November 29, 2010

In This Update
Some Genie Lifts Have Problems with Jib Boom Pins
National Handwashing Awareness Week
NIOSH Releases Prevention Through Design (PtD) Plan
Recalls Bosch Hammer Drills Due to Electrical Shock Hazard
2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care Issued
Study Says Shiftwork Doubles Injury Risk
OSHA To Hold Hearing on Proposed Rule for Falls In General Industry
Reduction in Lost Workday Case Rate Tops Nine Percent
OSHA Hosts Meeting on Globally Harmonized System of Labeling Chemicals
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Chip DawsonThis health, safety and environment electronic update comes from Chip Dawson and the Rochester Business Alliance as a service to member organizations.
Some Genie Lifts Have Problems with Jib Boom Pins
Genie Industries has issued Campaign Bulletin 100007 that deals with a fractured jib assembly pin on several models of its telescopic booms. If you own or use a Genie telescopic boom, contact your Genie dealer to determine if your lift is involved and to schedule a repair visit, if necessary.

National Handwashing Awareness Week 

The Henry the Hand Foundation is sponsoring National Handwashing Awareness Week Dec. 5-11. Washing your hands regularly helps prevent disease and helps keep infection from spreading. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides these guidelines for hand washing:

  • Wet hands with running water; place soap in palms; rub together to make a lather; scrub hands vigorously for 20 seconds; rinse soap off hands
  • If possible, use a disposable paper towel to turn off the faucet
  • Do not dry hands on clothing. Use a disposable paper towel (or air dryer)
  • Assist young children with washing their hands
You can read more about Henry the Hand Principles, National Handwashing Awareness Week by clicking here. For more from the CDC on handwashing, click here

NIOSH Releases Prevention Through Design (PtD) Plan 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has released a plan for preventing work-related injuries and illnesses by designing occupational hazards out of work equipment, structures, materials, and processes. "Prevention through Design: Plan for the National Initiative (PtD)" is a statement of goals and strategies and is available online by clicking here.

Recalls Bosch Hammer Drills Due to Electrical Shock Hazard

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has announced a voluntary recall of about 20,000 Bosch hammer drills. The models have a grounding system and trigger switch that could cause ground wire abrasion and/or ground connector failure posing a shock hazard. In addition, the switch trigger could become stuck in the "on" position posing an injury hazard to the user. Affected are the Bosch 1/2 inch 2-Speed Hammer Drill with model number HD19-2, HD19-2D, HD19-2L and HD 21-2. "BOSCH" is printed in red lettering on the side of the drills. The drills were sold at home improvement, hardware and major retailers nationwide and various distributors from Sept. 2009 through Aug. 2010 for between about $140 and $220. To see more on the recall, click here.

drill2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care Issued     
On Oct. 18, the American Heart Association (AHA) and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) released 2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care. To access the guidelines, click here.  You can also see a summary of the major points of the 2010 AHA/ERC Guidelines by clicking here.

Study Says Shiftwork Doubles Injury Risk 
A University of British Columbia (UBC) study has found that night shift workers are almost twice as likely to suffer workplace injuries as people who only work day shifts.  Published in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, the study looked at data on more than 30,000 Canadians, comparing results among workers who did different kinds of shiftwork between 1996 and 2006. The study found that while the overall rate of work injuries across Canada decreased during that 10-year period, the rate of injuries did not decline for night shift workers.


"The disruption of normal sleep patterns due to shiftwork can cause drowsiness or fatigue, which can lead to workplace injuries," says principal examiner Imelda Wong. "Our research shows that people working rotating and night shifts are more likely to experience an injury than those who work regular day hours."


The study found that the risk of work-related injury associated with shiftwork was more pronounced for women than for men, especially women who worked rotating shifts. One reason for the difference may be that women tend to shoulder greater responsibility for childcare and household work and therefore they may have more trouble adjusting to shiftwork and maintaining regular sleep schedules.


To see the UBC Press Release, click here.

OSHA To Hold Hearing on Proposed Rule for Falls In General Industry   OSHA will hold an informal public hearing in Washington, D.C., starting Jan. 18, 2011, on a proposed rule revising the Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment standards to improve worker protection from slip, trip and fall hazards. The proposed rule will prevent annually an estimated 20 workplace fatalities and more than 3,700 injuries that are serious enough to result in lost work days.


The hearing will be held at the Department of Labor's Frances Perkins Building in Washington, D.C. Comments may be submitted online (click here) or by mail or fax by the Nov. 30 deadline. See the Federal Register notice for more information on how to submit comments or a request to attend the hearing.

Reduction in Lost Workday Case Rate Tops Nine Percent  
Results from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses released Nov. 9 show that from 2008 to 2009 there was a nine percent decline in the number of nonfatal occupational illnesses and injuries requiring workers to take days away from work to recuperate. With a total of 1,238,490 cases last year for private industry, and state and local government, BLS reported that the rate of such cases also decreased by five percent, to 117 for every 10,000 full-time workers. Local and state government workers had much higher rates of injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work than workers in private industry. For more on the data, click here.

OSHA Hosts Meeting on Globally Harmonized System of Labeling Chemicals 
OSHA is inviting interested parties to participate in an open, informal public meeting Nov. 30 to discuss proposals in preparation for the 20th session of the United Nations Subcommittee of Experts on the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. The Globally Harmonized System was formally adopted by the United Nations in December 2002. The GHS is a single, harmonized system for classification of chemicals according to their health, physical, and environmental effects. It also provides harmonized communication elements, including labels and safety data sheets.


The public may attend without prior notice a meeting of the U.S. Interagency GHS Coordinating Group hosted by OSHA in the Department of Labor's Frances Perkins Building in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the meeting is to provide interested groups and individuals with an update on GHS-related issues and an opportunity to express their views for consideration in developing U.S. government positions for the upcoming U.N. meeting, which will take place Dec. 7-9 in Geneva, Switzerland. Click here for more information.

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