Diversity in Action...        Univ Seal

An online newsletter from the Office of Diversity at Chico State.

Issue 3
November 2, 2010
Students at CSU, Chico.
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ACLU, Chico

Chico Peace & Justice Center

Paradise Center for Nonviolence

Stonewall Alliance

SAVE THE DATE FOR UPCOMING EVENTS!
NOV. 8: Up 'Til Dawn in Acker Gym begins at 3 p.m.

NOV. 9:
University Film Series: Fox and His Friends in Ayres 106
at 7:30 p.m.

NOV. 10:
S.T.O.P.: Film Series: Stolen Childhoods in Holt 170
at 7 p.m.

NOV. 11: Veteran's Day Panel Discussion "Peace in the Military: 1940-2010" at the Chico Peace and Justice Center

NOV. 16:
University Film Series: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring in Ayres 106
at 7:30 p.m.

NOV. 17: Conversations on Diversity in the BMU from 12-1 p.m.

NOV. 30: Tim Wise comes to campus as a guest speaker!
NEXT ISSUE
World AIDS Day, 2010

Update on the Diversity Action Plan
The Office of Diversity at Chico State is providing a welcoming environment where students, faculty and staff are included in campus events and activities to ensure their success.  Together we can foster a climate that acknowledges and celebrates the differences that define who we are.

Sincerely,
Travon Robinson
CSU, Chico Office of Diversity
Kendall Hall 110
530.898.4764

CELEBRATING NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH
Native American Heritage Month

Throughout the United States there are many citizens who can trace their heritage back to the Native Americans of our country. Before colonial rule Native Americans thrived on the land we now live on.

 

As February is dedicated to Black History Month, November is dedicated to honoring those with Native American heritage. "National American Indian Heritage Month," also known as "Native American Heritage Month," is designated for this purpose.

 

Native American Heritage Month began as an effort to gain one day of recognition for the "first Americans" and the many things they had contributed to the United States.

 

Seneca Indian Dr. Arthur C. Parker worked as director at the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Rochester, N.Y.  While in New York and withthe help of the Boy Scouts of America, he attempted to have the nation recognize an official day honoring the "first Americans" and the key roles they played in our country's development.

 

On September 28, 1915, the president of the American Indian Association, Rev. Sherman Coolidge, an Arapahoe Indian, proclaimed the second Saturday of each May to be observed as American Indian Day. This proclamation also included an appeal, which was the first of its kind, for Indians to be recognized as American citizens. In 1916 the Governor of New York declared the second Saturday of May to be American Indian Day.

 

It was not until 1990 that President George H.W. Bush approved the month of November to be National American Heritage Month.

 

One of the important things that Native American culture has given to the United States would be the Navajo language. During World War II the U.S. Government was looking for a code that enemies would not be able to break.

 

Because Navajo was only spoken in the southwest region of the United States, had different dialects and no written alphabet, along with its distinctive tonal qualities, it was a perfect "code." Marine units of the military were able to use this code without it ever being broken.

 

This is only one of the many important things Native Americans have contributed to our country. To learn more about Native American Heritage Month, click HERE!

AIDS MEMORIAL QUILT AT CHICO STATE MAKES A PROFOUND IMPACT!
AIDS Quilt
Thank you to every single person who played a key role in the AIDS Memorial Quilt visit to Chico State.  Thank you for your contribution to end HIV/AIDS.  Your efforts contributed to making an incredible experience bringing awareness to over 1,000 members of our campus community who visited the quilts!

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

 

The Office of Diversity at Chico State would like to thank you for your attention to issues involving the community. If you have any questions, would like to read a particular topic in a newsletter, or would like to comment on past newsletters, please e-mail us at diversityoffice@csuchico.edu.  Thank you and we look

forward to your comments!

This publication is produced by Rachel Gendron on behalf of the
Office of Diversity at Chico State.