imagesof kids, adults and seniors using technology
In This Issue
From the State Librarian
Trustees Up to Speed
Digital Newspaper Advisory Committee
Grants for School Libraries
Multimedia Advertising Campaign for Vermont Libraries
Talking Book Day Marks 80 Years of Service
Quechee Public Library Going Solar
Small is Beautiful
Discovering Community
Why Become a Law Librarian?
New Cartoonist Laureate
Derby Library Launches Capital Campaign
$1.4 Million for Aldrich Public Library
Libraries Traveling Exhibit
The Red Clover Award List
We Want Names!
Check it out !
Continuing Education Program 2011

Learn more

New in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library

Learn more

Borrow a Flip
Video Camera
 Find out more
Helpful Links
Department of Libraries
VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
VT Humanities Council
VCAL
GMLC

VT Folklife Center

Join Our Mailing List

backtotopFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

I've been reading the new OCLC study Perceptions of Libraries, 2010: Context and Community and find the data compelling. OCLC, the world's largest library cooperative, has issued a number of research reports over the years, and this latest study on the public perceptions of libraries follows a similar study published in 2005. A lot has happened in those 5 years and the report clearly shows that the effects of the "Great Recession" and the spread of technology and social media have changed how the general public and college students view and use libraries. Just think about these changes over the past 5 years as reported in the study:

  • 239 million Americans are now online (12% increase)
  • E-books sales grew by 1,544%
  • 100% growth in the number of Americans that use mobile access to the Internet
  • 1,300% growth in the use of Facebook (152,000,000 U.S. unique visitors each month)
  • Google searches up 84% (reaching a 66% share of search engine use)
  •  93% of all Americans own a cell phone, with a 1,050% increase in smartphone ownership   

 Read more  

Getting New Library Trustees Up to Speed

Attention public library directors and trustees! Have a new trustee on your board? It's important to provide them with an orientation that includes an introduction to the tools and resources they will need to operate effectively. Every trustee needs to read the Manual for Vermont Library Trustees.The most current version of the Manual (with upates as needed) is located at:

http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/5th_edition_UPDATED_9_16_10.pdf

and includes ideas for trustee orientation (e.g. give each trustee a notebook with library policies, rosters of board members and library staff, and the library long range plan.) Before the first board meeting, each new trustee should meet with the director and the board chair to talk informally about library service, board meetings and committees. Read more

Digital Newspaper Advisory Committee Announced

The Vermont Digital Newspaper Project is pleased to announce a newly formed Advisory Committee whose task it is to select specific historical Vermont newspapers for digitization. Committee members are:  Jan Albers (Head, Sheldon Museum, Middlebury), Jerry Carbone (Director, Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro), Paul Carnahan (Librarian, Vermont History Center Library, Barre), Jim Davidson (Curator, Rutland Historical Society), Prudence Doherty (Public Services Librarian, Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library, University of Vermont), Elise Guyette (President, Chittenden County Historical Society), Shara McCaffrey (Assistant Director, St. Johnsbury Athenaeum), Rob Mitchell (Special Projects Manager, Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus),read more.

Grants for School Libraries

In 2008 Anne Knickerbocker, a former Texas school media specialist, created the Snapdragon Book Foundation which provides grants for the purchase of books for school libraries that serve disadvantaged youth.  According to their website, the Foundation "exists to put books in the hands of kids. In a time when many schools are reallocating their funds to technology and audiovisual equipment, we hope to make sure that school libraries are still offering children good books to read." For more information, see: http://www.snapdragonbookfoundation.org/

Multimedia Advertising Campaign for  

Vermont Libraries 

Attention, librarians! The Vermont Library Association, the Vermont School Library Association and the Vermont Department of Libraries have joined forces to create a multi-media advertising campaign for Vermont libraries. The campaign includes television commercials and newspaper ads to be released during National Library Week (April 10-16) and state-wide Library Snapshot Day (March and April). To make the Vermont Library Snapshot Day a success we encourage librarians across the state to participate -- from ALL types of libraries. Library Snapshot Day is a great way for libraries to show Vermont citizens, library patrons, policymakers and funders exactly what happens at your library during a single day. Read more

Talking Book Day Marks 80 Years of Service  

Imagine being unable to read the recent books that everyone is talking about, or old classics that have become part of our popular culture. For those unable to read because of poor vision, that scenario is not necessary, thanks to "talking books" provided by the National Library Service (NLS) for the Blind & Physically Handicapped.  March 3, 2011, marks the 80th anniversary of the Pratt-Smoot Act which authorized the Library of Congress to create NSL, and is being celebrated across the nation as Talking Book Day. From long-playing record to digital download, the NLS has provided thousands of popular titles to readers of all ages.  Thanks to "talking books," many Vermont authors, including Katherine Paterson and Archer Mayor, are now enjoyed by those who are unable to read regular print due to visual impairment or physical condition.  For more information on talking books and other services from the NLS, please contact the Vermont Department of Libraries, Special Services Unit, at lib.ssu@state.vt.us  or call toll-free in Vermont 1-800-479-1711. Special Services staff can also put you in contact with network libraries in other states, in case you are interested in setting up service for someone who lives elsewhere.

solar panels

Quechee Public Library Going Solar

The Quechee Public Library has received a $30,000 grant for solar panels from The SunUp Foundation. The grant money will allow the Library to put 12- 24 panels on their roof and they expect that the company groSolar will install the panels during 2011. The solar panels will save on the library's electric bills and also provide good opportunity for alternative energy programs at the library. Stay tuned: Quechee will include on their website a widget that will allow viewers to track how much energy is being saved.

Vermont's Rural Libraries: Small is Beautifulpicture of Vermont building on the fall

Are you a librarian, trustee or staff member of a Vermont public library? Do you feel confident that you and the others in your library understand how your library operates and what to do in emergencies or difficult situations? Do you have all recommended policies and procedures written down, current and easily available? Do you know who wears what "hat"? Library Consulants at the Department of Libraries are frequently asked to help public library staff and trustees with these and other issues and they are an excellent resource for solo librarians, trustees in multi-person libraries and directors of larger libraries.  Read more.

"Discovering Community" Summer Institute

Registration for the 2011 Discovering Community Summer Institute will be available soon!  This Institute, a project of the Vermont Folklife Center, will take place June 27 - July 1, 2011 in Middlebury, Vermont.  Discovering Community - Students, Digital Media and Place-Based Learning offers participants hands-on experience learning the methods of community-based research, the process of making a documentary, and models for working with digital media in a classroom environment. To learn more about this program and to see a list of Institute faculty, visit: http://www.discoveringcommunity.org/   For more information, call (802) 388-4964.

Why Become a Law Librarian? 

pauldonovaninthestacksIf you have ever been to the Vermont State Library in Montpelier during the past 30 years, you must have met the State Law Librarian. Library visitors will find him surrounded by books, in the stacks or at the reference desk ready to answer questions, especially those that are law related. Paul J. Donovan, our well kept public secret,  was recently featured in the February 2011 issue of AALL Spectrum magazine. The Journal asked law librarians, "Why did you become a law librarian?" Read Paul's response at: http://www.aallnet.org/products/pub_sp1102/pub-sp1102-Member.pdf 

Vermont Announces New Cartoonist Laureate

James Kochalka is Vermont's first Cartoonist Laureate. The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction made the selection, choosing from many talented Vermont artists. James Kochalka was born in Springfield, Vermont, attended the University of Vermont and is now a resident of Burlington. American Elf is Kochalka's daily cartoon diary, one cartoon strip for every day of his life. Readers will enjoy the references to Vermont as well as the evocation of one person's singular point of view.Kochalka is also the creator of a number of children's books including the "Johnny Boo" series and Squirrely Gray. For a look at Kochalka's work, visit http://americanelf.com

 

Events to honor the new Cartoonist Laureate are planned in Burlington, Montpelier, Springfield, and White River Junction on March 10. For event details, consult: cartoonstudies.org

Vermont is the second U.S. state to name a Cartoonist Laureate, following Alaska which honored Chad Carpenter in 2008.

 Derby Library Launches Capital Campaign
The Board of the Dailey Memorial Library in Derby Center is launching a major capital campaign to raise $500,000 for a library addition.  The goal of the campaign is to raise enough money to double the size of the current library by adding a community meeting room and a large children's room. Other plans include adding a lift, making the library handicapped accessible throughout, and redesigning space to create a "technology room" for public computing. The Dailey Memorial Library was built in 1957 with funds donated by Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Dailey.  For more information about the library, check out their website: http://daileymemoriallibrary.org/

Aldrich Public Library Receives $1.4 Million  

When Ronald York, a Barre businessman, died in a helicopter crash in 2009, he left behind a wonderful legacy that will impact the Barre community for generations to come. As part of his estate York left $7 million to five local community organizations, including the Aldrich Library ($1.4 million), Vermont Historical Society, Barre Youth Sports Association, Barre Senior Center, and the newly-created Ronald J. York Scholarship Foundation. Congratulations to Library Director Karen Lane and the staff and trustees at Aldrich Public Library. This bequest is a testament to the outstanding service that Aldrich Library provides to the citizens of Barre and surrounding towns.

Libraries Traveling Exhibit: Apply Today 

The ALA Public Programs Office, the Folger Shakespeare Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invite public, academic and special libraries to apply to host "Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," a traveling exhibition to America's libraries. Three copies of the exhibit will travel to 40 libraries from fall of 2011 through winter of 2013. For more information, including access to the online application, visit www.ala.org/kingjamesbible.

 

The year 2011 marks the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible. "Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible" tells the story of the origins, creation, and impact of the book, including its influence on English and American literature and its multifaceted impact on culture and society to the present day. Read more

The Red Clover Award List for 2011-2012

It's official! The Red Clover Committee has announced the book nominees for the 2011-2012 school year. The Red Clover Award, co-sponsored by Mother Goose Programs (Vermont Center for the Book), Windham County Reads and the Vermont Departments of Education and Libraries, promotes the reading and discussion of the best of contemporary picture books in nearly all of Vermont's elementary schools. Each year over 20,000 K-4 students read, or have read to them, the ten nominated books.

Here are the nominees: Read more

 We Want Names!

 As one of our DOL Newsletter subscribers, you know The Newsletter is the best way to find out what's happening at the Vermont Department of Libraries.  This is where you will learn about grant offerings, continuing education opportunities and other news you need to know.  If you know someone  -a staff member, trustee, local elected official-  who would benefit from receiving this newsletter, please send their email address to renee.ancel@state.vt.us.  If it's happening at the Department of Libraries, you'll learn about it here!

        checkitout

What are Vermonters reading this winter? Since the Vermont Legislature is now in session, we asked some House Committee Chairs to tell us what they are reading and why they recommend these books for other readers. Here is what they had to say:

 

lotuseaterbookjacket Martha Heath (Westford), Chair of the House Committee on Appropriations, is currently reading The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli.  She highly recommends this first novel about a photojournalist covering the war in Vietnam.  In her comments about the book, Representative Heath said: "The story is mesmerizing and beautifully written.  It would be difficult not to be deeply touched and enriched by reading this book."  She also told us she borrowed the book from her hometown library, the Westford Public Library.

Read more 


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

I've been reading the new OCLC study Perceptions of Libraries, 2010: Context and Community and find the data compelling. OCLC, the world's largest library cooperative, has issued a number of research reports over the years, and this latest study on the public perceptionsof libraries follows a similar study published in 2005. A lot has happened in those 5 years and the report clearly shows that the effects of the "Great Recession" and the spread of technology and social media have changed how the general public and college students view and use libraries. Just think about these changes over the past 5 years as reported in the study:

  • 239 million Americans are now online (12% increase)
  • E-books sales grew by 1,544%
  • 100% growth in the number of Americans that use mobile access to the Internet
  • 1,300% growth in the use of Facebook (152,000,000 U.S. unique visitors each month)
  • Google searches up 84% (reaching a 66% share of search engine use)
  •  93% of all Americans own a cell phone, with a 1,050% increase in smartphone ownership    

These figures are astonishing. Libraries are responding to these societal changes by introducing mobile access to library resources, adding e-content to their collections, and incorporating social media into their communications and PR plans. And what do Americans think about libraries? According to OCLC, "Libraries as a source of books remain both top-of-mind and top-of-personal value for Americans." This is true across all age groups except for teens ages 14-17. For that group "a place to read" is most valued in libraries. For those Americans who have been "economically impacted" by the recession, the library has filled the gap - providing free access to books, CDs and DVDs, technology and the assistance of trained library staff.  Indeed librarians add significant value to the library experience for millions of Americans. "Americans see and appreciate the value of librarians. The vast majority (83%) of Americans who have used a librarian agree that librarians add value to the search process, even more so than in 2005 (76%)."

 

There is plenty more to read in this report and I encourage you to take a close look. This report will be of interest to librarians, library staff, library trustees, and citizens. I encourage you to use this report as you go about your current and long-range planning, when you talk to funders and policy-makers, and as you evaluate library services. How can your library respond to the information in this report? Will knowing these powerful public perceptions change the way your library delivers services, or how you allocate funding?  Here at the Department of Libraries we will be taking a close look at this data to evaluate our own library sevices and to examine the services we offer to Vermont libraries. This OCLC report can be the catalyst for discussion among librarians in Vermont and I invite you to share your thoughts with me: martha.reid@state.vt.us You can read (and order) the full OCLC report at: www.oclc.org/reports/ 

 

 

Martha Reid


TrusteesGetting New Library Trustees Up to Speed

 Attention public library directors and trustees! Have a new trustee on your board? It's important to provide them with an orientation that includes an introduction to the tools and resources they will need to operate effectively. Every trustee needs to read the Manual for Vermont Library Trustees.The most current version of the Manual (with upates as needed) is located at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/5th_edition_UPDATED_9_16_10.pdf and includes ideas for trustee orientation (e.g. give each trustee a notebook with library policies, rosters of board members and library staff, and the library long range plan.) Before the first board meeting, each new trustee should meet with the director and the board chair to talk informally about library service, board meetings and committees. This is a great time to discuss some basics about libraries, including intellectual freedom. At the first meeting, new trustees should feel welcomed; let them introduce themselves and ask questions.

The Vermont Department of Libraries offers trustee training at the annual Town Officer Education Conferences (TOEC) scheduled this year in April, part of the UVM Extension Service. Online registration information will be available March 4, 2011 at http://www.uvm.edu/extension. Note: TOEC sessions specifically for library trustees will only be offered during the day.

The 2011 Town Officer Education Conferences are scheduled for:

Wednesday, April 6

Hilton, Burlington

Thursday, April 7      

Johnson State College, Johnson

Wednesday, April 20

Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee

Wednesday, April 27    

Holiday Inn, Rutland

The Department of Libraries has posted links to a variety of sites of interest to library trustees at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees For more information on trustee issues, library directors and trustees are encouraged to contact their DOL Library Consultant.

Back to top 


DigitalVermont Digital Newspaper Advisory Committee

The Vermont Digital Newspaper Project is pleased to announce a newly formed Advisory Committee whose task it is to select specific historical Vermont newspapers for digitization. Committee members are:  Jan Albers (Head, Sheldon Museum, Middlebury), Jerry Carbone (Director, Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro), Paul Carnahan (Librarian, Vermont History Center Library, Barre), Jim Davidson (Curator, Rutland Historical Society), Prudence Doherty (Public Services Librarian, Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library, University of Vermont), Elise Guyette (President, Chittenden County Historical Society), Shara McCaffrey (Assistant Director, St. Johnsbury Athenaeum), Rob Mitchell (Special Projects Manager, Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus), Nick Monsarrat (Vermont journalist and journalism historian, based in Charlotte), Tyler Resch (Librarian, Bennington Museum), Gregory Sanford (Vermont State Archivist, Vermont State Archives), and Ray Zirblis (Adjunct Professor, Norwich University).   

 

The Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, under the leadership of the UVM Bailey Howe Library, and in partnership with the Department of Libraries and other groups, is funded with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and led by Project Librarian Tom McMurdo. Selection criteria for newspapers for this project include: technical quality of the microfilm to be digitized, intellectual content, research value, cultural diversity and regional diversity. Additionally, newspaper selections must have been printed within the 1836 to 1922 time frame required by the NEH grant. Vermont newspapers that have already been digitized by commercial or other means are not likely candidates for inclusion in the digitization project.

Back to top

SnapshotMultimedia Advertising Campaign for Vermont Libraries

Attention, librarians! The Vermont Library Association, the Vermont School Library Association and the Vermont Department of Libraries have joined forces to create a multi-media advertising campaign for Vermont libraries. The campaign includes television commercials and newspaper ads to be released during National Library Week (April 10-16) and state-wide Library Snapshot Day (March and April).

To make the Vermont Library Snapshot Day a success we encourage librarians across the state to participate -- from ALL types of libraries. Library Snapshot Day is a great way for libraries to show Vermont citizens, library patrons, policymakers and funders exactly what happens at your library during a single day. 

How many reference questions were answered? How many people walked through the library doors? What sort of programs did folks attend? How many students toured the library? Library Snapshot Day allows libraries to show the impact of their services through photographs as well as statistics.

Below is a link to the wiki that has everything libraries need to participate, including how-to's, forms, etc. Libraries are asked to choose a date between now and early April and submit/upload photos and statistics to share with others. The Snapshot Day committee will see to it that things are organized/aggregated in a meaningful way just in time for National Library Week (April 10-16).  

Details at: http://vermontlibrarysnapshotday.pbworks.com

To read more about Library Snapshot Day, and to see what has taken place in other states, check out the American Library Association website at: http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/advocacy/statelocalefforts/snapshotday/index.cfm

Back to top 


smallVermont's Rural Libraries: Small is Beautiful

Are you a librarian, trustee or staff member of a Vermont public library? Do you feel confident that you and the others in your library understand how your library operates and what to do in emergencies or difficult situations? Do you have all recommended policies and procedures written down, current and easily available? Do you know who wears what "hat"?

Library Consulants at the Department of Libraries are frequently asked to help public library staff and trustees with these and other issues and they are an excellent resource for solo librarians, trustees in multi-person libraries and directors of larger libraries.  We know that library directors comb library literature for helpful books and articles, and we are happy to suggest an article that appeared in the January 2011 issue of American Libraries. "When Small Is All" by Jane Perlmutter and Paul Nelson gives some great guidelines and checklists for those who work in small libraries, the 88% of all U.S. public libraries with service area populations of less than 50,000 people. (Well, that sure describes Vermont libraries!)

Check out the article at: http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/12072010/when-small-all


TravelingLibrary Traveling Exhibit

The ALA Public Programs Office, the Folger Shakespeare Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invite public, academic and special libraries to apply to host "Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," a traveling exhibition to America's libraries. Three copies of the exhibit will travel to 40 libraries from fall of 2011 through winter of 2013. For more information, including access to the online application, visit www.ala.org/kingjamesbible.

The year 2011 marks the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible. "Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible" tells the story of the origins, creation, and impact of the book, including its influence on English and American literature and its multifaceted impact on culture and society to the present day. The fascinating history and influence of the King James Bible will interest many viewers of the traveling exhibit, resulting in a new understanding of the book's social, cultural, literary and religious influence over four centuries.

Libraries applying to host "Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," must register their institution at Grants.gov. Prospective applicants are advised to register with Grants.gov as soon as possible, since the process can take up to two weeks to complete. Online applications must be completed by April 5.

Successful applicants will host the exhibit for a four-week period between fall of 2011 and winter of 2013 and will receive a $2,500 grant from NEH for attendance at an exhibit-planning workshop and other exhibit-related expenses. Participating libraries are expected to present at least two free public programs featuring a lecture or discussion by a qualified scholar on exhibition themes.  All showings of the exhibition must be free and open to the public. The exhibition, consisting of 14 graphic panels printed onto seven double-sided banners, requires approximately 600 square feet of display space.

"Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., and the ALA Public Programs Office.  It is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the Folger Shakespeare Library and The Bodleian Library, Oxford University, to mark the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible.  The traveling exhibition was made possible by a major grant from NEH.  


From: ALA Public Programs Office, www.ala.org/publicprograms

Back to top 


RedThe Red Clover Award List for 2011-2012

It's official! The Red Clover Committee has announced the book nominees for the 2011-2012 school year. The Red Clover Award, co-sponsored by Mother Goose Programs (Vermont Center for the Book), Windham County Reads and the Vermont Departments of Education and Libraries, promotes the reading and discussion of the best of contemporary picture books in nearly all of Vermont's elementary schools. Each year over 20,000 K-4 students read, or have read to them, the ten nominated books.

Here are the nominees:   

Black, Michael Ian.  A Pig Parade is a Terrible Idea.  Illustrated by Kevin Hawkes.  S & S, 2010. 

Croza, Laurel.  I Know Here.  Illustrated by Matt James.  Groundwood, 2010. 

DiCamillo, Kate & Alison McGhee.  Bink & Gollie.  Illustrated by Tony Fucile.   

Candlewick, 2010.  Gilani-Williams, Fawzia.  Nabeel's New Pants.  Illustrated by Proiti Roy.  Marshall Cavendish, 2010. 

Klise, Kate.  Stand Straight, Ella Kate: The True Story of a Real Giant.  Illustrated by M. Sarah Klise.  Dial, 2010. 

Knapp, Ruthie.  Who Stole the Mona Lisa?  Illustrated by Jill McElmurry.  Bloomsbury, 2010. 

McCully, Emily Arnold.  Wonder Horse: The True Story of the World's Smartest Horse.  Holt, 2010. 

Singer, Marilyn.  Mirror, Mirror: A Book of Reversible Verse.  Illustrated by Josée Masse.  Dutton, 2010. 

Solheim, James.  Born Yesterday.  Illustrated by Simon James.  Philomel, 2010. 

Wiesner, David.  Art & Max.  Clarion, 2010. 

Back to top 


 CEP2011Continuing Education Program 2011

The Department of Libraries' 2011 Continuing Education Website and 2011 Calendar are up and running. Each year DOL offers two 5-day core workshops  required for certification. This year the core courses are "Basic Public Library Administration" and "Basic Reference."

 

DOL is also offering technology workshops, including sessions on interlibrary loan, "First Aid for Computers," and a class on technology trends taught by enthusiastic guest-presenter Linda Braun. Other highlights for 2011 include workshops on genealogy, grant writing, forming community partnerships, and advocacy. Library services for youth will be supported with "One World, Many Stories" (Summer Reading Program), Materials Review, and more. Use the links above to find out more about workshop offerings, check dates and locations, and register to attend.

Back to top 


 checkitout     checkitoutlogo 

What are Vermonters reading this winter? Since the Vermont Legislature is now in session, we asked some House Committee Chairs to tell us what they are reading and why they recommend these books for other readers. Here is what they had to say:

 

lotuseaterbookjacket Martha Heath (Westford), Chair of the House Committee on Appropriations, is currently reading The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli.  She highly recommends this first novel about a photojournalist covering the war in Vietnam.  In her comments about the book, Representative Heath said: "The story is mesmerizing and beautifully written.  It would be difficult not to be deeply touched and enriched by reading this book."  Also, she told us she borrowed the book at her hometown library, the Westford Public Library.

  

 

 

A Distant Mirror bookjacketBill Botzow (Pownal), Chair of the House Committee on Commerce and Economic Development, is slowly reading this winter A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous Fourteenth Century by Barbara Tuchman. In his e-mail to DOL, Representative Botzow wrote: "In this difficult budget year where we are addressing health care, taxes and job creation, this well-written history gives a sobering perspective on a truly difficult time of plague and endless war, as well as constantly conflicting and shifting political alliances that was almost always just awful for the common man."  

   

 

Room bookjacketJanet Ancel (Calais), Chair of the House Committee on Ways and Means, says she is mostly reading tax legislation these days, but recently finished Room by Emma Donoghue. The book is about a five- year-old boy and his mother who are held in an 11'x11' space for seven long years. Representative Ancel commented: "I only recommend books with characters I care about.  Room is one of those books.  The voice of Jack, the five-year-old boy, is authentic and captivating and the author succeeds in creating a bond between the boy and the reader -- something especially difficult when the author is speaking through the boy."

 

autobiographyMarkTwainBookjacketDavid L. Deen (Westminster), Chair of the House Committee on Fish, Wildlife and Natural Resources, stated: "I have three books going right now - The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly - a potboiler of crime and representation before our courts; Fur, Fortune and Empire by Eric Donlin - a historical book about the fur trade in America, and the Autobiography of Mark Twain. They all serve different reading likings on my part: escapism, historical reading, and Mark Twain, who is my favorite character in the American history of letters."

 

bookjacketThePillars ofthe EarthDonna Sweaney, (Windsor) Chair of the House Committee on Government Operations, reported: "I am currently reading The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. It was recommended to me by my husband and a number of friends who said it was one of the best books they had read. It is a period novel that I find very interesting. It centers on the building of a cathedral in 12th century England. The characters are fascinating and it is well written."

Representative Sweaney: We recommend that you also read the sequel: World Without End.


Back to top


ScienceNew in the Library Science Collection

ALA Guide to Sociology & Psychology Reference. American Library Association, 2011.

Fullner, Sheryl Kindle. The Shoestring Library. Linworth, 2010.

In the Words of the Winners: the Newbery and Caldecott Medals, 2001-2010. American Library Association, 2011.

Landau, Herbert B. Winning Library Grants: a Game Plan. American Library Association, 2011.

Manguel, Alberto. The Library at Night. Yale University Press, 2009.

Marek, Kate. Organizational Storytelling for Librarians: Using Stories for Effective Leadership. American Library Association, 2011.

Metz, Ruth F. Coaching in the Library: a Management Strategy for Achieving Excellence. American Library Association, 2011.

Privacy and Freedom of Information in 21st-Century Libraries. ALA TechSource, 2010.

Rubin, Rhea Joyce. Defusing the Angry Patron: a How-to-do-it Manual for Librarians. Neal-Schuman Publishers Inc., 2011.

Solomon, Laura. Doing Social Media So it Matters: a Librarian's Guide. American Library Association, 2011.

Toor, Ruth. Being Indispensable: a School Librarian's Guide to Becoming an Invaluable Leader. American Library Association, 2011.

Tucker, Virginia. Finding the Answers to Legal Questions: a How-to-do-it Manual. Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2011.

Webber, Carlisle K. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Teen Literature: A Guide to Reading Interests. Libraries Unlimited, 2010.

Back to top 


FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera
The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that is available for Vermont public libraries to borrow. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using Flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has posted a loan policy on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/flipcameraloan

For more information about borrowing the Flip, contact Renee Ancel at 802.828.3266 /

renee.ancel@state.vt.us 

Back to top 



imls