letterheadpeople
In This Issue
From the State Librarian
e-VT Community Broadband Project Update
Project MERGE
The Vermont Library Lists
New Member of the Vermont Board of Libraries
VLA News is Back!
Local Goverment Day - February 16
Haskell Library Receives $5,000 Donation
U-32 School Library "Exemplary " Designation
Bristol Library Celebrates Centennial
Brownell Library Awarded "Louisa May Alcott"
New Director for IMLS
"Compare Public Libraries" an online tool
OCLC New Report: Perceptions of Libraries, 2010
Report on Internet Use
The Libri Foundation Offers 2011 Grants
Materials Review Sessions: Schedule and Upcoming Survey for Librarians
Amelia Bloomer Project
New Booklist: A New Baby in the Family
DCF Conference
Summer 2011 Reading Program
PBS KIDS GO! Writing Contest
Check it out !
New in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library

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Borrow a Flip
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Department of Libraries
VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
VT Humanities Council
VCAL
GMLC

VT Folklife Center

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backtotopFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

The beginning of a new year always brings an air of change and new promise. This year I didn't make any of my usual resolutions (more exercise, better diet, finally reading War and Peace) because I know those by heart. But I am enjoying the new energy that comes with a change in government leadership and have been paying special attention to what Governor Shumlin has been saying in his first days in office. I am delighted to report that I have been re-appointed as Vermont's State Librarian and look forward to working with the new Administration on issues of interest to libraries, including life-long learning, workforce development, early literacy, economic development and broadband.

If you did not hear or read Governor Shumlin's Inaugural and Budget addresses, I encourage you to do so at:http://governor.vermont.gov/  

Much of what he is talking about has a direct connection to libraries. Life-long learning? Libraries know all about that - from summer reading programs for children to instruction in our college and school libraries to book discussions and other programming for adult citizens. Pre-school education? In 2010 the Department of Libraries and the Vermont Public Library Foundation, in partnership with the Vermont Center for the Book, launched the Early Literacy Initiative which is changing the way librarians present storytime programs for young children and their parents. Read more.  

e-Vermont Community Broadband Project Update

The Department of Libraries is a partner in the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project, funded with a federal stimulus Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) grant. In 2010 twelve Vermont communities (including all of Grand Isle County) were selected as e-Vermont Communities. Under the direction of the Vermont Council on Rural Development, DOL is working with a variety of partners and with local schools, libraries, businesses and community organizations to develop web-based services and resources, provide computer training for local residents and to stimulate use of local Internet service. The grant includes $96,000 for the purchase of computers and other equipment for public libraries in these e-VT towns. DOL is currently finalizing orders for new computers, laptops, iPads, printers and scanners, and other equipment for the Year One project libraries. Read more.

Project MERGE and the Vermont State Library

If you act quickly, you can hear an unusual sound on the fourth floor of the Vermont State Library - an echo!  The volumes which once lined the shelves (and deadened any noise) have been removed to make room for books being moved up from the first floor of the library.  The volumes from the first floor are being moved to make room for those arriving from the Midstate Library Service Center whose volumes are being moved, in turn, to make room for books from the Northeast Regional Library.  Such is the cascade effect of Project MERGE.

The content of the books which once graced the fourth floor stacks is still available (on site) in reprints and online, and those alternate sources rendered those books superfluous years ago and made them easy choices for disposal last month.  But it was a lot of books - enough to create a space big enough for an echo.  Read more.

Library Grants from the Vermont Arts Council

The recipients of the 2011 Vermont Arts Council Cultural Facilities Grants were honored at the State House on January 13. Among the thirteen honorees were four Vermont libraries: the Cutler Memorial Library in Plainfield,the Wardsboro Library, the Wilder Club and Library (Hartford/Queechee) and the Morristown Centennial Library (Morrisville). Representatives from the libraries joined legislators and the Arts Council staff to explain their projects and talk about the needs that led them to apply for the grants. The Cultural Facilities Grant program helps libraries and other municipal or non-profit entities in Vermont with assistance  to "enhance, create or expand the capacity of an existing building to provide cultural activities for the public."The program is administered in conjunction with the Vermont Historical Society and the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation.  For more information about the 2011 grant recipients, go to: http://www.vermontartscouncil.org/Grants/CulturalFacilities/CFG2011/tabid/223/Default.aspx

The Vermont Library Lists

The Vermont Department of Libraries has created a listserv page at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/listserv  To add a listserv to the list or for comments, contact Amy Howlett, amy.howlett@state.vt.us. The web offers other compilations of library lists, notably at http://www.webjunction.org/listservs  and at http://www.librarysupportstaff.com/4subscribe.html.
Some librarians use listservs to answer one question, subscribing to post the question, waiting for the answer, and then leaving the list. Three well-known lists for public librarians:  PUBLIB http://lists.webjunction.org/publib/ includes public library issues like buildings, personnel, security, policies.  Useful archive search as well.  PUBYAC http://www.pubyac.org/  covers "practical aspects" for library staff working with children and young adults. Useful for programming, recommended reading, general issue discussion. Fiction_L http://www.webrary.org/rs/flmenu.html  Reader's Advisory. Particularly useful for studying genre fiction, booktalks, and collection development issues. Morton Grove Public Library in Illinois maintains the site.

New Member of the Vermont Board of Libraries

Josh Fitzhugh and Bruce Post

Josh Fitzhugh (left) and Bruce Post

Bruce Post of Essex Junction is the newest member of the Vermont Board of Libraries. Appointed by Govenor Douglas before he left office, Post, a current member of the Essex Selectboard, has a background in education and government and attended his first Board meeting this month. The next Board of Libraries meeting is scheduled for April 19 at 10:00 a.m. at  the Midstate Library Service Center in Berlin. Board meetings are open to the public. To see a photo of other Board members and to find Board meeting agendas and minutes, go to: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/bol

 Vermont Library Association: VLA News Is Back!

Attention VLA members: the VLA News has returned in 2011 in a new email format. To receive the VLA News in your inbox, simply fill out the short form on the VLA website: Opt-in to VLA News,http://www.vermontlibraries.org/vla-news

VLA members may also sign up by checking yes to "receiving the VLA newsletter via email" on the 2011 VLA Membership Form, available at:
http://www.vermontlibraries.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/2011VLAmembershipForm.pdf
The January issue of the VLA News is currently available and librarians, trustees and library supporters are encouraged to join VLA to receive this member-only benefit!

Local Government Day - February 16

Local Government Day in the Legislature, co-sponsored by the Vermont League of Cities and Towns and the Vermont Municipal Clerks & Treasurers Association,will take place on Wednesday, February 16, 2011, starting at 9:00 a.m. at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Montpelier.  Registration begins at 8:15 a.m. that day. Directors of libraries in VLCT member towns may want to join their municipal government colleagues for the day. If so, we invite librarians and others to visit the Department of Libraries during the day. Let us know that you are coming by contacting Renee Ancel at 828-3266/ renee.ancel@state.vt.us

Read more. 

Haskell Library Receives $5,000 Donation

Congratulations to Library Director Nancy Rumery and the staff and trustees of the Haskell Library in Derby Line!  In December the Library received a gift of $5,000 from local resident, Roland "Buzzy" Roy. Roy, a member of the Library Board of Trustees and the Derby Line Village Trustees, made the donation to help the library during economic hard times.  Rumery called the donation from Roy "exceptionally generous" and will use the money for general library operation. (News item from  the December 23, 2010 Newport Daily Express.)
 U-32 School Library "Exemplary" Designation

Nancy Everhart, President of the American Association of School Libraries (AASL) will visit Vermont in May as part of her national Vision Tour. The Vision Tour takes AASL's Learning4Life initiative "on-the-road" by showcasing exemplary school libraries across the nation, including the U-32 school library in Vermont. During the tour, Everhart plans to visit a school library in every state in the U.S. with the goal of bringing to the general public visual models of what good school libraries offer students and communities. Read more.

Bristol Library Celebrates Centennial

Lawrence Memorial Library in Bristol has begun a year-long bithday celebration.  Back in 1911 William Lawrence gave a building for a library to the town of Bristol for $1.00 and dedicated the library to his two deceased wives Minnie Peet Lawrence and Lockie Partch Lawrence.  For the past 100 years the Lawrence Memorial Library has provided library service to local citizens and, though it has seen its share of renovations, the building has much of its original character.  This year the library is celebrating with the yearlong theme: "A Century of Stories."  The celebration began on January 11 with a 100th birthday party - a day of entertainment, readings, storytimes and food. Other events scheduled this year include a potluck and cooking demo (February) and the relase of a library centennial cookbook and gala dinner/dance (June). For more information, check the Lawrence Memorial Library website at:  http://www.lawrencelibrary.net/

Brownell Library Awarded "Louisa May Alcott"

Congratulations to the Brownell Library in Essex Junction! The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced that Brownell Library is one of 30 libraries that will receive $2,500 grants to support five reading, viewing and discussion programs featuring the documentary "Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women" and the companion biography of the same name. Read more.

New Director for IMLS

This month President Obama appointed Susan Hildreth as the new director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The Institute, an independent U. S. government agency, is the primary source of federal support for the nation's 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.

Hildreth will serve a four-year term as the Director of the Institute. The directorship of the Institute alternates between individuals from the museum and library communities. Hildreth leaves her current position as director of the Seattle Public Library and previously served as California's state librarian. Read more.

 "Compare Public Libraries" an online tool

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) website includes "Compare Public Libraries," an online tool with data from over 9,000 U.S. libraries for users to create statistical comparisons between a library (one's local library, for example) and other similar public libraries. Originally created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), "Compare Public Libraries" currently uses FY2008 data collected from the IMLS Public Libraries Survey. Read more.  

OCLC New Report: Perceptions of Libraries, 2010

According to a new study released this month by OCLC, a nonprofit library services and research organization, Americans are using their libraries more than ever as a result of the economic downturn. Perceptions of Libraries 2010: Context and Community follows a similar study done in 2005 and provides new and updated information on the public's perceptions and preferences concerning libraries and library services and how changes in the economic climate have impacted their use of libraries. To read/download the report, go to: http://www.oclc.org/us/en/news/releases/2011/20115.htm

Report on Internet Use

Librarians and others may be familiar with reports issued over the years from the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project.  In December, Pew released Generations 2010, a report by Kathryn Zickuhr that shows trends by age (generation) in Internet use.  Among the findings in this report:

  • "While the youngest generations are still significantly more likely to use social network sites, the fastest growth has come from internet users 74 and older: social network site usage for this oldest cohort has quadrupled since 2008, from 4% to 16%. Read more.
The Libri Foundation Offers 2011
"Books for Children" Grants

The Libri Foundation is a nationwide non-profit organization which donates new, quality, hardcover children's books to small, rural public libraries throughout the United States.  Since October 1990, the Foundation has donated over $4,600,000 worth of new children's books to more than 3,000 libraries in 49 states.

In order to encourage and reward local support of libraries, The Libri Foundation will match any amount of money raised by your local sponsors from $50 to $350 on a 2-to-1 ratio.  Thus, a library can receive up to $1,050 worth of new children's books.  After a library receives a grant, local sponsors (such as formal or informal Friends groups, civic or social organizations, local businesses, etc.) have four months (or longer if necessary) to raise their matching funds. Read more.

Materials Review Sessions: Schedule and Upcoming Survey for Librarians
The spring 2011 Material Review Sessions have been scheduled for March and April.  Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene will present reviews of about 75 recently published books for children and young adults and will have on display hundreds more titles that have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books (with print copies of the reviews taped inside) will be available for perusal so librarians can see books in advance of ordering. Grace Greene will do two "live" sessions of Materials Review this spring, in Northfield and at the Georgia Public Library, and three sessions with a recorded DVD version of her presentation. The Regional Educational Technology Network (RETN) will record the Northfield presentation and that recording will be shown in the other three locations. Read more.

Amelia Bloomer Project

Joy Worland, Director of the Joslin Memorial Library in Waitsfield, highly recommends The Amelia Bloomer Project, a project of the Feminist Task Force of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association (ALA).  Founded in 2002, the Task Force's mission is to select and recommend quality feminist books for ages birth to eighteen. The committee of seven public, school and academic librarians from all over the country recently met at the ALA Midwinter Conference in San Diego to create the 2011 list. Read more.

New Booklist: A New Baby in the Family

Julie Pickett, of the Stowe Free Library and member of the Department of Libraries' Children's Services Advisory Council, has created a very helpful list of picture books about new babies. Both librarians and individuals will want to check out this new list, available in bookmark format.  Download the bookmark at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/sites/libraries/files/cbec/NewBabyInTheFamilyBookmark.pdf

Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) Conference

The ninth annual Dorothy Canfield Fisher (DCF) conference will be held on Friday, April 29, 2011 at the Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee. The keynote speaker will be Margaret Peterson Haddix, author of two very popular series of books for young readers, "The Missing" and "The Shadow Children," as well as the acclaimed books Running Out of Time and Just Ella. The afternoon speaker will be Sy Montgomery, naturalist, traveler and author, who has written many fascinating nature books, including Kakapo Rescue (this year's Sibert Award winner), The Tarantula Scientist and The Man-Eating Tigers of Sundarbans. In addition, there will be a vaierty of workshops that focus on the new DCF masterlist. Attendees can learn about new ways to incorporate technology into the library's DCF program, hands-on creative activities related to the DCF books, and more.  Books (both those on the 2011-2012 DCF master list and those written by Haddix and Montgomery) will be on sale at a 20% discount. The conference is co-sponsored by Friends of DCF, the DCF Award Committee, the Vermont Department of Libraries, the Vermont Department of Education, VT-NEA and the Vermont School Library Association (VSLA). Registration forms were sent out to all libraries and schools earlier this month. Librarians are urged to alert their 4th-8th grade teachers, too!

Summer 2011 Reading Program: fancylettersforsummerprogram

This summer Vermont public libraries will be encouraging reading and celebrating cultural diversity and travel  using colorful materials produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a  49-state group which uses its resources and buying power to provide high-quality materials at very low prices. As always, the Department of Libraries will cover the cost for reading records, posters, bookmarks and certificates for all participating Vermont libraries and bookmobiles. DOL ordered the materials in December and libraries should receive all their materials by April 1.Read more.

PBS KIDS GO! Writing Contest for Children

The Department of Libraries is a Community Partner in the PBS KIDS GO! Writers Contest, a local contest designed to promote reading, writing and art through hands-on, active learning. The contest encourages children in grades K-3 to celebrate the power of stories and illustrations by creating and submitting their own original pieces. Children may create their stories as part of a program at a public library or at a school, or they may do it totally on their own at home. Read more. 

Bristol Library Celebrates Centennial

Lawrence Memorial Library in Bristol has begun a year-long bithday celebration.  Back in 1911 William Lawrence gave a building for a library to the town of Bristol for $1.00 and dedicated the library to his two deceased wives, Minnie Peet Lawrence and Lockie Partch Lawrence.  For the past 100 years the Lawrence Memorial Library has provided library service to local citizens and, though it has seen its share of renovations, the building has much of its original character.  This year the library is celebrating with the yearlong theme: "A Century of Stories."  The celebration began on January 11 with a 100th birthday party - a day of entertainment, readings, storytimes and food. Other events scheduled this year include a potluck and cooking demo (February) and the relase of a library centennial cookbook and gala dinner/dance (June). For more information, check the Lawrence Memorial Library website at:  http://www.lawrencelibrary.net/

        checkitout

Again this month staff members at the Department of Libraries weighed in with the books that thrilled, inspired or moved them as children. Here are their recommendations - great books to curl up with on a cold winter's night:

bookjacket Tale of Pigling blandGrace Greene, Youth Services Consultant: My mother read to me all the time when I was a child and my father some, but much less so. However, when I was sick, he always read to me The Tale of Pigling Bland because it was his favorite Beatrix Potter story. To this day, all you have to say is, "'Yus, yus, yus,' said Aunt Pettitoes" and I will feel much better!

 

Read more


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT
                                            SLA From the Vermont State Librarian

The beginning a new year always brings an air of change and new promise. This year I didn't make any of my usual resolutions (more exercise, better diet, finally reading War and Peace) because I know those by heart. But I am enjoying the new energy that comes with a change in government leadership and have been paying special attention to what Governor Shumlin has been saying in his first days in office. I am delighted to report that I have been re-appointed as Vermont's State Librarian and look forward to working with the new Administration on issues of interest to libraries, including life-long learning, workforce development, early literacy, economic development and broadband.


If you did not hear or read Governor Shumlin's Inaugural and Budget addresses, I encourage you to do so at:
http://governor.vermont.gov/  Much of what he is talking about has a direct connection to libraries. Life-long learning? Libraries know all about that - from summer reading programs for children to instruction in our college and school libraries to book discussions and other programming for adult citizens. Pre-school education? In 2010 the Department of Libraries and the Vermont Public Library Foundation, in partnership with the Vermont Center for the Book, launched the Early Literacy Initiative which is changing the way librarians present storytime programs for young children and their parents. Broadband? We know that libraries must have high-speed, high-capacity broadband Internet to meet the demands of students and citizens. That's why our Department chose to partner on two federal broadband grant projects that will bring new equipment or high-speed connections to more than 70 Vermont public libraries. Reduce the number of people who enter our prison system? We know that the ability to read is a strong indicator for success in life and libraries offer programs and literacy support in our local communities that help citizens make wise life decisions. Help for citizens who need jobs or access to government services?  Libraries provide public computing centers and one-on-one assistance  for citizens who need e-government resources, seek employment or need information on job training, education and careers.


 
It's no surprise to hear that Vermont's economic woes are far from over - or to hear that  libraries across the state are experiencing budget problems similar to those being discussed  in Montpelier. But I know that libraries have an important role in ensuring economic health and vitality in our communities. And I know  that our libraries can help Vermonters make the necessary connections between problems and the solutions to those problems. My job in the coming year will be to make sure policymakers also know about those connections so that together we can lay the groundwork for strong 21st century libraries.

 

As always, I welcome your comments, ideas and suggestions.


Martha Reid


e-vte-Vermont Community Broadband Project Update

The Department of Libraries is a partner in the e-Vermont Community Broadband Project, funded with a federal stimulus Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) grant. In 2010 twelve Vermont communities (including all of Grand Isle County) were selected as e-Vermont Communities. Under the direction of the Vermont Council on Rural Development, DOL is working with a variety of partners and with local schools, libraries, businesses and community organizations to develop web-based services and resources, provide computer training for local residents and to stimulate use of local Internet service. The grant includes $96,000 for the purchase of computers and other equipment for public libraries in these e-VT towns. DOL is currently finalizing orders for new computers, laptops, iPads, printers and scanners, and other equipment for the Year One project libraries.

In December  the e-Vermont project team reviewed applications from Vermont towns and selected twelve additional communities that will receive support, services, and funding from this grant project in 2011: Bridgewater, Calais, Castleton, Dover, Fairfield, Hardwick, Jay/Westfield, Middletown Springs, Moretown, Morristown, Richford, and Vergennes. DOL will work with the libraries in these towns over the next several months so that they can develop their own proposals for the use of grant funds. For more information about the e-Vermont project, go to: http://vtrural.org/programs/e-vermont/e-vermont-selects-2011-communities

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statisticsProject MERGE and the Vermont State Library

If you act quickly, you can hear an unusual sound on the fourth floor of the Vermont State Library - an echo!  The volumes which once lined the shelves (and deadened any noise) have been removed to make room for books being moved up from the first floor of the library.  The volumes from the first floor are being moved to make room for those arriving from the Midstate Library Service Center whose volumes are being moved, in turn, to make room for books from the Northeast Regional Library.  Such is the cascade effect of Project MERGE.


The content of the books which once graced the fourth floor stacks is still available (on site) in reprints and online, and those alternate sources rendered those books superfluous years ago and made them easy choices for disposal last month.  But it was a lot of books - enough to create a space big enough for an echo.

 

How does a library go about removing that kind of "volume"?  State Law Librarian Paul Donovan had the task of designating books for removal. Secondhand book dealers took a few, and some were taken by private individuals, but when all was said and done, we were still confronted with the task of removing nearly ten thousand volumes, and that presented a logistical problem. Most of these books were hopelessly out of date and of no interest to anyone but those in the recycling business.

 

Enter Mark and Chris of McClure Moving of Essex Junction.  In three days, this army of two moved the books down four flights of stairs using our dumbwaiter which, when fully (and frighteningly) burdened, still held fewer than fifty volumes at a time.  From the first floor, the books went out to the loading dock and onto their truck.  They made short work of the intimidating task, and the fourth floor is now ready for its new collection.  A video of the staff shifting collections and the transformation of the fourth floor is here:

http://libraries.vermont.gov/newsletters/multimedia_content
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U-32U-32 School Library "Exemplary" Designation

Nancy Everhart, President of the American Association of School Libraries (AASL) will visit Vermont in May as part of her national Vision Tour. The Vision Tour takes AASL's Learning4Life initiative "on-the-road" by showcasing exemplary school libraries across the nation, including the U-32 school library in Vermont. During the tour, Everhart plans to visit a school library in every state in the U.S. with the goal of bringing to the general public visual models of what good school libraries offer students and communities. 
 

The Vermont School Library Association (VSLA) named the U-32 School Library an Exemplary School Library "dedicated to empowering every student with the skills needed to be a learner for life."  Located just outside Montpelier, U-32 serves students in grades 7-12 from the towns of Berlin, East Montpelier, Calais, Middlesex and Worcester. Everhart will visit the school on May 17 to tour the school and library and speak to students, teachers and invited guests about the importance of school libraries, school library staffing and literacy related to school and life-long success.  In promoting her tour and the value of school libraries, Everhart stated that "finding information today is a whole different ballgame - one that requires knowing how to use both print and computer resources. Our children must be able to do it all if they are to succeed in the next century.  Since 1965 more than 60 education and library studies have produced clear evidence that school library media programs staffed by qualified library media specialists have a positive impact on student academic achievement."

 

Congratulations to U-32 librarians Dan Greene and Vicky Palmer and the rest of the school library staff!

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louisaBrownell Library Awarded "Louisa May Alcott"

Congratulations to the Brownell Library in Essex Junction! The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced that Brownell Library is one of 30 libraries that will receive $2,500 grants to support five reading, viewing and discussion programs featuring the documentary "Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women."
 
  

The library outreach program for "Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women," a collaboration among NEH, the ALA Public Programs Office and Nancy Porter and Harriet Reisen for Filmmakers Collaborative, has been designated as part of NEH's We the People initiative, exploring significant events and themes in our nation's history and culture and advancing knowledge of the principles that define America. Funding was provided by a major grant from NEH to the ALA Public Programs Office.

 

The 30 selected libraries will present five reading, viewing and discussion programs focused on Alcott, her body of work and her era. Libraries will enlist a lead project scholar with expertise in 19th-century American history or literature to help present and plan programs. For more information, visit www.ala.org/louisamayalcott.

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imlsNew Director Named for Institute of Museum and Library Services

This month President Obama appointed Susan Hildreth as the new director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The Institute, an independent U. S. government agency, is the primary source of federal support for the nation's 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.

 

Hildreth will serve a four-year term as the Director of the Institute. The directorship of the Institute alternates between individuals from the museum and library communities. Hildreth leaves her current position as director of the Seattle Public Library and previously served as California's state librarian. Prior to that she served as deputy director and then city librarian at the San Francisco Public Library. Her background also includes five years as deputy library director at the Sacramento Public Library, several years as Placer County's head librarian and four years as library director for the Benicia Public Library, all in California. She began her career as a branch librarian at the Edison Township Library in New Jersey.

Active in the American Library Association, Hildreth served as president of the Public Library Association in 2006. She has a master's degree in library science from State University of New York, Albany, a master's degree in business administration from Rutgers University and a B.A. from Syracuse University.  

 

Vermont State Librarian Martha Reid cheered the decision. "I am thrilled that Susan Hildreth will be moving to head the Institute of Museum and Library Services.  I know Susan from her work with COSLA (Chief Officers of State Library Agencies) - she is a dedicated professional and a real champion for libraries. I look forward to her arrival at IMLS and to new intitiaves that will emerge under her leadership."


IMLS administers a wide variety of programs and services, including the Grants to State Library Administrative Agencies program, which gives federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grants to states. In FFY10 the Vermont Department of Libraries received $1,447,508 in LSTA funding from IMLS. These funds are used to support continuing education programs and consulting services for Vermont public libraries, the Vermont Online Library, the Vermont Automated Library System (VALS), the summer reading program for children in public libraries, the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and resource sharing grants for public and academic libraries. To learn more about IMLS, please visit www.imls.gov.
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compare"Compare Public Libraries" - an online tool

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) website includes "Compare Public Libraries," an online tool with data from over 9,000 U.S. libraries for users to create statistical comparisons between a library (one's local library, for example) and other similar public libraries. Originally created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), "Compare Public Libraries" currently uses FY2008 data collected from the IMLS Public Libraries Survey.

 

Vermont librarians and trustees should be aware of this tool as they prepare budgets, presentations and strategic plans. The tool allows a searcher to compare specific libraries, or a group of libraries which share selected characteristics, and then creates a report. For instance, a searcher can compare all libraries in a given county to find the populations of library service areas, the size of library staff, expenditure totals, revenues per capita, etc. Or one can compare two specific libraries that are known to be similar in size, town economics or revenues. This is a great way to compare libraries within Vermont, or to compare one's library with libraries in similar-sized towns in other states. In some cases, the results can be quickly converted to a useful chart.

 

Those who are looking for information on public library statistics will want to look at both the Vermont Public Library Statistics (at the DOL website) and the "Library Statistics" pages at the IMLS site: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/publib.asp

 To access the "Compare Public Libraries" tool, see: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/compare/index.asp

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localgovLocal Government Day - February 16

Local Government Day in the Legislature, co-sponsored by the Vermont League of Cities and Towns and the Vermont Municipal Clerks & Treasurers Association,will take place on Wednesday, February 16, 2011, starting at 9:00 a.m. at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Montpelier.  Registration begins at 8:15 a.m. that day. Directors of libraries in VLCT member towns may want to join their municipal government colleagues for the day. If so, we invite librarians and others to visit the Department of Libraries during the day. Let us know that you are coming by contacting Renee Ancel at 828-3266/ renee.ancel@state.vt.us


 Local Government Day is arranged for local officials to hear about the status of pending legislation from VLCT and the Vermont Municipal Clerks' and Treasurers' Association representatives, attend legislative hearings and speak with their representatives and senators at the Vermont Legislature.

This event begins at the Capitol Plaza Hotel then moves to the State House for activities and meetings. In the afternoon there will be opportunities for members to sit in on additional legislative committee meetings. Registration is $35.00 with lunch (at the Capitol Plaza) or $20.00 without lunch. (Those opting to register without lunch should indicate such in the comments section). Registration deadline is Wednesday, February 9. Those registering after February 9 will pay an additional $10.00 per person. For more information, and to register: http://www.vlct.org/eventscalendar/upcomingevents/?event=363

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 internetReport on Internet Use
 
Librarians and others may be familiar with reports issued over the years from the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project.  In December, Pew released Generations 2010, a report by Kathryn Zickuhr that shows trends by age (generation) in Internet use.  Among the findings in this report:

  • "While the youngest generations are still significantly more likely to use social network sites, the fastest growth has come from internet users 74 and older: social network site usage for this oldest cohort has quadrupled since 2008, from 4% to 16%.
  • The percentage of all adult internet users who watch video onlinejumped 14 points in the past two years, from 52% in May 2008 to 66% in May 2010.
  • 51% of all online adults listen to music online, compared with 34% the last time this question was asked, in June 2004. While Millennials used to be by far the most avid listeners, Gen Xers and Younger Boomers are catching up.
  • As of May 2010, 53% of online adults have used a classified ads websitesuch as Craigstlist, up from 32% in September 2007."

The report also noted that "certain key internet uses are becoming more uniformly popular across all age groups. These online activities include seeking health information, purchasing products, making travel reservations, and downloading podcasts."  Read the entire report at:  http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Generations-2010.aspx

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 AmeliaAmelia Bloomer Project

Joy Worland, Director of the Joslin Memorial Library in Waitsfield, highly recommends The Amelia Bloomer Project, a project of the Feminist Task Force of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association (ALA).  Founded in 2002, the Task Force's mission is to select and recommend quality feminist books for ages birth to eighteen. The committee of seven public, school and academic librarians from all over the country recently met at the ALA Midwinter Conference in San Diego to create the 2011 list.

Worland has been following this project since she first heard of it when working on her MLS degree and was thrilled for the chance to participate this year, spending hours with smart, opinionated, passionate committee members who evaluated over 100 books to create this year's list of 68 books.

The 2011 booklist is a diverse compilation, including a picture book about a girl sherpa, a graphic novel about a girl fencer with the potential to save the world, a "zine" of advice for teen girls, and many more works of fiction and non-fiction exploring and celebrating the stories of resilient and inspiring girls and women.  For more about the project and to see the complete 2011 list, go to: http://ameliabloomer.wordpress.com/

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libriThe Libri Foundation Offers 2011 "Books for Children" Grants

The Libri Foundation is a nationwide non-profit organization which donates new, quality, hardcover children's books to small, rural public libraries throughout the United States.  Since October 1990, the Foundation has donated over $4,600,000 worth of new children's books to more than 3,000 libraries in 49 states.

 

In order to encourage and reward local support of libraries, The Libri Foundation will match any amount of money raised by your local sponsors from $50 to $350 on a 2-to-1 ratio.  Thus, a library can receive up to $1,050 worth of new children's books.  After a library receives a grant, local sponsors (such as formal or informal Friends groups, civic or social organizations, local businesses, etc.) have four months (or longer if necessary) to raise their matching funds.

 

The librarian of each participating library selects the books her library will receive from a booklist provided by the Foundation.  The 700-plus fiction and nonfiction titles on the booklist reflect the very best of children's literature published primarily in the last three years. These titles, which are for children ages 12 and under, are award-winners or have received starred reviews in library, literary, or education journals.  The booklist also includes a selection of classic children's titles.

 

Libraries are qualified on an individual basis.  In general, county libraries should serve a population under 16,000 and town libraries should serve a population under 10,000 (usually under 5,000).  Libraries should be in a rural area, have a limited operating budget, and an active children's department.

 

Please note:  Rural is usually considered to be at least 30 miles from a city with a population over 40,000.  Town libraries with total operating budgets over $150,000 and county libraries with total operating budgets over $350,000 are rarely given grants.

 

Applications are accepted from independent libraries as well as libraries which are part of a county, regional, or cooperative library system.

 

A school library may apply only if it also serves as the public library (i.e. it is open to the everyone in the community, has some summer hours, and there is no public library in town).

 

A branch library may apply if the community it is in meets the definition of rural.  If the branch library receives its funding from its parent institution, then the parent institution's total operating budget, not just the branch library's total operating budget, must meet the budget guidelines.

 

Previous "Books for Children" grant recipients are eligible to apply for another grant three years after the receipt of their last grant. Libraries that do not fulfill all grant requirements, including the final report, may not apply for another grant.

 

The next application deadline for 2011 is: (postmarked by) April 15th.  Grants will be awarded April 30th.

 

The names of grant recipients will be posted on the Foundation's website a few days after grants are awarded. Acceptance packets are usually mailed 14-18 days after grants are awarded.

Please note: The application deadline is based on postmark date, not arrival date.

 

Application guidelines and forms may be downloaded from the Foundation's website at:  www.librifoundation.org.  For more information about The Libri Foundation or its "Books for Children" program, please contact Ms. Barbara J. McKillip, President, The Libri Foundation, PO Box 10246, Eugene, OR  97440.  541-747-9655 (phone); 541-747-4348 (fax); libri@librifoundation.org (email). Normal office hours are:  Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Pacific Time.

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materialsMaterials Review Sessions: Schedule and Upcoming Survey for Librarians

 The spring 2011 Material Review Sessions have been scheduled for March and April.  Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene will present reviews of about 75 recently published books for children and young adults and will have on display hundreds more titles that have been favorably reviewed by volunteer Vermont reviewers or, in the case of nonfiction, the review media. All books (with print copies of the reviews taped inside) will be available for perusal so librarians can see books in advance of ordering. Grace Greene will do two "live" sessions of Materials Review this spring, in Northfield and at the Georgia Public Library, and three sessions with a recorded DVD version of her presentation. The Regional Educational Technology Network (RETN) will record the Northfield presentation and that recording will be shown in the other three locations. The books, with the print reviews, will accompany the DVD presentation, so participants at all sites will have access to all the books.  The schedule is as follows:
 

Wednesday, March 23 Thursday, March 24 

Tuesday, March 29

Thursday, March 31 

Tuesday, April 5

Brown Public Library, Northfield 

Georgia Public Library

Northeast Regional Library, St. Johnsbury

Kurn Hattin, Westminster

Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington

LIVE!

LIVE! 

 

 


All programs begin at 9:00 a.m. Registration is not required. In addition to the formal part of the program, there will be plenty of time for participants to examine the books. For those who cannot attend any of these programs, the presentation will be streamed live on the RETN website: http://www.retn.org/

The accompanying bibliography will be available at the DOL website:

http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/mrs

 

The Department of Libraries will be looking carefully at its Materials Review program this spring to see if changes are in order. Attendance has fallen and the recorded session is available for viewing at any time, thanks to RETN. DOL will ask librarians to give their input through a survey later in the year, and any changes will be announced before school begins in the fall.

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summerSummer 2011 Reading Program:  "One World, Many Stories"

This summer Vermont public libraries will be encouraging reading and celebrating cultural diversity and travel  using colorful materials produced by the Collaborative Summer Library Program, a  49-state group which uses its resources and buying power to provide high-quality materials at very low prices. As always, the Department of Libraries will cover the cost for reading records, posters, bookmarks and certificates for all participating Vermont libraries and bookmobiles. DOL ordered the materials in December and libraries should receive all their materials by April 1. DOL will place a second order in February.  Libraries that missed the first deadline will still be able to get free materials if they get their order to DOL no later than February 4.  The order form is available at:http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/srp/childrenteen

 

This year the theme focuses on different cultures and places.   The slogan for children is "One World, Many Stories"; for teens it is "You are Here," and for adults it is "Novel Destinations."  DOL will present workshops at two locations in March to prepare librarians for the summer reading program; librarians can attend on Wednesday, March 16 in Northfield, or Wednesday, March 23 at the Rockingham Free Library. DOL Library Consultant Amy Howlett (Rockingham) and DOL Youth Services Consultant Grace Greene (Northfield) will give librarians plenty of ideas on programs, books, decorations, international food and performers to make summer a fun-filled time for readers. For more information and to register: http://evanced.info/vtdol/evanced/eventcalendar.asp

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PBSPBS KIDS GO! Writing Contest for Children

The Department of Libraries is a Community Partner in the PBS KIDS GO! Writers Contest, a local contest designed to promote reading, writing and art through hands-on, active learning. The contest encourages children in grades K-3 to celebrate the power of stories and illustrations by creating and submitting their own original pieces. Children may create their stories as part of a program at a public library or at a school, or they may do it totally on their own at home. A panel of Vermont experts including authors and librarians, will judge entries and select three winners from each grade. The winners will be announced in late April and will be featured on-air, online and at an awards ceremony broadcast on Vermont Public Television.

 

Contest participants will receive a certificate of achievement, as well as an opportunity to read their story aloud at storytime celebrations held at various locations throughout the state. Entries must be submitted with an official entry form and must meet contest rules.

To enter, visit http://www.vpt.org/writers or call 1-800-639-3351 for contest rules and an entry form.

Contest Entry Deadline: Friday, April 8, 2011

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 checkitout     checkitoutlogo
 

Again this month staff members at the Department of Libraries weighed in with the books that thrilled, inspired or moved them as children. Here are their recommendations - great books to curl up with on a cold winter's night:

 

bookjacket Tale of Pigling blandGrace Greene, Youth Services Consultant: My mother read to me all the time when I was a child and my father some, but much less so. However, when I was sick, he always read to me The Tale of Pigling Bland because it was his favorite Beatrix Potter story. To this day, all you have to say is, "'Yus, yus, yus,' said Aunt Pettitoes" and I will feel much better!


 


  bookjacketgrim'sMichael Roche, Regional Library Consultant: My father constantly read to us Grimms' Fairy Tales, Mother Goose rhymes and stories that were told to him when he was a child. That's probably why even to this day I tend to see things as either good or bad and still have trouble stepping on cracks in the sidewalk
.


 


bookjacketJeremiah Kellogg, Regional Library Consultant: There are two books of great significancefrom my childhood: Higglety Pigglety Pop or There Must be More to Life by Maurice Sendak and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum.  Sendak's illustrations helped put greater meaning into words for me.  The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was the first book I read on my own, subsequently leading to the request for a night-light in my room under the pretense of being afraid of the dark. The reality was that I wanted the light to read by when I was supposed to be in bed!  This started a trend of reading book after book using that little night-light until I was old enough to no longer have a set bedtime. 

bookjacketChristine Friese, Assistant State Librarian: Somewhere around ten years of age I fell hard for gothics starting with a book that haunted me for years called Jane-Emily, by Patricia Clapp. It was out of print for many years and I have met other adults my age who say things like "Ooh that book with the ghost and the gazing ball in the garden - I loved that!" Jane-Emily led me to Jane Eyre, Turn of the Screw and other gothic and mystery novels.

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ScienceNew in the Library Science Collection

Breeding, Marshall. Next-gen Library Catalogs. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.


Crosby, Connie. Effective Blogging for Libraries.  Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Czarnecki, Kelly Nicole. Gaming in Libraries.  Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Griffey, Jason. Mobile Technology and Libraries.  Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Hastings, Robin. Microblogging and Lifestreaming in Libraries. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Houghton-Jan, Sarah. Technology Training in Libraries. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Landis, Cliff. A Social Networking Primer for Librarians. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Lawson, Steve. Library Camps and Unconferences. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Pressley, Lauren. Wikis for Libraries. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Regional Library Cooperatives and the Future of Broadband.  Washington, ALA Office for Information Technology Policy, [2008]

 

Robinson, Thomas Sean Casserley. Library Videos and Webcasts. Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.

 

Sheppard, Beverly. The 21st Century Learner. Washington, Institute of Museum and Library Services, [2001]

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FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera
The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that is available for Vermont public libraries to borrow. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using Flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has posted a loan policy on the DOL website: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/cbec/flipcameraloan

For more information about borrowing the Flip, contact Renee Ancel at 802.828.3266 /

renee.ancel@state.vt.us

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