Chuck Green's Design Likes
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There is good news designers: The number of those with heightened appreciation of design far exceeds the number of those who master producing it.

You can literally see our profession change week to week. I hope, in some small way, these links contribute to your excitement about the evolution of design.
 
Be well, Chuck
 
P.S. Don't forget to checkout my design template collections--ideabooks and 300-plus templates on a dual format (Mac/PC) CD-ROM...

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When design is art
I love this free-form typographic illustration by the design team at Atelier Martino&Jaņa.

Here > Poster series for Guimarães JAZZ 2009...

Here > The designer's web--Atelier Martino&Jaņa...

Here > An interview with the AM&J team..

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How to create an multipurpose logo

My friend Sabu George points us to an interesting example of how a logo concept can be used for multiple purposes.

This is an extreme example, but it might help you conjure up ideas about how to make your next logo design perform more than one trick.

Here > An adaptable identity...

Here > The old logo...

Here > An article about the makeover by its designers...

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I am a sucker for script

I'm a sucker for script typefaces. In the event you missed it, a few years ago the Greek foundry Parachute launched an interpretation of the work of sixteenth-century calligrapher Joseph Champion. It looks like a labor of love.

Here > The making of Champion Script Pro from Parachute's Upscale Typography blog...

Here > The Champion Script Pro specimen booklet (650KB PDF)...

Here > The Champion Script Pro Guide (500KB PDF)...

Here > The MyFonts page...

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Recent Tweets

MyFonts interview with Laura Worthington http://ht.ly/2vhfK

Think the future of design is bleak? You're missing its growing importance. Best Buy names Chief Design Officer http://ht.ly/2u0oP

Lots of interesting UI details on the msnbc.com makeover. Like how color tints bleed into top of text area http://ht.ly/2sRhC

NEW: 88 of the world's best illustrators http://www.jumpola.com/#illus (see Practice > Illustrators)

The class of 2014: No need for a wristwatch... A must read for marketers and designers: the Mindset List http://ht.ly/2qOYK

Follow general design issues at http://www.twitter.com/ideabook

Follow InDesign-specific issues at http://www.twitter.com/indesignstorm




The history of trade show exhibit design
I'm guessing most graphic designers have been asked, at one time or another, to design a trade show exhibit--a banner, a "booth," or an entire exhibit space. Crafting a message and design for a large-scale application presents a variety of interesting challenges. Before I show you the state of the art (the next post), here's a brief history of exhibit designs provided by exhibitoronline.com.

Here > The International Business Machines exhibit at the 1925 National Hotel Exposition...

Here > A pitchman from a 1954 exhibit...

Here > PC Expo--1982...

Here > The Trade Show History index...

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From the Ideabook.com Design Store




The graphic designer's greatest challenge: no barriers

In twenty-five years we've gone from clunky slide projectors to graceful walls of high resolution LED video blocks. Twenty years ago the limitations of media (I believe) made our job as designers far easier.

I show you this new technology because it is yet another barrier removed. With each barrier removed, the creative focus sharpens another click. You'll need a more creative strategy, a better idea, and an innovative style to distinguish your client from their competition.

The future of graphic design is, at once, challenging, exciting, and unpredictable.

Here > An introduction to Microtiles...

Here > The manufacturer even provides a system for calculating the number of tiles you need for a particular design...

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Tradigital thinking in graphic design

The term "tradigital" art refers to art that is created by combining traditional and digital media. Jim Leggitt's presentation (below) shows you how he employs conventional drawing techniques to produce textured, warm, and visually interesting architectural drawings using digital renderings from, in the case of this class, the SketchUp 3D program.

I show this to you because it provides two important reminders for the graphic designer. First, is that we should continually try to find ways to humanize our work. The more we use digital tools, the more we need to sketch and visualize and brainstorm. The world is not a perfect place and making everything pixel-perfect is not believable.

And second, as a practical matter, it is often preferable to present a client with a sketch-like idea versus a nailed-down solution. A sketch allows you the freedom to refine the solution as you get into the detail of it.

Here > Jim Leggitt on Traditional Imaging...

Here > Tradigital imaging allows you to turn a finished image into a work in progress...

Here > About Jim Leggitt...

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The arch in graphic design
 
The arch is a beautiful thing. To me, the symmetry of it projects a sense of strength and grace. Watch how Jesse Bennett-Chamberlain uses arches in his latest design for Steinway.

Here > The arch on the home page is mirrored throughout. I like how it projects the logo as the center of interest...

Here > Another effective use of an arch...

Here > One more...

Here > BTW, love his 404 error page...

Here > The arch in architecture...

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About the briefing

I try to remain as objective as possible about the information I share here. Unless otherwise stated, I receive no compensation from the organizations and people mentioned except for occasional product samples. Comments? Suggestions? Write me at [email protected]

Chuck Green