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Volume 2010/11, Issue 8
 
January 26, 2011
In This Issue
Calaveras River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring
Merced River Conditions
Mokelumne River Woodbridge Dam Fish Ladder Monitoring
San Joaquin Conditions
Delta Exports
events

Tuolumne County Range Water Forum Meeting:

Feb. 15
 
links
 

FISHBIO
 

Hydroacoustic Technology Inc.
 
signup
field notes
Chinook salmon fry
  Photo by FISHBIO.
Key Highlights
January 3 - January 16, 2011

 

Calaveras River Juvenile Migration Monitoring continued during the reporting period, and a total of 37 O. mykiss were captured at Shelton Road (RM 28).

Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring at Oakdale (RM 40) began on January 3, 2011, and a total of 3,132 Chinook salmon and 3 juvenile O. mykiss were captured during the reporting period.

Monitoring at Caswell State Park (RM 8) began on December 14, 2010, and a total of 76 Chinook salmon were captured through January 16, 2011.

Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring continued at Waterford (RM 30), and a total of 598 Chinook salmon fry were captured during the reporting period.

Monitoring at Grayson (RM 5) began on January 6, 2011, and a total of 192 Chinook salmon were captured during the reporting period.

Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring at Vino Farms (RM 54) continued during the reporting period, and a total of 406 Chinook salmon fry and 1 juvenile O. mykiss were captured during the reporting period.

Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring continued during the reporting period, and 3 Chinook salmon and 1 O. mykiss were observed passing through the Vaki Riverwatcher during the reporting period.

Merced River. No monitoring data is available during the reporting period.

Mokelumne River Woodbridge Dam Fish Ladder Monitoring. As of January 16, 2011, a total of 7,191 Chinook passed upstream of the Woodbridge Dam during the 2010-2011 season.

San Joaquin River Conditions. During the reporting period,San Joaquin River flows at Vernalis ranged from 10,879 cfs to 17,213 cfs. Water temperatures in the San Joaquin River ranged from 45.5F to 49.1F at Vernalis and from 46.1F to 49.6F at Mossdale. Average daily dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River fluctuated between 9.0 mg/L and 9.5 mg/L at Mossdale, and between 8.9 mg/L and 9.4 mg/L at Rough 'n Ready.

Delta Exports.Combined total exports (state and federal pumps) fluctuated during the reporting period ranging from 10,386 cfs to 12,660 cfs.


 
2010/11 Calaveras River Juvenile Migration Monitoring

The Calaveras River rotary screw trap at Shelton Road (RM 28) was operated eight days between January 3 and January 16, 2011. A total of 37 O. mykiss were captured during the reporting period, increasing the season total to 500. Daily catches ranged between 0 and 12 individuals (Figure 1). All of the O. mykiss captured were Age 1+ (100-299 mm) and were rated as silvery parr (n=35) or smolt (n=2). Average forklengths and weights of measured O. mykiss are provided in Table 1.


No Chinook salmon were captured during this reporting period.


Instantaneous temperature recorded at the trap ranged from 44.0F to 50.5F, and turbidity ranged from 2.35 NTU to 6.32 NTU. Daily average combined flows from New Hogan Dam (NHG) and Cosgrove Creek (COS) fluctuated between 101 cfs and 216 cfs, and at Bellota (MRS) flows fluctuated between 228 cfs and 579 cfs.

 

Table 1. Biosampling data for O. mykiss captured at Shelton Road between January 3 and January 16, 2011. Parentheses indicate range.
 

Catch Table


 

 Flow and Catch
 

Figure 1. Daily O. mykiss catch at Shelton Road, Calaveras River flow recorded at New Hogan Dam (NHG) and Cosgrove Creek (COS) combined, and flow recorded at Bellota (MRS), between November 1, 2010, and January 16, 2011.


 
2011 Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring

Oakdale Rotary Screw Trap

Figure 2. Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Oakdale.

The Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Oakdale (RM 40) initiated sampling on January 3 and continued through the reporting period (Figure 2). A total of 3,132 juvenile Chinook salmon and 3 juvenile O. mykiss were captured. Daily catch of Chinook salmon ranged between 7 and 1,215 individuals. Average forklengths and weights of Chinook salmon and O. mykiss are provided in Table 2 for the 737 Chinook and 3 O. mykiss that were measured. Most of the measured Chinook were fry (n=728) but a few smolts were also recorded (n=9). The O. mykiss that were capture were rated as silvery parr (n=1) and smolt (n=2).


Table 2. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon and O. mykiss captured and measured at Oakdale between January 3 and January 16, 2011.

Catch Table 

Oakdale Efficiency Experiment

Figure 3. Marking fish for an efficiency experiment conducted for the Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Oakdale.


 

Instantaneous temperature recorded at the trap ranged from 44.4F to 49.8F, and turbidity ranged from 0.45 NTU to 19.74 NTU. Daily average flow at Goodwin Dam (GDW) ranged between 201 cfs and 217 cfs, and flows at Ripon (RIP) decreased from 1,336 cfs and 266 cfs (Figure 4).


 

Three trap efficiency experiments were conducted with naturally spawned juvenile Chinook salmon marked caudal fin green (CFG; Figure 3). Preliminary capture efficiency estimates from these releases were 23.7%, 26.3% and 34.4% at flows of 204 cfs, 205 cfs and 206 cfs, respectively (Table 3).

 

Table 3. Trap efficiency tests conducted at Oakdale between January 3 and January 16, 2011.

Efficiency Data
 Flow and Catch

Figure 4. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Oakdale and Stanislaus River flow recorded by Goodwin Dam (GDW) and Ripon (RIP), 2010.


 

The Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Caswell State Park (RM 8) was installed December 14, 2010 and intermittently sampling  was conducted through the reporting period.  A total of 76 juvenile Chinook salmon have been captured so far this season. Daily catch ranged between 0 and 39 Chinook salmon.


 

No O. mykiss have been captured so far this season.


 

No trap efficiency experiments were conducted during the reporting period.


 

Instantaneous temperature recorded at the trap ranged from 46.0F and 53.4F, and turbidity ranged from 2.23 NTU to 53.20 NTU. Daily average flow at Ripon (RIP) declined from a peak of 1,397 cfs to 235 cfs.


 
2010/11 Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring 

The Tuolumne River rotary screw trap at Waterford (RM 30) operated continuously during the reporting period. A total of 598 juvenile Chinook salmon fry were captured. Daily catch ranged between 13 and 98 Chinook (Figure 5).
Average forklengths and weights of all Chinook salmon are provided in Table 2. Most of the fry were buttoned up (n = 489), although a few sac-fry (n = 16) were also observed.


 

Table 5. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon captured and measured at Waterford between January 3 and January 16, 2011. Parentheses indicate range.

Catch Table  
 

No O. mykiss were captured during this reporting period.


 

Instantaneous temperature taken at the trap ranged from 47.3F to 50.1F, and turbidity ranged from 1.82 NTU to 8.04 NTU. Daily average flow at La Grange (LGN) ranged from 2,150 cfs to 5,350 cfs.


 

One trap efficiency experiment was conducted during the reporting period with naturally spawned juvenile Chinook salmon marked caudal fin orange (CFO). The preliminary estimated capture efficiency was 0.7% at a flow of 2,150 cfs (Table 6).
 


 

Table 6. Trap efficiency tests conducted at Waterford between January 3 and January 16, 2011.

Efficiency Data
 

 Flow and Catch

Figure 5. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Waterford and Tuolumne River flow recorded at La Grange (LGN) and Modesto (MOD) between December 1, 2010, and January 16, 2011.

 

Grayson Rotary Screw Traps

Figure 6. Tuolumne River rotary screw traps at Grayson.


 

The Tuolumne River rotary screw traps at Grayson (RM 5) were installed on January 6, 2011 and operated continuously between January 6 and January 16 (Figure 6). A total of 192 Chinook salmon were captured during the reporting period. Average forklengths and weights of all Chinook salmon are provided in Table 7. Most of the fry were buttoned up (n = 186), although a few sac-fry (n = 6) were also observed. 


 

 

Table 7. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon captured and measured at Grayson between January 6 and January 16, 2011. Parentheses indicate range.

Catch Table 

Instantaneous temperature taken at the trap ranged from 47.8F to 52.3F, and turbidity ranged from 2.50 NTU to 6.09 NTU. Daily average flow at Modesto (MOD) fluctuated during the reporting period, declining from a peak at 7,370 cfs to 2,780 cfs (Figure 7).


 

One trap efficiency experiment was conducted with naturally spawned juvenile Chinook salmon marked caudal fin pink (CFP). The preliminary capture efficiency estimate from the release was 3.5% at a flow of 3,190 cfs (Table 8).


Table 8. Trap efficiency tests conducted at Grayson between January 6 and January 16, 2011.

Efficiency Data
 

 Flow and Catch

Figure 7. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Grayson and Tuolumne River flow recorded at La Grange (LGN) and Modesto (MOD) between January 1 and January 16, 2011.



2010/11 Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
 

The Mokelumne River rotary screw trap at Vino Farms (RM 54) continued intermittent sampling, and a total of 406 juvenile Chinook salmon were captured through the end of the reporting period.

Average daily flow from Camanche Reservoir (CMN) generally decreased from 2,598 cfs to 1,121 cfs (Figure 8). Instantaneous temperature ranged between 48.7F and 51.8F, and instantaneous turbidity ranged between 3.11 NTU and 4.68 NTU.

One juvenile O. mykiss measuring 122 mm was captured on January 8, increasing the season total count to two.

 

Flow and Catch

Figure 8. Daily juvenile Chinook catches at Vino Farms and Mokelumne River flow recorded at Camanche Reservior (CMN), between December 1, 2010, and January 16, 2011.


 
2010/11 Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring 

Between January 3 and January 16 the Vaki Riverwatcher detected three (3) Chinook salmon as they passed upstream of the Stanislaus River Weir increasing the season total to 1,382.


One O. mykiss (400 mm) was detected passing upstream during this reporting period increasing the season total to two O. mykiss (Table 9). Neither of the two O. mykiss

observed this season had adipose fin clip.


 

Daily average flow in the Stanislaus River at Goodwin Dam (GDW; RM 58) fluctuated between 201 cfs and 217 cfs (Figure 9). Flow at Ripon (RIP; RM 15) decreased from 1,336 cfs to 262 cfs. Note: flows downstream of Goodwin Dam may differ from dam releases due to irrigation, precipitation and other factors.


 

Instantaneous water temperature measured at the weir ranged between 46.5˚F and 49.8˚F, and daily average water temperature at Ripon (RPN; RM 15) ranged between 46.4˚F and 51.6˚F (Figure 10). Instantaneous turbidity ranged between 0.94 NTU and 26.20 NTU (Figure 11). Instantaneous dissolved oxygen at the weir ranged between 9.55 mg/L and 10.61 mg/L, and daily average dissolved oxygen at Ripon (RPN; RM 15) ranged from 8.53 mg/L to 10.10 mg/L (Figure 12).


 

Table 9. Net passage counts for all species between January 3 and January 16, 2011 at the Stanislaus River Weir.

Net Passage
Chinook passage and flow

Figure 9. Daily upstream adult Chinook passage at the Stanislaus River weir in relation to daily average flow (cfs) recorded in the Stanislaus River at Goodwin (GDW) and Ripon (RIP), and in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis (VNS) in 2010 and 2011.

 

 

Temperature

Figure 10. Daily upstream adult Chinook passage recorded at the Stanislaus River weir in relation to instantaneous water temperature recorded at the weir, and daily average water temperature recorded in the Stanislaus River at Ripon (RPN), and in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis (VER), Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI) in  2010 and 2011.  

 
turbidity and passage

Figure 11. Daily upstream adult Chinook passage at the Stanislaus River weir in relation to instantaneous turbidity recorded at the weir in 2010 and 2011.


Dissolved Oxygen

Figure 12. Daily upstream adult Chinook passage at the Stanislaus River weir in relation to instantaneous dissolved oxygen recorded at the weir, and daily average dissolved oxygen recorded in the Stanislaus River at Ripon (RPN), and in the San Joaquin River at Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI) in 2010 and 2011.


 
Merced River Conditions 

Flows in the Merced River at Cressy (CRS; RM 52) decreased from 4,013 cfs to 173 cfs during reporting period. Flows at Stevinson (MST; RM 5) also generally decreased, ranging from 4,524 cfs to 1,109 cfs (Figure 13). Water temperatures in the Merced River ranged from 45.7F to 50.2F at Cressy, and from 46.6F to 50.6F at Stevinson (Figure 14).

Flow  

Figure 13. Daily average flows (cfs) recorded in the Merced River at Cressy (CRS) and Stevinson (MST) in 2010 and 2011.

Temperature

Figure 14. Daily average water temperatures (F) recorded in the Merced River at Cressy (CRS) and Stevinson (MST) in 2010 and 2011.


 
Mokelumne River Woodbridge Dam Fish Ladder Monitoring

Fall-run Chinook salmon returning to the Mokelumne River are counted annually by East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) as they ascend the fish ladder at Woodbridge Dam. As of January 16, a total of 7,191 Chinook have passed upstream of the dam this season (Figure 15).

Chinook passage and flow 

Figure 15. Daily upstream adult Chinook passage recorded at the Woodbridge Dam fish ladder in relation to daily average flows (cfs) recorded in the Mokelumne River at Camanche Reservoir (CMN) in 2010 and 2011. Note: Graph does not include fish observed before September 22.


 
San Joaquin Conditions
 

During the reporting period, flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis declined from 17,213 cfs to 10,879 (Figure 16). Most of the variations in flow occurred due to releases from Friant Dam (SJF), which were increased in December for flood control. During the reporting period, flows from Friant Dam were decreased from 6,980 to 1,770. Water temperature in the San Joaquin River ranged from 45.5F to 49.1F at Vernalis, from 46.1F to 49.6F at Mossdale, and from 46.7F to 49.5F at Rough 'n Ready Island (Figure 17). Average daily dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River fluctuated from 8.9 mg/L to 9.4 mg/L in the deep water ship channel (measured at Rough 'n Ready Island), and between 9.0 mg/L and 9.5 mg/L at Mossdale (Figure 18).

Flow 

Figure 16. San Joaquin River flows at Vernalis from January 1, 2010, through January 16, 2011.

Temperature
 

Figure 17. San Joaquin River daily average water temperatures at Vernalis, Mossdale, and Rough 'n Ready from January 1, 2010, through January 16, 2011.

Dissolved Oxygen

Figure 18. San Joaquin daily average dissolved oxygen at Mossdale and Rough 'n Ready, from January 1, 2010, through January 16, 2011.



Delta Exports
 

Mean daily pumping at the
C.W. Jones Pumping Plant (federal pumps previously known as Tracy Pumping Plant) ranged between 4,008 cfs and 4,095 cfs (Figure 19). Mean daily pumping at the Harvey O. Banks Pumping Plant (state pumps) ranged between 6,304 cfs and 8,571 cfs. Combined total exports (state and federal pumps) during this period ranged from 10,386 cfs to 12,660 cfs.
Exports

Figure 19. Daily exports at the state and federal pumping stations from January 1, 2010, through January 16, 2011.