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June 2009

Visit the Gardens
by Jerry Goodspeed, Ogden Botanical Garden

It has been a great spring in the Gardens! The flowers are blooming, the trees are growing, and the weather is warming. This is a great time of the year to walk through an arboretum, enjoy the aroma of a rose garden, or take a hike through a mountain glade. 

We want to thank all those who have helped make this spring so successful in our gardens. We have had some great classes, fun activities and a wonderful plant sale. Our Food Bank Garden at the Utah Botanical Center is planted, growing, and we already have volunteers signing up to help with the care of the gardens. If you, your family or a group would like to help with the garden this summer, please call Stacie at 801-451-3403. All the food grown in the Food Bank garden will be donated to the food bank to help out those in need. 

We greatly appreciate all your support and help. We will continue to work hard and create beautiful spaces where a family can enjoy and learn of the wonders and beauties of nature. Please stop by the Gardens, take a peaceful stroll and say hi.

Blooms in the Garden
by Jerry Goodspeed

Right now there are a number of plants in bloom in the Gardens and it is a good time to come by, take a walk, and see what you might want to incorporate into your own garden.  Here is a list of some of the more colorful perennials blooming right now:

Firewitch Dianthus: look for the small mound covered with delicate pink flowers.
Ho
mestead Verbena: this creeping plant will soon be covered in purple blooms.
Iris: they will peak around the first week of June this year.
Penstemon: spikes of red, purple, pink and orange will raise 1 to 2 feet above these plants.
Helianthemum: also called a sunrose, these low growing plants are found in colors of red, pink, orange and yellow.
Callirhoe: this ground cover, also known as wine cups, has a pink to purple flower
Hymenoxys: Common name is sundancer daisy, it has yellow flowers that rise 6 inches above the mounding plant.


Featured Pest:
Lilac Root Weevil
by Jerry Goodspeed


The lilac root weevil is the pest that notches the leaves of many of our ornamentals. The adults eat almost a perfect little half circle in the leaves. They feed at night and can attack a number of different plants. The larva feed on the roots. For more information go to  http://utahpests.usu.edu/ or http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05551.html
 
Codling Moth Update: http://utahpests.usu.edu/ipm/files/uploads/AdvisoryUpdates/Advisory09/Fruit-IPM-05-20-09.pdf

Featured Tree:
Purple Robe Locust
by JayDee Gunnell

Purple Robe Locust
(Robinia pseudoacacia 'Purple Robe')
Type:  Medium-large flowering tree
Zone:   4-8 (to -30F)
Size:    30-40 feet tall
            25-35 feet wide
Description: Purple Robe locust is considered to be the "prettiest" of the black locusts. Showy pink-blushed, pea-like flowers are born from mid to late May. The tree is an extremely vigorous growing tree and can tolerate difficult areas including wet, poorly-drained soils. I have seen this tree planted in standing water...and thrive afterwards. Unlike other fast growing trees, this locust is considered extremely hard-wooded. However, all is not "rosy" with this tree selection; included bark and weakly attached branches break easily, especially in high wind areas. The longevity of this tree is also limited by a common insect pest, the Locust borer. This borer riddles the trunk and branches by burrowing into the wood, limiting water and nutrient flow as well as physically weakening the tree. Sadly, pretty in pink doesn't always translate into permanence in the landscape.


Upcoming Programs and Events


► "15th Anniversary Gala"
Friday, June 26 at the Ogden Botanical Gardens
-Come and celebrate our 15 years of the Ogden Botanical Gardens providing beauty and education. We will have art, some music and a little food. Master Gardeners and the Garden's Staff will also be conducting garden tours. More information will follow.  

Free Plant Diagnostic Clinics
UBC: Tuesdays, 1-4 p.m. at the Davis County Courthouse in Farmington
OBG: Wednesdays, 3-6 p.m. at the Ogden Botanical Gardens

-Walk in with a sample of something you are having problems with in the landscape and leave with a better understanding of the problem and some helpful solutions.
 
Soap-making with Connie Bott, Weber County Master Gardener
Thursday, July 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Ogden Botanical Gardens
Thursday, July 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Utah Botanical Center
-If you have always wanted to learn how to make soap and create your own fragrances, this class is for you.  Participants will leave with their own soap creation and a working knowledge of how to do it at home.

Call to pre-register now and save a spot in the class. Seating in classes is limited, so call TODAY!
Fee: $25/OBG-UBC members; $30/nonmembers*

Designing Japanese Gardens for Your Landscape
Friday, July 17, 12-1 p.m. at the Ogden Botanical Gardens

Drying Flowers & Making Botanical Cards Class
September - More information to follow.

Fresh Flower Arranging Class
October - More information to follow.

Utah Botanical Center Farmers Market
Thursdays, July 16 - October 1, 5-8 p.m. at the Utah Botanical Center, 920 S. 50 West, Kaysville
-The Farmers Market is a great addition to the educational and recreational experiences the Utah Botanical Center provides. We are excited about the opportunity to host the Farmers Market to enrich the lives of people in surrounding communities and support local growers, gourmet food producers, and artisans. Visit http://utahbotanicalcenter.org/htm/events/farmersmarket for more information.


Click here for a complete list of events at the Utah Botanical Center
Click here for a complete list of events at the Ogden Botanical Gardens


Get Growing Calendar

► Thin fruit on apple, pear and peach trees for better-tasting, larger, quality fruit. (leave 6" between fruit)
► Plant perennials that provide color
► Fertilize annuals with a water-soluble fertilizer
► Put on the second application of pre-emergent to the lawn
► Irrigate the lawn 1 to 2 inches of water per week
► Deadhead all the spring blooming perennials
► Remove the dead foliage from spring blooming bulbs
► Apply nitrogen fertilizer to potatoes and corn
► Check the sprinkler system to ensure proper coverage
► Prune shrubs that bloomed, such as lilacs and forsythia
► To prevent worms, begin spraying cherries when they start turning from green to slightly pink or whitish


CONTACT INFORMATION
UTAH BOTANICAL CENTER-801-593-8969                                                                  OGDEN BOTANICAL GARDENS-801-399-8080
725 South Sego Lily Drive                                                                                                                 1181 North Fairgrounds Drive
Kaysville, Utah 84401                                                                                                                                           Ogden, Utah 84404
http://utahbotanicalcenter.org                                                                                                    http://extension.usu.edu/weber
GARDENING HELP LINE                                                                                                                                      GARDENING HELP LINE
Phone: 801-451-3204 (M,W,F) 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.                                              Phone: 801-399-8080 (Mon-Fri) 12:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Click Here for Map                                                                                                                                                  Click Here for Map
 
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