the American Library Association conference in June 2011 and have spoken with representatives from similar systems in several states;
  • We are in the process of hiring a consultant to conduct a detailed comparison study of the two open-source systems, Koha and Evergreen.

Some of you may have questions about the Catamount Library Network. For more information, feel free to contact me at martha.reid@state.vt.us, or others who are taking part in the Catamount Library Network Pilot Project:

 

Rob Geiszler, Department of Libraries: rob.geiszler@state.vt.us

Sheila Kearns, Department of Libraries: sheila.kearns@state.vt.us 

Paula Baker, Director, Rutland Free Library: paulajb@rutlandfree.org 

Jerry Carbone, Director, Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro: jerry@brooks.lib.vt.us 

Mary Kasamatsu, Director, Waterbury Public Library: mary@waterburypubliclibrary.com

Russ Moore, Director, Springfield Town Library: springfieldlibrary@hotmail.com

Jill Tofferi, Director, Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow:  fmlibrary@comcast.net

           

With a shared vision and with our collective knowledge and hard work, I believe that in time we will be able to achieve our goal of a statewide integrated library system. To do so would be to provide a much-needed service to Vermont citizens.

 

Martha Reid

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PoolVermont Library Substitute Pool

Attention Vermont libraries! Have you heard about the Vermont Library Substitute Pool (VLSP)? The VLSP began as an experiment 3 years ago when John Payne, a member of the Vermont Consortium of Academic Libraries (VCAL), Stephanie Chase, from the Green Mountain Library Consortium (GMLC), and Helen Linda, a member of the Vermont Library Association (VLA) Executive Board, were ruminating at the same time on how to provide a substitute hiring service in Vermont that was low key but still provided a vehicle for library employers to be connected to potential subs and temps. Several people attended planning meetings and the VLSP was born.

Current numbers show that the Pool has great participation. Thirty-one potential employers have access to a list of 109 participants representing every county in Vermont. People who wish to be on the list of participants need simply fill out the
VLSP Form on the VLA website. This information will be kept for one year in a spreadsheet available to potential employers. For access to this spreadsheet, libraries (employers) should send an email to Helen Linda, Systems & Tech Services Librarian at Goddard College, at: vermontlibrarieswebmaster@gmail.comIn order to protect the privacy of the participants, only one person from any given library is allowed access and should ideally be the Director, a trustee or another person responsible for hiring decisions.

The program is only good if it really works, so if your library has made a successful connection via VLSP, please let Helen Linda know.  You can also contact her if you have questions, thoughts or suggestions about the Pool.  

 

We encourage you to spread the word to other libraries about this program.  

 

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e-rateE-rate Training Sessions for FiberConnect Libraries

E-Rate Elite Services, Inc.,in conjunction with the Vermont Department of Libraries, will offer two one-day E-Rate workshops for public libraries participating in the Vermont FiberConnect broadband project. The Department of Libraries strongly recommends that all FiberConnect library directors attend - along with a library trustee.

 

What is E-Rate and why is it important?  "E-Rate" (short for "educational rate") provides discounts to schools and public libraries to help them obtain affordable telecommunications services and Internet access.  The E-rate Program is a critical source of funding for the FiberConnect project and these workshops are supported with an Opportunity Online Broadband grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

In addition to learning about the E-Rate program that has been designed for FiberConnect libraries, attendees will get the latest news about the FiberConnect project from State Librarian, Martha Reid. 

 

Dates & Locations:   Libraries should attend one of these sessions:

August 31, 2011 at Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow

September 1, 2011 at  Aldrich Library, Barre

Time:  Coffee and networking time: 9:00 am

Workshop: 9:30 am - 3:00 pm

Lunch and snacks will be provided at each of the workshops.  

For special dietary needs please contact Michael Roche at:  michael.roche@state.vt.us .

 

Registration: E-rate Workshop for Vermont FiberConnect- Libraries - Ludlow  

                 E-rate Workshop for Vermont FiberConnect - Libraries - Barre

 

For more information, contact Michael Roche at 748-3428 / michael.roche@state.vt.us .

The workshops are sponsored with an Opportunity Online Broadband Grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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turning"Turning the Page": Free Advocacy Course

Good news for libraries! The Public Library Association (PLA) is offering their celebrated "Turning the Page" advocacy training in a free guided online series of classes. This program is made possible nationwide by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The online course lasts 6 weeks and includes a weekly webinar facilitated by the PLA. During the 6 weeks, students will build their own Advocacy Work Plan.  This is a wonderful opportunity for library staff, trustees and community supporters. Registration for the next session opens September 15.

 

DOL Consultant Michael Roche and a group of Vermont librarians, trustees and Friends participated in the original "live" version of this training in St. Louis, Missouri and reported that it was a fantastic experience. Now all interested Vermonters are able to take the course online - at no cost.

  • What is advocacy? For the purposes of this training, advocacy includes "building strategic partnerships with local groups, developing effective approaches that demonstrate and communicate a library's value, and delivering messages about the importance of libraries."
  • Why is this important for Vermont? Vermont continues to face many serious economic and societal challenges and our libraries provide essential services to citizens and help build strong communities. In order for libraries to thrive in a time of budget cuts and competing spending priorities, we must be more effective in communicating the value of our libraries. Through the work of citizen advocacy we can ensure that our libraries are adequately funded and staffed to offer services that promote and support economic and workforce development, basic literacy and digital literacy, an informed citizenry, personal and cultural enrichment and life-long learning, and use of e-Government and other online information resources.
  • Who should participate?  "Turning the Page" is open to ANYONE and we especially encourage librarians, trustees and Friends of the Library to take advantage of this opportunity. During the next year DOL will work to build a statewide library advocacy network.  This course is a good base for developing this network and for further discussions and programs to strengthen our libraries through advocacy activities.
  • What should you do? If you are a library staff member, trustee, Friend, or a community supporter who wants quality library service and healthy communities, we invite you to work the "Turning the Page" course into your schedule.

The PLA online course is available for free in a facilitated manner three times:

  • Week of October 31- Week of December 12, 2011
  • Week of March 19- Week of April 23, 2012
  • Week of June 25-Week of August 6, 2012

In addition to the facilited series, a self-paced series is available at any time to members of the American Library Association (ALA) at: [See bottom of page at: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/pla/education/turningthepage/about.cfm]

 

Note: The PLA estimates participants will want to spend about 3 hours per week on the course over the 6 week period. The Department of Libraries hopes to see at least one person from every Vermont public library complete this course.

 

Need more information? Contact your library's regional consultant or Assistant State Librarian Christine Friese at 802-828-2714 / christine.friese@state.vt.us, or visit the PLA "Turning the Page" website at: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/pla/education/turningthepage/about.cfm

 

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summerLibraries Explore Other Cultures and Local Regions This Summer

Vermont libraries report that they love the theme and the graphics for this year's summer reading programs. The multicultural slogans of "One World, Many Stories" for children and "You are Here!" for teens have inspired librarians to be very creative in their programming and displays. The slogans and the coordinated reading records, posters, bookmarks, certificates and incentives are produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a 49-state partnership that brings high quality materials with low prices to its members. The Department of Libraries is a Collaborative member and funding for the Vermont program comes, in part, from federal LSTA grants made possible by the Insitute of Museum and Library Services.

 

Here is a small sampling of activities in libraries across the state:

 

Hartland Public Library:  Lunchtime Tuesdays: activities included African masks, origami, Indian scroll paintings, boat building, and monster making. For the teen group there was a week-long video camp with book trailers, African masks, and batik/tie-dying.

 

Goodrich Memorial Library, Newport: Librarian Carol Nicholson made 12 "suitcases" from cardboard boxes decorated to showcase 12 different countries. Each "suitcase" contains books, games, DVDs, puzzles, trinkets, etc. depicting a specific country. Children and families can check these out - and they have been very popular.

                                                                                                    

Rockingham Free Library, Bellows Falls sponsored a teen program featuring role-playing games in which participants built worlds and did communal storytelling. The library also held family programs on Kamishibai storytelling and Native American stories, drumming and song. 

 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington had one of their best summers ever, with record numbers of kids participating. All together there were over 1,320 participants this year who read over 13,000 hours, including children and teens at their numerous outreach sites.

 

Davies Memorial Library, Lower Waterford combined several cultures in their finale program by reading stories about cultural celebrations, making Chinese lanterns and Greek masks, and featuring a piņata.

 

Several libraries asked patrons to mail in postcards from their summer travels or contacted libraries in other states and countries. Townshend Public Library, for instance, received many postcards and special letters from around the world. Among their favorites was a packet from the Albany Village Library in Auckland, New Zealand which included a letter and some pictures with a recurring theme of chickens.  Their note explains that the chickens were on a farm in the village before it was developed and that they remain today in the park next to the Library.  Townshend also received a very touching letter from a woman in central Japan who wrote about the terrible disaster that occurred in her country earlier this year with more than 20,000 people losing their lives.  She wanted to be sure that Vermont children knew that, "our people in the U.S. did  great support and help for the victims of the disaster and that she would like the children in Japan not to forget what our country has done to save their country."  She included her own beautiful hand-made origami cranes.

 

Library displays can make a difference, too. Nancy Rumery from the Haskell Library, Derby Line relates this anecdote:  "An older couple visiting the area told me how much they appreciated the book display in the library entryway. While raising their now grown children, adopted from Haiti, they found it difficult to find books illustrated with children of color. They wanted me to know that my display touched them and was really meaningful to them. They came back a few days later, thanked me again and popped a little something into the donation box."

 

Why are these programs so fabulous and well attended? Because we have terrific librarians in Vermont!  Gail Martin, a presenter who conducts origami programs, says it beautifully: "I've been to over a dozen libraries in July. Each library is different. I've visited old libraries, new libraries, big ones and small, automated and not, well-funded and financially struggling. In every library, I have been met by a children's librarian who is warm and welcoming, and has home-town pride and enthusiasm! I have also been impressed by what each library has to offer to youngsters for their summer program. Can I also say that I feel like I have met and made so many new friends in all towns! What a fine state, and what a dedicated and talented group of professionals we have in the libraries of Vermont!"

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eli Vermont Early Literacy Initiative (ELI) Update

The Vermont Early Literacy Initiative is about to enter Phase Two, with the addition of 23 more libraries. This statewide initiative, a joint project of the Department of Libraries (DOL) and the Vermont Center for the Book (VCB) is based on research on how babies and toddlers learn. The project is made possible by a generous donation by Dr. Burnett Rawson to the Winnie Belle Learned Fund of the Vermont Public Library Foundation, and through a grant obtained by VCB from the Henderson Foundation.

 

Librarians from the first year's group of thirty libraries have attended three trainings, added early literacy components to their storytimes, held programs for parents to teach them about early literacy and conducted training for childcare providers. The trainings combine elements of the Beginning with Mother Goose Program (VCB) and the American Library Association's Every Child Ready to Read program.

 

Feedback from this project has shown that it is nothing short of life-changing:   

  • Storytimes have become more focused, purposeful and dynamic. One librarian reported, "My storytimes transformed into dynamic experiences!  All of my programming is interactive now.  I have more confidence in presenting programming."
  • Collaborations between the library and other agencies serving children have increased: One example: "Better connection with local Headstart and exciting plans to host and participate in new playgroup that our local health clinic hopes to launch."
  • Parents have learned how better to interact with their children and foster their learning. One young mother revealed that she had never known that it was important to talk to her baby until she attended an ELI program.
  • Caregivers have learned new information and discovered books and activities to use with their children.

The libraries chosen (through an application process) to participate in the 2011-2012 program :



Barton Public Library

Barton

Rockingham Free Public Library

Bellows Falls

Bradford Public Library

Bradford

Brooks Memorial Library

Brattleboro

Whiting Library

Chester

Essex Free Library

Essex

Fairlee Public Library

Fairlee

Glover Public Library

Glover

Greensboro Free Library

Greensboro

Hartford Library

Hartford

Davies Memorial Library

Waterford

Fletcher Memorial Library

Ludlow

Ilsley Public Library

Middlebury

Milton Public Library

Milton

Montgomery Town Library

Montgomery

Morristown Centennial Library

Morrisville

Brown Public Library

Northfield

Poultney Public Library

Poultney

So. Burlington Community Library

S. Burlington

Stowe Free Library

Stowe

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library

Williston

Glee Merritt Kelley Comm. Library

Wolcott

Norman Williams Public Library

Woodstock

  

A steering committee, consisting of Cheryl Cox, Springfield Town Library; Deborah Gadwah-Lambert, Alice WardLibrary in Canaan; Beth Reynolds, Norwich Public Library, Sally Anderson and Wendy Martin, VCB, and Grace Greene, DOL, have been guiding this project since its inception. For more information see: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/eli.

 

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BOOKBook Discussion Sets Available  

Libraries and schools that need multiple copies of books for classes or discussion groups will find that the Department of Libraries has many sets to offer. The original collection of children's titles has been greatly expanded by the addition of Green Mountain Book Award (GMBA) titles, which include both young adult and adult books. There are currently 178 titles ranging from titles for children (such as Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop and 11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass) to Young Adult offerings (such as Ellen Hopkins' Crank, three of John Green's titles) and adult titles (such as Life of Pi by Yann Martel and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.)

 

Each year the Department of Libraries purchases 15 copies of each of the books nominated for the GMBA award (see http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/gmba ), as well as the Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) nominees currently available in paperback. Currently DOL has available these titles from the current DCF list: Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine, Belly Up by Stuart Gibbs, The Reinvention of Moxie Roosevelt by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel, Hero by Mike Lupica, The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shuman, Smile by Raina Telegemier and Price of Mist by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

 

Libraries must request the books on the current GMBA and DCF lists directly from Linda Willis-Pendo at linda.willis-pendo@state.vt.us. These sets circulate for a 45 day loan period and may be reserved ahead. Libraries may borrow all other discussion books by requesting them through interlibrary loan.  For each title desired, send one web2 request to lib.ill@state.vt.us.  Include the number of copies needed in the "comments" box.  Discussion books circulate for 60 days.

 

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FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera
The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that is available for Vermont public libraries to borrow. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using Flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has posted a loan policy on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/flipcameraloan

For more information about borrowing the Flip camera, call 802.828.3261 

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imls