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In This Issue
Vermont Blind Readers Embrace Digital Format
5 Libraries Receive -VT Equipment
Global Virtual Library Conference 2011
Ask Us Who We Are
A Day for Library Friends 2011
Library Outreach: Summer 2011
New Members of the Vermont Board of Libraries
Materials Review Sessions: Fall Dates and Places
Promoting Literacy: VPT and DOL
Brooks Memorial Library Featured on Tech Soup
Vermont Awards in School Library Journal
Check it out!
Continuing Education Program 2011

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 From the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarianI love summer in Vermont and one of my great pleasures is to sit in the back yard under a big shady maple tree on a hot day and sip iced tea and read. Judging by all the "summer reading" lists out there we know that summer can be a time of a particular kind of reading. For some that means catching up on all the meaty (or even weighty) books they came across during the winter and didn't have time to read. For others it means pure escapism. Lazy days spent on the shores of Lake Champlain or by a favorite swimming hole call for "beach reads," those fast-paced thrillers and other page-turners, fluffy romances, or light mysteries. This summer I am racing through the series of mysteries by Michael Dibdin set in Italy and featuring detective Aurelio Zen. I began to read these books in advance of the new Masterpiece Theatre series (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/zen/index.html) and now want to read them all. In order to read them quickly I have violated my rule of reading series titles in order, but this has not diminished the fun. Read More 

Vermont Blind Readers Embrace Digital Format

Vermonters who use the "talking book" service provided by the Vermont Library for the Blind & Physically Handicapped are turning to the new digital format a bit faster than readers in other states. In an informal poll conducted on a listserv for librarians that serve the blind, the librarians were asked to calculate the percentage of digital books among all of the recordings (including both digital and the older cassette editions) that they mailed out during the month of June. In Vermont, 61% of the "talking books" mailed out to patrons were digital books. This is a higher percentage than was reported by several other states, including (northern) California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Washington. (Not all states participated in the poll.) This figure does not consider the additional number of digital books that patrons downloaded directly from the National Library Service for the Blind & Physically Handicapped. In June, Vermont patrons downloaded just over 10% of the total number of "talking books" that were sent by mail.

5 Libraries Receive e-VT Equipment

State Librarian Martha Reid recently delivered computer equipment to four libraries as part of the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project, and a fifth library will receive equipment later this month. The equipment, made possible with funding from a federal Broadband Technology Opportunities (BTOP) grant, will provide library patrons with greater access to Internet resources as well as increase the libraries' capacity to provide training and licensed online content to local residents.

 

Libraries receiving equipment include: Alburgh Public Library, North Hero Public Library, Grand Isle Free Library, and the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow (photographs of the deliveries are in the Newsletter banner above in the order the libraries are listed from left to right). Reid will deliver equipment to the Lawrence Memorial Library in Bristol on July 27. Equipment includes desktop and laptop computers, printers, scanners, wireless routers, netbooks, and iPads.

 

For more information about the e-Vermont project, go to: http://e4vt.org/

Global Virtual Library Conference 2011
The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San José State University has scheduled the Library 2.011 worldwide virtual conference for November 2 - 3, 2011. The conference will be held online, in multiple time zones, over the course of two days, and will be free to attend.

The Library 2.011 conference will be a unique chance to participate in a global conversation on the current and future state of libraries. Subject strands will include the changing roles of libraries and librarians, the increasing impact of digital media and the e-book revolution, open educational resources, digital literacy, shifts from information consumption to production (Web 2.0), multimedia and gaming spaces, libraries as community centers, the growth of individualized and self-paced learning, the library as the center of new learning models, understanding users in the digital age, assessing service delivery, and defining leadership and information professional careers in a networked and changing world. Read more.

Ask Us Who We Are:  

A New Film about Youth in Foster Careposteraskuswhoweare

Thanks to a generous donation by the Vermont Department for Children and Families, public libraries in Vermont will soon (within the next few weeks) be receiving a free DVD copy of this important documentary. Along with the DVD, libraries will also receive a poster about the film and materials that let people know how they can help children and youth in foster care.   

 

Directed by Bess O'Brien, Ask Us Who We Are is about the search for home, community, and the transformative power of love in the midst of fractured and often broken lives. It breaks open stereotypes and gives voice to those who are often not heard. For more information about the film, please call Pam Piper at (802) 241-2231.  

A Day for Library Friends 2011

seniorFriends of the Library members from across Vermont met at the Aldrich Library in Barre on June 4 to swap ideas, listen to peers and plan for the future. Myke Esposito of Friends of the South Burlington Community Library started off the morning panel with her advice on how to run a conflict-free Friends group. Following her lead, Marti Fiske of the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library in Williston suggested ten ideas for better communication. Wondering how Vermont public library fundraising compares to other states? Read more.

Library Outreach: Summer 2011

kidsreadingsummer 

It's summer and a good time for public libraries to expand services beyond the library building. Several libraries offer mobile bookmobile services. Find more about these programs at:   http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/vtbookmobiles11update.pdf 

 

But that's not the only way to reach out to community members. It's easy to do outreach with the most basic equipment. Here are some suggestions for libraries: Read more 

New Members of the Vermont Board of Libraries
Governor Shumlin has completed making appointments to the seven-member state Board of Libraries. The newest appointees are Deborah Granquist of Weston and Lucy Comstock-Gay of New Haven. The Board of Libraries serves "in an advisory capacity to the state librarian" (22 VSA § 602) and also has authority for naming roads and other geographic locations (10 VSA § 152).

In addition to Granquist and Comstock-Gay, Board members are: Linda Williamson (Chair), Hartland; Jim Gish, Middlebury; Bruce Post, Essex; Josh Fitzhugh, Berlin; and Ariel Wengroff, Burlington. For more information and to find minutes of Board meetings, see: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/bol

Materials Review Sessions:  Fall Dates and Places 

Once again DOL will sponsor the ever-popular Materials Review Sessions featuring reviews of recently published books for children and young adults. School and public librarians are invited to attend one of four sessions to be held this fall. Because attendance has lessened at the two regular southern locations, DOL will combine these into one program to be held at the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow. There will no longer be sessions in either Killington or Kurn Hattin. The session in the Northeast Kingdom, formerly held at the Northeast Regional Library, will now be held at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. Read more

Promoting Literacy: VPT and DOL Partnership

The Department of Libraries has a new partnership with Vermont Public Television based on their shared mission to promote literacy.  For the first joint project, Kathryn Scott, VPT Chief Content Officer, and a film crew attended the Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Ceremony at Vermont Technical College on June 1 and interviewed Wendy Mass, the winning author of 11 Birthday, as well as several young readers who came to hear Mass speak.  

Read more

Brooks Memorial Library Featured on Tech Soup
Jerry Carbone, Director of the Brooks Memorial Library in Brattleboro, was recently featured in a Tech Soup for Libraries article called "A Resourceful Approach; Creative Spending, Fundraising, and Organizing for Maintaining Library Systems." Read the online article here:
http://www.techsoupforlibraries.org/spotlight/a-resourceful-approach
Vermont Awards in the School Library Journal

11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass is the winner of the 2011 Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award. School Library Journal has published an article about this and other Vermont children's and teen book awards and the 2011 winners. Check it out at: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/slj/home/891231-312/wendy_masss_11_birthdays_wins.html.csp  


        checkitout

What does a children's book author read for fun? We asked several Vermont authors what they are reading this summer and got quite an eclectic mix of responses: 

 Essays of E.B. White bookjacketAnna Dewdney, author and illustrator of the bestselling picture book Llama, Llama, Red Pajama and sequels writes, "I have been reading and re-reading Essays of E.B. White.  His gentle, loving, humorous take on everything from politics to raccoons simply cheers and soothes me.  I wish so much that I had met him."

Read more 


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

I love summer in Vermont and one of my great pleasures is to sit in the back yard under a big shady maple tree on a hot day and sip iced tea and read. Judging by all the "summer reading" lists out there we know that summer can be a time of a particular kind of reading. For some that means catching up on all the meaty (or even weighty) books they came across during the winter and didn't have time to read. For others it means pure escapism. Lazy days spent on the shores of Lake Champlain or by a favorite swimming hole call for "beach reads," those fast-paced thrillers and other page-turners, fluffy romances, or light mysteries. This summer I am racing through the series of mysteries by Michael Dibdin set in Italy and featuring detective Aurelio Zen. I began to read these books in advance of the new Masterpiece Theatre series (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/zen/index.html ) and now want to read them all. In order to read them quickly I have violated my rule of reading series titles in order, but this has not diminished the fun.

   

I am always interested in finding out what's on the lists of other readers, and now that I no longer read reviews and select books for a library collection, I rely on these lists more and more. This month we asked some Vermont authors what they are reading this summer and you'll find the results in this newsletter. Their selections are diverse and some titles were new to me. A few titles will get added to my own list of future reads. I am also interested in seeing the summer reading lists of subject experts and presidents (remember Bill Clinton's prodigious lists?) and the titles that colleges require incoming freshmen to read: http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/1160898-summer-reading-freshmen-2011-a-4.html . I add to the mix the suggestions that come from NPR (  http://www.npr.org/series/summer-books/ ), the New York Times ( http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/summer-at-the-book-review-what-were-reading/ ), independent booksellers ( http://www.indiebound.org/indie-bestsellers ), and the displays in my local library.

Summer can also be a time to read (or re-read) the classics. This summer I am planning to re-read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a book I have not picked up since high school, and which is one of several books touted as "the great American novel." I recently met up with some old friends from New York City, one a writer and the other a literary agent, and told them of my plans. Both confessed that they had never read Gatsby. Well, I said, this is the perfect season to track down a copy and start reading!

Happy summer reading!

Martha Reid

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adayA Day for Library Friends 2011

Friends of the Library members from across Vermont met at the Aldrich Library in Barre on June 4 to swap ideas, listen to peers and plan for the future. Myke Esposito of Friends of the South Burlington Community Library started off the morning panel with her advice on how to run a conflict-free Friends group. Following her lead, Marti Fiske of the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library in Williston suggested ten ideas for better communication. Wondering how Vermont public library fundraising compares to other states? Ryan Torres of the Vermont Community Foundation (VCF) reviewed the charts and revealed that there is room for growth in personal giving here in Vermont. For an analysis of Vermont giving trends, take a look at the VCF report at: http://www.understandingvt.org/storage/NPReportRevised2011.pdf. Torres reminded Friends that the Vermont Community Foundation is eager to work with them.

 

For a list of Vermont Friends, Fiske's ten communication ideas, and more, check out the new Department of Libraries (DOL) Library Friends page at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/friendsofthelibrary. Local libraries aiming to brighten their Friends' websites or Facebook accounts can link to the free Vermont library promotional video at: http://www.vermontlibraries.org/mylibrary/ or to a promotional piece by comedian Paula Poundstone available at the American Library Association "Citizens for Libraries" page: http://www.ala.org/altaff.  

 

DOL Library Consultants Rob Geiszler and Amy Howlett are already planning for the next "Day for Friends," tentatively scheduled for April 2012.

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global Global Virtual Library Conference 2011

The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San José State University has scheduled the Library 2.011 worldwide virtual conference for November 2 - 3, 2011. The conference will be held online, in multiple time zones, over the course of two days, and will be free to attend.

 

The Library 2.011 conference will be a unique chance to participate in a global conversation on the current and future state of libraries. Subject strands will include the changing roles of libraries and librarians, the increasing impact of digital media and the e-book revolution, open educational resources, digital literacy, shifts from information consumption to production (Web 2.0), multimedia and gaming spaces, libraries as community centers, the growth of individualized and self-paced learning, the library as the center of new learning models, understanding users in the digital age, assessing service delivery, and defining leadership and information professional careers in a networked and changing world.

 

The conference website will be hosted at http://www.Library2011.net.

The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San José State University (http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/) is the founding conference sponsor. SLIS offers a nationally ranked Master of Library and Information Science degree, which is fully accredited by the American Library Association. The School's online delivery model allows students to live anywhere while earning their degree. SLIS also offers a fully online Master of Archives and Records Administration degree for students who are interested in pursuing a career in electronic records management. Additionally, the School partners with Queensland University of Technology to offer a doctoral program in Library and Information Science.

SLIS Director Sandra Hirsh is co-chair of the conference. Dr. Hirsh has been a faculty member at several academic institutions, was a librarian in academic and special libraries, and has more than a decade in leadership positions with Silicon Valley's leading global companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, and LinkedIn. She is a recognized advocate for library services, has an extensive record of research in the field, and has been actively involved in leadership roles with professional associations.

Steve Hargadon, the founder of Classroom 2.0 (http://www.classroom20.com) and the Global Education Conference (http://www.globaleducationconference.com), is the founding co-chair of the Library 2.011 conference. Steve hosts the popular FutureofEducation.com interview series, and has consulted on social media and education for PBS, Intel, Ning, Microsoft, KnowledgeWorks Foundation, CoSN, MERLOT, the U.S. State Department, and the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Technology.

For more information, and to sign up for email updates: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/happenings/2011/happenings2011jun17.htm.

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summerLibrary Outreach: Summer 2011

It's summer and a good time for public libraries to expand services beyond the library building. Several libraries offer mobile bookmobile services. Find more about these programs at:   http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/vtbookmobiles11update.pdf.

 

But that's not the only way to reach out to community members. It's easy to do outreach with the most basic equipment. Here are some suggestions for libraries:

  • Hold storytime in conjunction with town partners such as the recreation program or summer camp. All you need is a blanket, some picture books, and (perhaps) some books to give away or check out to attendees. Don't forget to distribute the library's summer schedule on a bookmark, flyer or brochure.
  • Book a performer and hold the program at the biggest housing development, on the town green or at a mobile home park. If you can't afford a performer, consider a local hero/heroine such as a celebrated athlete, a town fireman or the school principal. The library can provide picture books for the "hero" to read with children and parents.
  • Learn about DOL's Early Literacy Initiative and use these methods and materials to reach out to parents and childcare providers with books, support, and information on early brain development and the importance of reading. More information and storytime outlines are at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/eli.
  • Bring books and a short reading (poetry? short story? first chapter?) to the local senior meals site. Consider hosting a book club at the site year round.
  • Join community events like the county fair, Homecoming Days, or the 4th of July parade.  The library booth could feature activities like tie dying, activity sheets, or impromptu stories. A ready supply of handouts with library hours and services is important.
  • Visit family childcare sites, childcare centers, and even local businesses.
  • Offer a speaker's program about your library to local Rotary Club, Lions Club, PTG, or other civic groups; if the library has enough staff, offer to fill in at the last minute when a speaker cancels.
  • Consider service to those who are home-bound, including homebound patrons and their caregivers, nursing home residents, folks living in residential care or assisted living facilities, or seniors in adult day care programs.
  • Take computer training out into the community. Teach beginning computer skills and basic instruction on using email, filling out online form and job applications or using e-government services. Why not have a program on searching online vacation and tourism sites?
  • Meet with adult education and literacy instructors to see how you can work together.
  • Plan ahead for next summer and work with http://www.hungerfreevt.org/ (formerly Vermont Campaign to End Childhood Hunger) to provide snacks or meals with library outreach to youth.

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materialsMaterials Review Sessions:  Fall Dates and Places Set

Once again DOL will sponsor the ever-popular Materials Review Sessions featuring reviews of recently published books for children and young adults. School and public librarians are invited to attend one of four sessions to be held this fall. Because attendance has lessened at the two regular southern locations, DOL will combine these into one program to be held at the Fletcher Memorial Library inLudlow. There will no longer be sessions in either Killington or Kurn Hattin. The session in the Northeast Kingdom, formerly held at the Northeast Regional Library, will now be held at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

 

At the Materials Review Sessions, Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene orally reviews about 75 recently published children's and young adult books and also displays copies of hundreds more titles that have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books, with copies of the reviews taped inside, are available for perusal so librarians can see what they are getting before they place their orders. Greene will do two "live" sessions in (1) Northfield and (2) Ludlow. The other two programs will be presented via a DVD recording. RETN will record the Northfield presentation which will be shown at libraries in Milton and St. Johnsbury. The books, with the reviews inserted in them, will accompany the DVD, so participants at all sites will have access to all the books. The schedule is as follows:

 

Wednesday, October 26                          Brown Public Library, Northfield              LIVE!

Thursday, October 27                             Fletcher Memorial Library, Ludlow          LIVE! 

Wednesday, November 2                         Milton Public Library (in the library's new meeting room)

Thursday, November 3                            St. Johnsbury Athenaeum                       

 

All programs begin at 9:00 a.m. Registration is not required. Following the formal part of the program there will be plenty of time for librarians to examine the books. For those who cannot attend any of the programs, the presentation will be streamed live on the RETN website at: http://www.retn.org/ and the accompanying bibliography will be posted on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/mrs

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 VPTVPT and DOL Partner to Promote Literacy 

The Department of Libraries has a new partnership with Vermont Public Television based on their shared mission to promote literacy.  For the first joint project, Kathryn Scott, VPT Chief Content Officer, and a film crew attended the Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Ceremony at Vermont Technical College on June 1 and interviewed Wendy Mass, the winning author of 11 Birthday, as well as several young readers who came to hear Mass speak. To see the clip, go to: 

http://www.vpt.org/engage/vpt-you/promoting-childrens-literacy.

 

Librarians and teachers will want to use this video to kick off the new school year's reading in September. Another way teachers and librarians can promote the DCF Award program is to encourage young readers to use the DCF blog, maintained and moderated by Kate Davie, Librarian at Blue Mountain Union School. The purpose of the blog is for children to write what they think about a book after they have read it and engage in a dialogue with other readers around the state. The three important posting guidelines are: (1) be respectful, (2) be on-topic, and (3) avoid "spoiler" information. The blog can be found at: http://dcfbooks.edublogs.org/.

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo

What does a children's book author read for fun? We asked several Vermont authors what they are reading this summer and got quite an eclectic mix of responses:   

 

Essays of E.B. White bookjacketAnna Dewdney, author and illustrator of the bestselling picture book Llama, Llama, Red Pajama and sequels writes, "I have been reading and re-reading Essays of E.B. White.  His gentle, loving, humorous take on everything from politics to raccoons simply cheers and soothes me.  I wish so much that I had met him."

 

 

 

 

 ThegirlwhofellfromtheskyBookJacketKaren Hesse, author of many picture books and novels for children,  including the Newbery-winning Out of the Dust reports, "I have just finished reading two books, The Girl Who Fell From the Sky by Heidi Durrow and Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt. The former was recommended by a friend at a shared dinner. It showed up later that week on our doorstep, seemingly 'falling from the sky.' It is painful, eloquent, dream-like, with a fragile tendril of hope rising in the end. The latter, recommended by a librarian friend, was published in 2007 but somehow I missed it the first time around. So glad for second chances. The    WednesdaywarsBookJacket narrator, Holling Hoodhood, made me laugh, made me cry, made me groan, made me sigh. Two books for two very different audiences told by two powerful narrators. Two summer-reading journeys I'm glad to have taken."

 

 

 

 

thegreatman bookjacket David Martin, author of easy readers and picture books, including one coming out in September called Little Bunny and the Magic Christmas Tree, illustrated by Valeri Gorbachev, enjoyed The Great Man by Kate Christensen.  "The great man is an artist who died before the book begins, so you never meet him.  And maybe wouldn't want to.  But you do meet and get involved with his wife, his mistress of many, many years, his children and two authors writing biographies of the great man.  The book's an interesting look into relationships and the art scene, and for me this was a nice visit back to NY."

 

birdology bookjacket Katherine Paterson, two-time Newbery Medal winner and current National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, reported, "I just finished Birdology by Sy Montgomery. Whoever imagined that chickens were so interesting or that a writer could make me care about not only hens, but all kinds of birds from parrots to cassowaries? It's an amazing and delightful book with not only facts about our living dinosaurs but wonderful stories. Now I'm onto Garrett Graff's The Threat Matrix about the FBI's role in combating global terrorism, about as timely a book as you could hope to find, well written and gripping. There are even some funny bits." 

 

bookjacketmagicandmysteryintibet Jan Reynolds, photographer, adventurer and author of several books on indigenous cultures, told us, "I'm rereading one of my favorite books of all time, Magic and Mystery in Tibet, written by Alexandra David-Neel. This intrepid woman, Alexandra, wrote this book to describe her years in Tibet. When the British sent a famous military general, Younghusband, into Tibet to "conquer" the area in 1904, who was already there meditating in a cave, not only speaking specific Tibetan dialects but learning the art of Thumo? Alexandra, of course. She was documented to have the ability to dry numerous wet sheets, while wrapped in them in bookjacketportraitofanadventurer the cold Tibetan winter, by raising her body temperature. This wasn't some fancy trick, but a demonstration she had mastered with the acute focus of a particular form of meditation, Thumo. Alexandra was so ahead of her time. While other British women were wearing corsets, she was sneaking into Tibet solo, with her French husband supporting her financially, although they almost never saw each other, but their letters to each other are beautiful. This is why you also need to read Alexandra David-Neel's A Portrait of an Adventurer  to really see what adventure was like at the turn of the century and how an amazing woman got farther, and learned more, in much better style than any colonizing military male Brit.  Alexandra was the original feminist, although she was really just being Alexandra with no agenda."

 

bookjacketchime Tanya Lee Stone, author of nonfiction for children including the Sibert-winning Almost Astronauts, writes, "I am currently reading Chime, by Franny Billingsley. There are artists with voices so distinctly their own you know it before seeing the name attached to the work--musicians, painters, composers, writers. 'Wolfgirl, who was leaf dance and moon claw and tooth gleam. When Jupiter sizzled the air with lightning bolts, she caught them on the fly.' That is Franny Billingsley, unmistakably. I freely admit that fantasy is not my first choice when I reach for a book, but I will always read whatever Billingsley writes. She captivated me with Well Wished and again with The Folk Keeper. I have been an ardent fan ever since."

 

carteblanchebookjacket Steve Swinburne, author of many nature books and recently the chapter book Wiff and Dirty George, based on his early years growing up in London says, "I am reading two books this summer: one on my iPad and one in paperback. On my iPad I downloaded the new James Bond novel called Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver. This is the second Bond novel sanctioned by the Ian Fleming Estate. I am half-way through the novel and it's a page turner! Deaver put Bond in the present day, so he's a 2011 James Bond, complete with his iPhone and laptop. But all the anhillbookjacket traditional Bond stuff is here: gadgets, fast cars, beautiful women, exotic destinations. I can't wait to finish it.  I am also reading E.O. Wilson's Anthill. Wilson is the preeminent scientist and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for nonfiction and author of Sociobiology (1975) and On Human Nature (1978). This is the story of a young boy from Alabama named Raff, a born naturalist, who loves hanging out along the shores of nearby Lake Nokobee. Raff grows up studying biology in college, but when he learns that his beloved boyhood wilderness will be bought and developed, he enters law school with the goal of saving the woods he loved as a child. The middle of the book is devoted to a fascinating account of ant colonies along the shores of Lake Nokobee. No one writes better than Wilson about the rise and fall of ant colonies. Read it for a glimpse into an epic underground ant struggle."

 

mudvillebookjacket Doug Wilhelm, author of several Young Adult (YA) novels and a recent nonfiction book on Alexander the Great, says, " I think the reason why there's not a lot of good magical realism, in YA fiction, is that it's so hard to do: to set a story in the real world, give it magic, and make it all work. But I'm deep into Mudville, Kurtis Scaletta's 2009 novel about a town somewhere in the Great Plains where a mysterious curse ended baseball and began a rain that lasted 22 years - in this fine story which centers on one young ballplayer with a father and another without. The characters, events and dialogue ring true, there is magic ... and it works."


FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera
The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that is available for Vermont public libraries to borrow. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using Flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has posted a loan policy on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/flipcameraloan

For more information about borrowing the Flip camera, call 802.828.3261 

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imls