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In This Issue
News from Assistant State Librarian
12 Vermont Towns Selected
Resources for Library Trustees
State of Vermont Recognizes DOL employees
ALA Conference and Library Advocacy Day
Project Compass: Libraries Respond
Grants: The Basics
Public Library Movie License
Changes in IRS Affect VT Non-Profit
Early Literacy Project Launched
DOL Staff News
Free Online Eduaction
VT Librarians in the News
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backtopFrom the Vermont State Librarian        MartaReidVTStateLibrarian
 When I started my library career in the late 1970's "library instruction" focused on the card catalog and directing library patrons to the index in the back of a book. Some of you will remember the small satisfaction we felt when a patron learned to use the subject tracings at the bottom of a catalog card to further his or her research. Well, times have certainly changed. "Library instruction" has morphed into "information literacy" and the work that librarians do today is more complex than ever. I was thinking of all this while attending the recent Dynamic Landscapes 2.0 Conference (co-sponsored by the Vermont School Library Association, Vita-Learn and the Vermont Department of Education) and listening to keynote speaker and school librarian Debbie Abilock of NoodleTools.com. Today's school and academic librarians have the mighty task of teaching students how to evaluate online information resources, asking questions such as: Is this information current and accurate? Is the content fact or is it opinion? Is the research peer-reviewed? Read more.
News from Assistant State Librarian Christine Friese
My new favorite color is green: for Vermont and for spring!  Thank you for the warm welcome and help I've received since my arrival from Massachusetts.
 
Over the next several months I will be learning about Vermont libraries through both DOL's library consultants and visits to libraries throughout the state. This provides not only important information but a treat as well, seeing old historic buildings, listening to experienced library staff, and exploring both the needs of the people we serve and the approaches taken by different libraries. So far, I have seen the Saint Johnsbury Athenaeum and libraries in Danville, Peacham, Montpelier and Cabot. Throughout May and June I will be visiting more libraries with the regional consultants. Read more.
Twelve Vermont Towns Selected
eVermont: The Vermont Community Broadband Project that was recently awarded a $2.5 million grant from the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) of the American Recover and Reinvestment Act is off and running. The project, headed by the Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD) and Project Director Helen Jordan, will assist schools, libraries, businesses and local government in 24 Vermont towns over two years in designing and implementing a variety of digital services and programs. The Department of Libraries is a project partner.
 
The 2010 communities (selected from over 40 applicants) are: Brighton (Island Pond), Bristol, Canaan, Cambridge, Grand Isle County, Ludlow, Middlesex, Newport, Poultney, Pownal, Sunderland, and West Rutland.  (Note: some projects include adjoining towns.)
Congratulations to the selected towns! We look forward to working with the public libraries in these communities.

   Resources for Library Trustees
Expand Understanding

The Town Officer Education Conferences are over, and trustees have headed back to their primary objectives of overseeing the library and communicating with the community. The spring conferences often mark new editions of major trustee resources, and 2010 is no exception. Go online to download the 2010 edition of A Manual for Vermont Library Trustees, "Good Meeting Practice", "Resources for Vermont Trustees" and "Tips for Making Public Funding Requests," at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees. The Law of Public Libraries (updated March 2010) is available at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/librarylaw.
Read more.
Neale F. Lunderville, Caroline Earle, Gov. Jim Douglas, Darlene Nunn, Sara Blow
Neale F. Lunderville, Caroline Earle, Gov. Jim Douglas, Darlene Nunn, Sara Blow
State of Vermont Recognizes DOL Employees
Congratulations to Jennifer Hart, Darlene Nunn, and Sara Blow from DOL's Special Services Unit!  They share this year's Employee of the Year award and were honored by Governor Jim Douglas, along with honorees from other state agencies, Read more
American Library Association (ALA) Conference and Library Advocacy Day
Are you planning to attend the June ALA Conference in Washington D.C.? If so, please send an email to State Librarian, Martha Reid: martha.reid@state.vt.us - perhaps we can arrange a gathering of Vermont librarians during the conference. And are you planning to attend the Library Advocacy Day Rally?
Read more.
Project Compass: Libraries Respond in
Economic Hard Times

In 2009 the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded a grant to the State Library of North Carolina (SLNC) and WebJunction (an online community for library staff created by OCLC) to gather and share best practices for providing library programs and services to help the unemployed. Read more.
Grants: The Basics - Still Time to Register for Workshop
Vermont librarians are finding that grants are essential for funding library services in this sluggish economy. Librarians are invited to learn more about the basics of applying for and obtaining grants at one of two workshops led by Amy Howlett and Grace Greene on June 8 (St. Johnsbury) or June 10 (Killington.)
Register online at: http://evanced.info/vtdol/evanced/eventcalendar.asp

moviesposters
Public Library Movie License Continues
Good news! The Department of Libraries will once again provide Vermont public libraries* with a free public performance license from Movie Licensing USA (MLU) http://www.movlic.com/ for July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011. The current license expires June 30, 2010. This movie license permits libraries to use a wide range of films for all ages in library programs for the general public. DOL emailed the 2010-11 agreement form to public libraries and we asked that signed forms be returned by May 28. Read more.

Changes in IRS Rules May Affect Vermont Non-Profit Organizations
A change in law enacted in the 2006 Pension Protection Act requires all non-profits, even small ones, to file IRS form 990s or a simplified version of the form. Nonprofits with less than $25,000 in annual revenue were not required to file in the past, but the Pension Protection Act changed that and gave smaller groups three years (beginning in 2007) to comply. That three-year period ended on Monday, May 17. Groups that missed the deadline can apply for a new exemption, but there may be related fees. Non-profit organizations with revenue less than $25,000 should take note of this announcement from the Internal Revenue Service: Read more.
Early Literacy Project Launched
Grace W. Greene and Sally Anderson
gracegreenecherlycox
The Vermont Department of Libraries and the Vermont Center for the Book (VCB) are partnering in an exciting new statewide Early Literacy Initiative. This project is made possible by a generous gift from Dr. Burnett Rawson of Essex through the Winnie Belle Learned Fund of the Vermont Public Library Foundation and VCB grant from the Henderson Foundation. Read more.
DOL Staff News
Michael Roche attended the spring e-Rate Conference on May 11-12 in Washington, D.C. Sponsored by the American Library Association, this conference provided nuts-and-bolts information on the federally-funded Universal Service (e-Rate) program in an intensive two-day training. Michael is the e-rate Coordinator for the Department of Libraries. If your library has questions about the e-rate program, contact Michael at: michael.roche@state.vt.us or 802-828-3428.

ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT
When I started my library career in the late 1970's "library instruction" focused on the card catalog and directing library patrons to the index in the back of a book. Some of you will remember the small satisfaction we felt when a patron learned to use the subject tracings at the bottom of a catalog card to further his or her research. Well, times have certainly changed. "Library instruction" has morphed into "information literacy" and the work that librarians do today is more complex than ever. I was thinking of all this while attending the recent Dynamic Landscapes 2.0 Conference (co-sponsored by the Vermont School Library Association, Vita-Learn and the Vermont Department of Education) and listening to keynote speaker and school librarian Debbie Abilock of NoodleTools.com. Today's school and academic librarians have the mighty task of teaching students how to evaluate online information resources, asking questions such as: Is this information current and accurate? Is the content fact or is it opinion? Is the research peer-reviewed? What "rules of thumb" can we use to make wise but necessarily quick decisions about whether content is biased, out-dated, or just plain wrong? Ms. Abilock directed her audience to a wide variety of online tools and provided solid tips for helping librarians. But I was also thinking of our public librarians and wondered this: How do we help citizens become discerning users of online information? What tools can the general internet user use to find reliable content? How do we get this critical information out to the general public? These questions are part of a broader discussion that must take place in the library and education communities. In this 21st century, where "bad" online information is easily mistaken for what is documented and objective, the role of librarian as "information navigator" is essential. At a time when Google is the sole research tool for so many, how do we get the word out about using search engines and other online tools? And how do we help people understand the value of content in subscription information databases? The 21st century library is an amazing place, and while we librarians can certainly celebrate the wide range of information, ideas and opinions freely available online and the ease at which we can all contribute to the worldwide web, we also have the responsibility to help our students and community members find the very best information available to meet their needs. What better time to be a librarian, than now?
By the way, this month you can catch programming on libraries and technology, including programs from the Dynamic Landscapes 2.0 Conference at the RETN, Channel 16 website: http://www.retn.org/news/explore-libraries-technology-month-channel-16Check it out!

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ChristineNews from Assistant State Librarian Christine Friese
My new favorite color is green: for Vermont and for spring!  Thank you for the warm welcome and help I've received since my arrival from Massachusetts.
 
Over the next several months I will be learning about Vermont libraries through both DOL's library consultants and visits to libraries throughout the state. This provides not only important information but a treat as well, seeing old historic buildings, listening to experienced library staff, and exploring both the needs of the people we serve and the approaches taken by different libraries. So far, I have seen the Saint Johnsbury Athenaeum and libraries in Danville, Peacham, Montpelier and Cabot. Throughout May and June I will be visiting more libraries with the regional consultants.
 
While we are living in financially challenging times, we are also in the midst of great technical innovations allowing libraries to share ideas and resources as never before, often more quickly and efficiently. I look forward to hearing the concerns and ideas from local library staff. How can Vermont take a lead in providing the best possible services to the variety of populations we serve in the most effective manner? As I make my way around the state I hope to meet library staff, trustees and library users, but I will also be happy to receive emails, phone calls and library newsletters. Contact me at: christine.friese@state.vt.us or 802-828-2714.
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Trustees Resources for Library Trustees Expand Understanding
The Town Officer Education Conferences are over, and trustees have headed back to their primary objectives of overseeing the library and communicating with the community. The spring conferences often mark new editions of major trustee resources, and 2010 is no exception. Go online to download the 2010 edition of A Manual for Vermont Library Trustees, "Good Meeting Practice", "Resources for Vermont Trustees" and "Tips for Making Public Funding Requests," at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees. The Law of Public Libraries (updated March 2010) is available at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/librarylaw.
 
Of these documents, perhaps the most valuable is the Manual, edited by the State Librarian Martha Reid. The 2010 edition contains new material on board interactions with library personnel, and an expanded description of liability, both provided by Rob Geiszler. Check out the pages on ethical behavior for the board, informed by ALTAFF, the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations, a division of the American Library Association. The sample Ethics Policy for trustees and library employees is useful as a model and discussion starter.
 
What hasn't changed for library trustees? Basic board and director responsibilities are the same. The Open Meeting Law, described in an appendix to the Manual, is unchanged. At least one board member should be thoroughly grounded in the rules about meeting notice requirements, the public right to be heard, circumstances requiring Executive Session, and minutes publication. And yes, the Open Meeting Law applies not only to boards, but also to the committees and subcommittees they appoint. The Department of Libraries recommends that every library make copies of the Manual available to all trustees.
 
Trustees who missed the spring conferences can look forward to the annual statewide fall meeting or they can also request tailored orientation session now. Each of the DOL library consultants visits boards to present basic orientation. Rob Geiszler covers Addison, Chittenden, and Rutland counties; Amy Howlett works with Bennington, Windham, and Windsor counties; Jeremiah Kellogg covers Franklin, Grand Isle, western area of Orange counties, and most of Washington County; and Michael Roche covers Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, eastern Orange counties, and two libraries in Washington County.
 

SSU State of Vermont Recognizes DOL Employees
Congratulations to Jennifer Hart, Darlene Nunn, and Sara Blow from DOL's Special Services Unit!  They share this year's Employee of the Year award and were honored by Governor Jim Douglas, along with honorees from other state agencies, at a May luncheon celebrating Public Service Recognition Week. Jennifer, Darlene and Sara were cited for their excellence in navigating the transition of the National Library Service for the Blind & Physically Handicapped from a cassette-tape based audio book service to USB digital flash technology. The Special Services Unit (SSU) team prepared for the transition by testing procedures, adapting policies, and providing outstanding customer service. As a result of their work, eligible Vermonters are receiving new digital players and are enjoying books via this new technology. The SSU quick turn-around distribution rate ranks Vermont among the top four states in the country. As the transition continues, SSU maintains parallel tape and digital services.  
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ELIEarly Literacy Project Launched for 30 Vermont Public Libraries
The Vermont Department of Libraries and the Vermont Center for the Book (VCB) are partnering in an exciting new statewide Early Literacy Initiative. This project is made possible by a generous gift from Dr. Burnett Rawson of Essex through the Winnie Belle Learned Fund of the Vermont Public Library Foundation and VCB grant from the Henderson Foundation.
Based on research on how babies and toddlers learn, this program will change the way Vermont librarians present story time programs and will help them introduce concepts of early literacy to parents and caregivers. Two popular programs, "Beginning with Mother Goose" and the American Library Association's (ALA) "Every Child Ready to Read," will be combined and customized to serve libraries in Vermont. The Initiative began with a two-day conference at the Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee on May 11 -12 and featured keynote speaker Saroj Ghoting, one of the creators of ALA's "Every Child Ready to Learn" program and the author of Early Literacy Storytimes at Your Library (ALA. 2005). Participating librarians will attend two additional follow-up trainings scheduled for this fall and next spring.

DOL selected 30 Vermont libraries for this program from a number of library applicants. The libraries selected for this program are: Alburgh Public Library, Bennington Free Library, Lawrence Memorial Library (Bristol), Alice M. Ward Memorial Library (Canaan), Castleton Free Library, Charlotte Library, Burnham Memorial Library (Colchester), Craftsbury Public Library, Haskell Free Library (Derby Line), Brownell Library (Essex Junction), Bent Northrup Memorial Library (Fairfield), Jeudevine Library (Hardwick), Hartland Public Library, Highgate Public Library, Huntington Public Library, Lanpher Memorial Library (Hyde Park), Johnson Public Library, Sherburne Memorial Library (Killington), Cobleigh Public Library (Lyndonville), Norwich Public Library, Pawlet Public Library, Readsboro Community Library, Royalton Memorial Library (South Royalton), Springfield Town Library, St. Albans Free Library, Tunbridge Public Library, Waterbury Public Library, Baldwin Memorial Library (Wells River),Westford Public Library, and Woodbury Community Library.

Members of the Early Literacy Initiative steering committee have been working since last fall to plan the project: Cheryl Cox, Springfield Town Library; Judith Flint, Kimball Public Library, Randolph; Deborah Gadwah-Lambert, Alice Ward Library in Canaan; Beth Reynolds, Norwich Public Library, Sally Anderson and Wendy Martin, VCB, and Grace Greene, DOL.

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FreecourseFREE Online Continuing Education Programs Available for Library Staff
The Department of Libraries has purchased a selection of online courses that are available at no cost to Vermont library employees.  The courses are self-paced, and registered persons have access to the course materials for one year.
 
DOL has purchased courses from WebJunction and Lead. Courses cover a wide range of topics, including library services, management, technology, computer hardware and software applications, and web design and development. Course catalogs from WebJunction and Lead are available to those interested in taking advantage of this wonderful opportunity. After making course selections, please contact Mara Siegel, DOL Continuing Education Coordinator at mara.siegel@state.vt.us to obtain the required course coupon code.

For more information visit: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/ce/onlineopportunities

May 2010: other online continuing education opportunities are available this month and include a wide range of webinars from Library Journal, TechSoup, School Library Journal,Texas State Library & Archives Commission, WebJunction, BCR, The Foundation Center, Booklist, InfoPeople, and The Nebraska Library Commission. For more information:
http://vermontdepartmentoflibraries.wordpress.com/2010/05/03/online-continuing-education-opportunities-for-may-2010/
 

MovieLicenPublic Library Movie License Program Continues for 2010-11
Good news! The Department of Libraries will once again provide Vermont public libraries* with a free public performance license from Movie Licensing USA (MLU) http://www.movlic.com/ for July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011. The current license expires June 30, 2010. This movie license permits libraries to use a wide range of films for all ages in library programs for the general public. DOL emailed the 2010-11 agreement form to public libraries and we asked that signed forms be returned by May 28. (The agreement form is also available for download at: http://libraries.vermont.gov/movielicense.)  Once we receive a library's signed agreement we will send a license certificate by return mail. Please note that libraries must display a current movie license certificate in order to show Movie Licensing USA films for story time, book groups, and in other library programs. [*only available to Vermont public libraries which receive local tax support]
 
Movie Licensing USA offers an excellent website at http://www.movlic.comfor programming ideas and creating posters, bookmarks, and other PR materials. The website allows you to verify the titles of motion pictures covered by the MLU license and also gives guidelines for advertising films showings.
 
Please note that this MLU license only covers film studios/producers represented by MLU. Libraries that want to show motion pictures not covered by Movie License USA will need to contact other licensing agents directly. (For example, Information on Motion Picture Licensing Corporation film studios and contract pricing is available at: http://www.mplc.org/).

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ALAAmerican Library Association (ALA) Conference and Library Advocacy Day
Are you planning to attend the June ALA Conference in Washington D.C.? If so, please send an email to State Librarian, Martha Reid: martha.reid@state.vt.us - perhaps we can arrange a gathering of Vermont librarians during the conference. And are you planning to attend the Library Advocacy Day Rally?
 
Members of ALA and library supporters from around the country will be convening in Washington, DC in June to attend the annual ALA Conference.  An important part of this event will be the Library Advocacy Day Rally scheduled for June 29 at 11:00 a.m.  The event, to be held at Upper Senate Park on Capitol Hill, will provide an opportunity to celebrate all that our nation's libraries offer and to convey that message to members of Congress. We are hoping for good representation from Vermont.
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CompassProject Compass: Libraries Respond in Economic Hard Times
In 2009 the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded a grant to the State Library of North Carolina (SLNC) and WebJunction (an online community for library staff created by OCLC) to gather and share best practices for providing library programs and services to help the unemployed. As part of this initiative SNLC conducted a survey of state library agencies and planned four "Summits" for state library agency personnel to discuss best practices and to plan services to assist libraries and job-seekers in the coming year. State Librarian Martha Reid and Continuing Education Coordinator Mara Siegel attended the third Summit held earlier this month in Providence, RI.
 
As a result of trainings held at the Summit, DOL will develop an online Toolkit that will bring together a variety of information and online resources on employment, starting a small business, and coping in economic hard times for use by libraries and citizens. The Toolkit, expected for launch during FY11, will be available on the DOL website and will be a "one stop" location for libraries to use when helping patrons. To learn more about Project Compass, to see the results of the national survey, and to read about projects in other states, library staff members can log on to WebJunction at: www.webjunction.org

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vtlibrariansVT Librarians in the News
  Congratulations to these Vermont librarians!
 
Karen Hennig was honored as "Librarian of the Year" by the Vermont School Library Association on May 13 at the Dynamic Landscapes 2.0 Conference in Burlington. Karen is librarian at the Williston Central School.
 
Stephanie Chase, Director of the Stowe Free Library, has been selected as a PLA Leadership Fellow and has been awarded a scholarship to attend the "Positive Leadership" Executive Management Program in June at the Ross School of Business of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor.) To learn more about this PLA program: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/pla/plaawards/Leadership/index.cfm
 
In case you did not see it, the 2010 Pittsford Town Report includes a dedication to Bonnie Stewart, Director of the Maclure Library in Pittsford.
 

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IRSChanges in IRS Rules May Affect Vermont Non-Profit Organizations
A change in law enacted in the 2006 Pension Protection Act requires all non-profits, even small ones, to file IRS form 990s or a simplified version of the form. Nonprofits with less than $25,000 in annual revenue were not required to file in the past, but the Pension Protection Act changed that and gave smaller groups three years (beginning in 2007) to comply. That three-year period ended on Monday, May 17. Groups that missed the deadline can apply for a new exemption, but there may be related fees. Non-profit organizations with revenue less than $25,000 should take note of this announcement from the Internal Revenue Service:
 
"Generally, tax-exempt organizations must file an annual information return. Tax-exempt organizations that have annual gross receipts not normally in excess of $25,000 are not required to file the annual information return, but may be required to file an annual electronic notice (e-Postcard) Form 990-N. In addition, churches and certain religious organizations, certain state and local instrumentalities, and other organizations are excepted from the annual return filing requirement. For more information, download Publication 557, Tax-Exempt Status for Your Organization. In addition, Publications 4221-PC and 4221-PF explain the filing and recordkeeping rules that apply to section 501(c)(3) tax-exempt public charities and private foundations respectively.
 
Tax-exempt organizations, other than private foundations, must file Form 990, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax, or Form 990-EZ, Short Form Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. The Form 990-EZ is designed for use by small tax-exempt organizations and nonexempt charitable trusts. An organization may file Form 990-EZ, instead of Form 990, only if it satisfies thresholds relating to its gross receipts during the year and its total assets (as shown in the balance sheet of Form 990-EZ) at the end of the year. If your organization fails to meet either of these conditions, you cannot file Form 990-EZ. Instead you must file Form 990. All private foundations exempt under 501(c)(3) must file Form 990-PF, Return of Private Foundation.
 
Form 990, Form 990-EZ, or Form 990-PF must be filed by the 15th day of the 5th month after the end of your organization's accounting period. Instructions for Form 990, Form 990-EZ, and Form 990-PF indicate the Service Center to which they must be sent." 
 
You can read more at: http://www.irs.gov/charities/article/0,,id=96103,00.html and www.nccs.urban.org, as well as in this article from the Rutland Herald: http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20100515/NEWS04/5150355/1004/NEWS03

FlipBorrow a Flip Video Camera

The Vermont Public Library Foundation has purchased a Flip Video Ultra camcorder that will be available for Vermont public libraries to borrow beginning May 24. The Department of Libraries will handle the loan of this equipment and we encourage public libraries to borrow this equipment to practice using flip video technology, for staff development activities, training, marketing and PR, programming, etc. DOL has a loan policy which will be posted this month on the DOL website. For more information, contact Renee Ancel at 802.828.3266 / renee.ancel@state.vt.us

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sCIENCENew in the Library Science Collection
Barber, Peggy.  Building a buzz : libraries & word-of-mouth marketing.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Chmara, Theresa. Privacy and confidentiality issues : a guide for libraries and their lawyers.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2009.
 
Giesecke, Joan.  Fundamentals of library supervision.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Hernon, Peter. Assessing service quality : satisfying the expectations of library customers. Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Hooper, Brad. Writing reviews for readers' advisory.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Husband, Janet.  Sequels : an annotated guide to novels in series.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2009.
 
Information literacy instruction handbook.  Chicago : Association of College and Research Libraries, 2008.
 
Librarians as community partners : an outreach handbook. Chicago :
Service learning : linking library education and practice.
Chicago : American Library Association, 2009.
 
Reed, Sally Gardner.  The complete library trustee handbook.  New York : Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2010.
 
Singer, Paula M.  Succession planning in the library : developing leaders, managing change.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Woodward, Jeannette A.  Countdown to a new library : managing the building project.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2010.
 
Woodward, Jeannette A.  Creating the customer-driven academic library.  Chicago : American Library Association, 2009.

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