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Volume 2009/10, Issue 8
February 12, 2010
In This Issue
Calaveras River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring
Tuolumne River Weir Monitoring
San Joaquin Conditions
Delta Exports
events

March 18:
TRTAC Meeting

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FISHBIO

 
 
Stream Net

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field notes
Grayson Fry
  Photo by FISHBIO.
 
Key Highlights
 
Calaveras River Migration Monitoring continued during the reporting period and a total of 181 O. mykiss were captured at Shelton Road (RM 28) increasing the season total to 368.

Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring continued during the reporting period. A total of 2,683 Chinook were captured at Vino Farms (RM 54) increasing the season total to 4,669 and 6 Chinook were captured at Golf (RM 38) increasing the season total to 16.
 
Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring continued during the reporting period. A total of 15,633 Chinook salmon were captured at Oakdale (RM 40) increasing the season total to 16,624. Data are not yet available from the rotary srew trap at Caswell State Park (RM 8) for this report period.

Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring continued during the reporting period. A total of 418 Chinook salmon were captured at Waterford (RM 30) increasing the season total to 503. A total of 12 Chinook salmon have been captured at Grayson (RM 5) this season, all during the reporting period.

Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring continued during the reporting period. A total of 9 Chinook salmon were detected as they passed upstream of the Stanislaus River Weir increasing the season total to 1,262.

Tuolumne River Weir Monitoring continued during the reporting period. A total of 3 Chinook salmon were detected as they passed upstream of the Tuolumne River Weir increasing the season total to 283.
 
San Joaquin River Conditions.
San Joaquin River flows at Vernalis increased ranging between 1,465 cfs and 4,494 cfs. Water temperatures in the San Joaquin River ranged between 47.7F and 52.6F and average daily dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged between 8.7 mg/L and 9.7 mg/L.

Delta Exports. Combined total exports (state and federal pumps) fluctuated during the reporting period ranging between 2,413 cfs and 8,680 cfs.

We encourage subscribers to contribute any relevant information for future issues of the newsletter (e.g., additional monitoring studies, announcements of upcoming meetings and events, etc). If you would like to contribute, please contact Chrissy Sonke.
 


2009/10 Calaveras River Juvenile Migration Monitoring

The Calaveras River rotary screw trap at Shelton Road (RM 28) sampled eight days between January 18 and January 31. A total of 181 O. mykiss were captured during the reporting period increasing the season total to 368. Daily catch ranged between zero and 89 O. mykiss (Figure 1). Most of the O. mykiss captured, (n=153) were Age 1+ (100-299 mm) and were rated as parr (n=19), silvery parr (n=120), and smolt (n=16). Two YOY were also captured. Average forklengths and weights of O. mykiss are provided in Table 1.

Catches were highest immediately following a run-off event that resulted in flows of 1,239 cfs at Bellota, and catches may have been higher during the freshet when high flows precluded sampling.

No Chinook salmon have been captured this season.
 
Instantaneous temperatures recorded at the trap ranged from 48.0F to 49.5F (Figure 2), and turbidity ranged from 0.66 NTU to 13.80 NTU. Daily average flow fluctuated between 29 cfs and 54 cfs at New Hogan Dam (NHG), between 14 cfs and 542 cfs at Cosgrove Creek (COS) and between 0 and 1,239 cfs at Bellota (MRS).

Table 1. Biosampling data for O. mykiss captured at Shelton Road between January 18 and January 31, 2010. Parentheses indicate range.
 
Calaveras Biosample
 

 
Flow and Catch


Figure 1. Daily O. mykiss catch at Shelton Road and Calaveras River flow recorded by New Hogan Dam (NHG) and Cosgrove Creek (COS) combined, between November 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010.
 

 
 Temp and Catch

Figure 2. Daily O. mykiss catch at Shelton Road and Calaveras River temperature recorded instantaneously at trap location between November 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010.

 
2009/10 Mokelumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring
 
The Mokelumne River rotary screw traps at Vino Farms (RM 54) continued to sample intermittently between January 18 and January 31 and a total of 2,683 Chinook salmon were captured increasing the season total to 4,669.

Average daily flows from Camanche Reservoir (CMN) were stable between 330 cfs and 332 cfs (Figure 3). Instantaneous temperature ranged between 48.6F and 50.5F and instantaneous turbidity ranged between 1.73 NTU and 5.65 NTU.
 
No O. mykiss were captured at Vino Farms during the report period. One O. mykiss has been captured so far this season.
 

Flow and Catch

Figure 3. Daily Chinook catches at Vino Farms and Mokelumne River flow recorded by Camanche Reservior (CMN), between December 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010.

The Mokelumne River rotary screw trap at Golf (RM 38) continued to sample intermittently between January 18 and January 31 and a total of 6 Chinook salmon were captured increasing the season total to 16.
 
Average daily flows recorded at Woodbridge (WBR) ranged between 251 cfs and 292 cfs (Figure 4). Instantaneous temperature ranged between 48.7F and 50.5F and instantaneous turbidity ranged between 2.70 NTU and 4.84 NTU.
 
One O. mykiss (forklength 380 mm) was captured at Golf during this reporting period.


Flow and Catch


Figure 4. Daily Chinook catches at Golf and Mokelumne River flow recorded at Woodbridge (WBR), between December 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010.


2010 Stanislaus River Juvenile Migration Monitoring

The Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Oakdale (RM 40) sampled continuously between January 18 and January 31. A total of 15,633 juvenile Chinook salmon were captured during the reporting period increasing the season total to 16,624. Daily catch ranged between 9 and 7,122 Chinook salmon. Average forklengths and weights of Chinook salmon are provided in Table 2 for 811 fish that were measured. Most of the measured Chinook were fry (n=744) but there were also some parr (n=12) and smolts (n=55), including 50 larger fish (i.e., > 100 mm).

Table 2. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon and O. mykiss captured and measured at Oakdale between January 18 and January 31, 2010.
 
Oakdale Biosample
 
Instantaneous temperature recorded at the trap ranged from 46.9F to 50.3F, and turbidity ranged from 0.67 NTU to 38.60 NTU. Daily average flow at Goodwin Dam (GDW) ranged between 202 cfs and 220 cfs, and flows at Ripon (RIP) ranged between 235 cfs and 537 cfs (Figure 5).

Two trap efficiency experiments were conducted with naturally spawned juvenile Chinook salmon marked caudal fin green (CFG). Preliminary capture efficiency estimates from these releases were 22.3% and 32.2% at flows of 215 cfs and 204 cfs, respectively (Table 3).

Table 3. Trap efficiency tests conducted at Oakdale between January 18 and January 31, 2010.
 
Oakdale TE

Flow and Catch

Figure 5. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Oakdale and Stanislaus River flow recorded by Goodwin Dam (GDW) and Ripon (RIP), 2010.

Data are not yet available from operation of the Stanislaus River rotary screw trap at Caswell State Park (RM 8) during January 18 through January 31.



2010 Tuolumne River Juvenile Migration Monitoring

The Tuolumne River rotary screw trap at Waterford (RM 30) operated continuously between January 18 through January 31. A total of 418 juvenile Chinook salmon were captured during the reporting period increasing the season total to 503. Daily catch ranged between zero and 128 Chinook salmon (Figure 6). Average forklengths and weights of Chinook salmon are provided in Table 4 for 326 fish that were measured. Most of the measured fish were fry (n=360) but there were also parr (n=1) and smolt (n=5).

No O. mykiss were captured during this reporting period.

Table 4. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon captured and measured at Waterford between January 18 and January 31, 2010. Parentheses indicate range.
 
Waterford Biosample

Instantaneous temperature taken at the trap ranged from 46.0F to 53.0F, and turbidity ranged from 0.19 NTU to 33.30 NTU. Daily average flow records from La Grange (LGN) are not complete for the reporting period but flows were estimated to be stable around 225 cfs.

Two trap efficiency experiments were conducted using naturally spawned juvenile Chinook salmon marked caudal fin orange (CFO). Preliminary capture efficiency estimates from these releases were 20.0% and 11.0% at estimated flows of 225 cfs (Table 5).


Table 5. Trap efficiency tests conducted at Waterford between January 18 and January 31, 2010. Asterisk denotes estimated flow.
 
 Waterford TE

Flow and Catch

Figure 6. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Waterford and Tuolumne River flow recorded by La Grange (LGN) and Modesto (MOD), 2010.

Grayson RSTThe Tuolumne River rotary screw trap at Grayson (RM 5) continued sampling during the reporting period (Figure 7). A total of 12 Chinook salmon were captured and daily catch ranged between zero and four Chinook salmon (Figure 8). Average forklengths and weights of Chinook salmon are provided in Table 6 for all 12 fish that were measured. Most of the measured fish were fry (n=10) but there were some smolt (n=2).

No O. mykiss captured yet this season.

 
Trap efficiency releases have not yet been conducted this season.

Instantaneous temperature taken at the trap ranged from 48.3F to 54.8F, and turbidity ranged from 0.53 NTU to 5.82 NTU. Daily average flow at Modesto (MOD) increased during the reporting period ranging between 223 cfs and 1,023 cfs due to high runoff events.

Table 6. Biosampling data for Chinook salmon captured and measured at Grayson between January 18 and January 31, 2010. Parentheses indicate range.
 

Grayson Biosample
Flow and Catch

Figure 8. Daily Chinook salmon catch at Grayson and Tuolumne River flow at La Grange (LGN) and Modesto (MOD), 2010.

 
2009/10 Stanislaus River Weir Monitoring 
 
STB-RBTChinookBetween January 18 and January 31 a total of nine Chinook salmon were detected as they passed upstream of the Stanislaus River Weir increasing the season total to 1,262 (Figure 12). Daily passage ranged between zero and three Chinook salmon. On January 19, turbidity exceeded 3.0 NTU thus hindering the ability to properly identify species with the vaki system. Trapping was conducted January 19 through January 27 due to high turbidity (eg. >3 NTU) which precluded identification to species using the vaki system (Figure 9). 
 
One male O. mykiss (forklength 390 mm) was captured during trapping on January 22 and was passed upstream (Figure 10).  Net upstream count is now at six O. mykiss this season.
 
During the reporting period, nine striped bass were passed downstream on January 19 and 23. Turbidity spiked to 74.9 NTU and 42.8 NTU on these dates as a result of storm runoff (Figure 11). 
 
 
Table 7. Annual Chinook passage at the Stanislaus River Weir 2003-2009. Asterisk denotes extended no sample period. The weir was not sampled from January 10 to March 23, 2009.
 Weir Passage


 
Stan Cumm

Figure 12. Cumulative Chinook salmon upstream passage recorded at the Stanislaus River Weir, 2003 to 2009.

Daily average flow in the Stanislaus River at Goodwin Dam (GDW; RM 58) fluctuated between 202 cfs and 220 cfs. Flows at Ripon (RIP; RM 15) ranged between 235 cfs and 537 cfs (Figure 13). Note: flows downstream of Goodwin Dam may be higher than dam releases due to irrigation returns and other factors.
 
Instantaneous water temperatures measured at the weir fluctuated during the reporting period ranging between 46.5˚F and 52.7˚F and daily average water temperatures at Ripon (RPN; RM 15) ranged between 49.0˚F and 53.9˚F (Figure 14). Instantaneous turbidity ranged between 2.00 NTU and 42.80 NTU (Figure 15). Instantaneous dissolved oxygen ranged between 10.20 mg/L and 11.35 mg/L and daily average dissolved oxygen at Ripon (RPN; RM 15) ranged between 9.1 mg/L and 10.1 mg/L (Figure 16).


Flow

Figure 13. Daily upstream Chinook passage recorded at the Stanislaus River Weir in relation to daily average flows (cfs) recorded in the Stanislaus River at Goodwin (GDW) and Ripon (RIP) and in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis (VNS), 2009/10.

Temp 

Figure 14. Daily upstream Chinook passage recorded at the Stanislaus River Weir in relation to instantaneous water temperature recorded at the weir and daily average water temperature recorded in the Stanislaus River at Ripon (RPN) and in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis (VER), Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI), 2009/10.

 

 Turb and Catch

Figure 15. Daily upstream Chinook passage recorded at the Stanislaus River Weir and instantaneous turbidity recorded at the weir, 2009/10.

 D.O.

 
Figure 16. Daily upstream Chinook passage recorded at the Stanislaus River Weir and instantaneous dissolved oxygen recorded at the weir and daily average dissolved oxygen recorded in the Stanislaus River at Ripon (RPN) and in the San Joaquin River at Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI), 2009/10.

 
2009/10 Tuolumne River Weir Monitoring
 
Between January 18 and January 31 a total of 3 Chinook salmon were detected as they passed upstream of the Tuolumne River Weir increasing the season total to 283. Daily passage ranged between zero and two Chinook. 
 
Daily average flow records from the Tuolumne River at La Grange (LGN; RM 51.8) are incomplete for the reporting period but it is estimated that flows were stable around 225 cfs. Flow at Modesto (MOD; RM 17) fluctuated during the reporting period between 223 cfs and 1,023 cfs (Figure 17). Note: flows at Modesto may be higher than La Grange due to accretion and Dry Creek inflow. Instantaneous water temperatures measured at the weir ranged between 48.3˚F and 55.2˚F and daily average water temperatures at Modesto (MOD; RM 17) are complete for only three of the 14 days during the reporting period and ranged between 50.3˚F and 52.0˚F (Figure 18). Instantaneous turbidity ranged between 0.23 NTU and 25.20 NTU (Figure 19), and instantaneous dissolved oxygen ranged between 9.06 mg/L and 10.42 mg/L (Figure 20).



Flow
 
Figure 17. Daily upstream Chinook passage at the Tuolumne River Weir and daily average flows (cfs) recorded in the Tuolumne River at La Grange (LGN) and Modesto (MOD) and in the San Joaquin River at Maze Rd. Bridge (MRB) and Vernalis (VNS), 2009/10.

Temp

Figure 18. Daily upstream Chinook passage at the Tuolumne River Weir and instantaneous water temperature recorded at the weir and daily average water temperature recorded in the Tuolumne River at Modesto (MOD) and in the San Joaquin River at Maze Rd. Bridge (MRB), Vernalis (VER), Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI), 2009/10.

Turb 

 
Figure 19. Daily upstream Chinook passage at the Tuolumne River Weir and instantaneous turbidity recorded at the weir, 2009/10.


D.O.

Figure 20. Daily upstream Chinook passage at the Tuolumne River Weir and instantaneous dissolved oxygen recorded at the weir and daily average dissolved oxygen recorded in the San Joaquin River at Mossdale (MSD) and Rough & Ready (RRI), 2009/10.




 
San Joaquin Conditions
 
Between January 18 and January 31, flows in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis sharply increased from 1,465 cfs to 4,494 cfs starting on January 19 due to storm runoff and fell to 2,061 cfs by January 31 (Figure 21). Water temperatures in the San Joaquin River fluctuated between 47.7F and 52.6F at Vernalis; between 48.2F and 52.7F at Mossdale; and between 48.8F and 50.5F at Rough 'n Ready Island (Figure 22). Average daily dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River exhibited an overall decrease ranging between 8.0 mg/L and 9.8 mg/L in the deep water ship channel (measured at Rough 'n Ready Island) and fluctuated between 8.7 mg/L and 9.7 mg/L at Mossdale (Figure 23).


Flow 

Figure 21. San Joaquin River flow at Vernalis, January 1, 2009 through January 31, 2010.


Temp 

 

Figure 22. San Joaquin River daily average water temperature at Vernalis, Mossdale, and Rough 'n Ready, January 1, 2009 through January 31, 2010.
 

D.O.
 
 
Figure 23. San Joaquin daily average dissolved oxygen at Mossdale and Rough 'n Ready, January 1, 2009 through January 31, 2010.

 
Delta Exports 
 
Combined total exports (state and federal pumps) generally increased from 5,947 cfs on January 19 to 8,680 cfs on January 30, then dropped to approximately 7,000 cfs on January 31. Mean daily pumping at the Harvey O. Banks Pumping Plant (state pumps) ranged from 582 cfs and 5,353 cfs. Mean daily pumping at the C.W. Jones Pumping Plant (federal pumps previously known as Tracy Pumping Plant) ranged from 1,007 cfs to 3,329 cfs during the reporting period (Figure 24).


 Exports


Figure 24. Daily exports at the Federal and State pumping stations, January 1, 2009 through January 31, 2010.

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