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In This Issue
Coconino Community College President Optimistic - Despite Tough Economic
Coconino Community College Celebrates Its 20th Anniversary - Local Dignitaries Attend
CCC Awarded Substantial GED and Caregivers Grant
Foundation Annual Meeting, Alumni and Awards Breakfast a Huge Success
CCC's Newly Elected Foundation Board Members Take The Helm
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MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

Join Our Mailing List

 September 2011 


Coconino Community College President Optimistic - Despite Tough Economic Times 

 

   

Dr. Bornstein addressing the crowd at the  State of the College

 

Coconino Community College (CCC) President Leah L. Bornstein said she is confident about the state of the institution, which has been offering courses in the county for 20 years, and she added there are still tough times ahead.

 

At a recent presentation of the State of the College, Bornstein noted several optimistic themes. "Enrollment is up three percent over the last year.  Currently the college is serving nearly 10,000 students, and has embraced more than 65,000 learners in the past 20 years. There's a lot to celebrate," she said.

 

Every three years, CCC creates a new/revised strategic plan led by the President and approved by the District Governing Board (DGB).  They utilize the following principles to create the plan:

 

    Dynamic

 

    Iterative

 

    Inclusive

 

    Flexible

 

    Creative

 

    Effective

 

"In our strategic planning we will assist in shaping the future of the College through a series of strategic goals, objectives, tactics and measures.  All of these are predicated on thoughtful analysis and continuous improvement.  CCC leaders continually ask, how will this affect learners in a positive manner and promote learning at CCC as decisions are made and the plan implemented. We are looking forward to creating the 2012-2015 plan," Bornstein stated.

 

Jami Van Ess, Vice President of Business and Administrative Services, reviewed CCC's budget outlining the major revenue sources which are state appropriations, tuition and fees, and property taxes. The College is significantly challenged by the current economic climate.

 

In fiscal year (FY) 1999, 44.4 percent of CCC's revenue came from the state.  

 

In FY 2010, 19.9 percent was from state appropriations, 37.8 percent from tuition and fees and 41.2 percent from property taxes.

 

In FY 2011, 16.5 percent was from state appropriations, 43.6 percent from tuition and fees, and 39.7 percent from property taxes.

 

Projected FY 2012 state revenue is only 11 percent. Bornstein and Van Ess acknowledge there's a very real possibility of continued declining state funding in the future.  "We have a difficult task ahead of us, but we are optimistic and resilient," she said.

 

"This is the first time tuition is the largest source of revenue for the College, yet we're still making education an affordable option over many four-year institutions," Van Ess stated.

      

Currently, CCC's property tax funding is significantly lower than any community college district in the state.  Property taxes have been severely limited since 1991 when the college was established.

 

CCC has taken numerous steps to deal with its loss of state funding.  The institution has cut more than $1.5 million from its budget and continues to implement cost savings initiatives through its Sustainable Financial Plan.  CCC is committed to keeping its expenses down, cutting costs and maintaining the quality of education and finding new revenue sources.  

 

While the 2011-2012 year will prove extraordinarily focused on the upcoming Higher Learning Commission accreditation visit, developing the 2012-2015 strategic plan, possible legislation regarding CCC's property tax rate, and celebrating its 20th anniversary, Bornstein remains positive. "We are the community and the community is us.  We all have much in which to be proud," she said.

 


Coconino Community College Celebrates Its
20th Anniversary -  
Local Dignitaries Attend

  

20th anniversry
Coconino County Board of Supervisors Chairwoman Lena Fowler Presents a Proclamation to Patrick Hurley, District Governing Board Chairman on behalf of CCC.


Coconino Community College (CCC) recently celebrated its 20th anniversary of offering certificates and degrees to more than 65,000 learners since the College opened its doors in 1991.   

 

CCC President Leah L. Bornstein said CCC continues to work diligently offering classes to a diverse group of students.   

"Any anniversary is exciting.  However, we have a lot to be proud of after 20 years.  There really are no words to express how proud I am to work with our CCC team," she said.

 

The College began with 400 students in 1991 and two years later three students graduated. One them is Jeff Bierer who received a degree in fire science.  Recently, he served in the war in Iraq, and is currently a Captain in the Flagstaff Fire Department. 

 
CCC District Governing Board Chairman Patrick Hurley said, "CCC offers innovative programs. We should all be proud of our accomplishments."  CCC Foundation Board of Directors President Kevin Stephens, Flagstaff Mayor Sara Presler and Northern Arizona University President John Haeger also attended.

 
"The partnership between CCC and NAU has never been stronger. Both institutions have the same goal. We know it's critical to have more people with higher level degrees.  Many of your students want to move on to a 4-year institution," said Haeger.


Coconino County Board of Supervisors Chairwoman Lena Fowler, presented a plaque acknowledging September 9, 2011 to be proclaimed as Coconino Community College Day.  Fowler said she encourages all County residents, throughout the year, to participate in CCC events to congratulate the school.


The celebration continued with Dr. Bornstein unveiling a timeline depicting special events during the College's 20 year career.  During the CCC Spring 2011 commencement, 300 students graduated from the College.  

 CCC Awarded Substantial GED and Caregivers Grant

 

The Arizona Department of Education awarded Coconino Community College (CCC) an $80,000 federal grant to improve basic literacy skills, earn a GED, and obtain a Caregivers' Certificate.  

 

CCC is one of four colleges in the state to secure the two year Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (IBEST) grant.  At least 160 students are expected to benefit.

   

"The College is extremely excited to provide this level of training and work with students, who otherwise, might not be able to succeed in college level course work.   We hope they will continue their education," said John Cardani, CCC's Executive Director of Community and Corporate Learning Division.


The initiative is a collaboration between the College's  Community and Corporate Learning Division, CCC's Nursing Department, Goodwill Industries of Northern Arizona, regional one-stop Career Centers and the Coconino County Career Center.


Instructors will provide training in career exploration, job skill development, resume writing, interviewing strategies, filling out job applications, and building computer skills. Students also will work on reading, math, writing and GED completion.


Caregiver training will be offered for a minimum of 55 hours for those people who want to earn Caregiver Certification. Classes will focus on caregiving, medications, nutrition, and professionalism. An essential component of the Caregiver Program will include clinical and work experience.

 
"Caregiving is a rewarding and challenging field.  The College's Caregiver Program trains students in nursing homes and in-home care," Don Johnson, CCC Nursing Program Director said.


"This enterprise supports CCC's mission to offer northern Arizona residents the tools they need to succeed in life," said Ingrid Lee, CCC Dean of Arts and Sciences. "We encourage our students to receive the training they need to advance professionally and personally. The students come out with a bundle of skills that give them practical applications as a caregiver. The Caregiver Program will help people earn their GED and have an employable skill set," she added.


Additional training as a Certified Nursing Assistant and a Registered Nurse are a possible career path. Students begin the program in early October of 2011.

  

Foundation Annual Meeting, Alumni and Awards Breakfast a Huge Success

 

 

Annual Meeting
Chief Technology Officer for CCC Joe Traino, Chairman of the Board for CampusWorks Inc. Eric Schoenberg, and Foundation Board President Kevin Stephens share a snapshot as Eric accepts the Campus Works, Inc. plaque at the Annual Meeting September 16th. Campus Works, Inc. was the presenting sponsor at this years meeting.

The Coconino Community College Commons was packed Friday with community leaders, donors, scholarship recipients and CCC staff, faculty District Governing Board and Foundation Board Members at the Foundation Annual Meeting, Alumni and Awards Breakfast.

 

Dr. Leah L. Bornstein opened the meeting welcoming the breakfast attendees. Past President Chris Bavasi thanked the many volunteers, donors and staff members he had worked with during his tenure before turning the meeting over to newly elected Foundation President Kevin Stephens addressed the audience for the first time as President of the Foundation telling his moving introductory story.

 

Alumni Speaker, former Phi Theta Kappa President and President's Medallion Award winner Cynthia Pardo returned to CCC to talk about her years as a student, and how her experience helped her succeed after CCC. Cynthia went on to earn her bachelor's degree at NAU and is employed by the City of Flagstaff, and active as a volunteer in the community.

 

 Scholarship recipients Daniel Timmerman, Maria Cool and Chelsea Brumbaugh stole the show as they told their inspirational stories and thanked the people and organizations for the scholarships they received.

 

After donors, event sponsors, and scholarship recipients received their awards, Foundation board member Susan Casebeer welcomed Joseph and Janice Donaldson to the Plateau Society for their planned gift commitment.

 

New Director of Institutional Advancement Scott Talboom who also addressed the audience for the first time said after the event, "I was amazed at the turnout we had at the breakfast. The groundwork that has been laid for this event by my predecessors Bob Erb, Past President Chris Bavasi, the Foundation Board and the staff has really made the breakfast one of the signature events at the College. I was really impressed by the number of staff and faculty in attendance and pleased that we had representation from all of our campuses. I also want to thank all of the District Governing Board Members and Foundation Board Members for supporting the Foundation by attending the event, and the hard working staff and volunteers that made the event a success."

 

The event was sponsored by CampusWorks Inc., Flagstaff Medical Center, Mangum, Wall Stoops and Warden, Autus Asset Management, Northern Arizona Center for Emerging Technologies, and Nestle Purina. The breakfast was catered by Wildflower Bread Company.   

CCC's Newly Elected
 Foundation Board Members
Take The Helm 

 

 

    

Kevin  StephensCCC's Foundation Board has some new faces. Kevin Stephens (pictured) has been named the new President, Joseph Donaldson the new Vice President, Mike Anderson the new Secretary and Andy Phillips Treasurer.

 

Other new faces to the Foundation Board include  Karla Phillips as the Faculty Representative as well as Student Representatives Cathleen Goodell and Kelly Miller. 

The Anatomy of a Great Professor
CCC's Tom Lehman Receives Medallion

 

Coconino Community College long-time instructor Tom Lehman was awarded the President's Medallion at a Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) annual conference in May.

Tom_lehmanHAPS is an academic society of more than 1,600 high school and college educators, authors and researchers in the fields of anatomy and physiology. At the conference, group members created an environment of sharing, learning, and discussed ways to teach students these difficult subjects.

 

Each year the president of HAPS selects one individual who has shown exemplary service to HAPS and nominates that person to the HAPS Governing Board. This year, CCC's Lehman was rightfully acknowledged for his efforts in this field of teaching. Lehman has been a member of HAPS since 1999 and has served as the Chair of the Steering Committee since 2004.

 

 "It is always a high point of my year to spend a week with 500 close friends at the annual conference, sharing ideas and stories and experiences. I am proud of the work that our Steering Committee has achieved, and I am honored at receiving the President's Medallion in 2011," Lehman said.

 

CCC staff and students may have heard of Lehman before. In 2009, he was honored as the CCC Faculty of the Year.  Great job Mr. Lehman!

 


Coconino Community College Touted As Top Military-Friendly College

 

 

Coconino Community College (CCC) is being honored as one of the top military-friendly schools in the nation.

 

G.I. Jobs, a veteran-owned magazine, released its list of the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools that recruit and nurture veterans.  Among other research, G.I. Jobs assimilated a survey of student veterans. These comments give prospective military students insight into the student veteran experience at that particular college, based on peer reviews, and can be viewed on the web site. The magazine also reviews the benefits offered to military spouses (http://www.militaryfriendlyschools.com).   

 

Approximately 8,000 schools were surveyed, and more than 1,500 made the list. CCC President Leah L. Bornstein said, "We're pleased to be selected as a recipient this year.  It's truly an honor to be identified as a college which embraces our military personnel. We have a strong commitment to our more than 100 veterans on campus."

 

With the passage of the Post 9/11 GI Bill, veterans can enroll in any school provided the students are academically approved.

    

John Long, a former corporal in the U.S. Marine Corps. has been attending CCC for two years.  He earned an Associate's Degree in Psychology, and plans to complete another degree in Applied Science.  Long, who used to build missile launchers, said it's now time for him to jump on to a new career path.

     

Long said CCC staff helped lead him at a time when he needed academic guidance.  "I moved to Flagstaff to go to CCC.   I've had great teachers and they were very helpful.  Since CCC is smaller than many community colleges, I became familiar with things you don't learn about in a larger institution," he said.  "I've received a lot of one-on-one instruction". 

Hi-Line Vending of Flagstaff Donates More than $4,000 to CCC

 

  

Hi-Line_Scheid_Talboom

Hi-Line Vending of Flagstaff, recently donated more than $4,000 to Coconino Community College's Foundation.  

 

Included in photo is: Don Scheid of Hi-Line Vending, and Scott Talboom, Director of Institutional Advancement at CCC.  

 

CCC appreciates the long-standing relationship between Hi-Line and the College

    

Telescope Finally Meets Its New Home       

telescope 1
Coconino Community College (CCC) placed the high-quality, two mirror telescope in the newly-constructed telescope building. The U.S. Naval Observatory donated the professional-level telescope to CCC in 2009.

 District Governing Board Member, Nat White, who was instrumental in obtaining the telescope for the College, was an astronomer at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff for many years. He said he hopes CCC students who use the telescope will become more interested in math and science.

    


Grand Opportunities for Student Interns in National Park

By Megan Kohli, Park Ranger & Environmental Educator  for Grand Canyon National Parks 

 

Coconino Community College student Bobbi Cooley drives through the towering pine forest with a van full of high school youth behind her. The youth pile out of the van and surround her with enthusiasm. They are about to embark on a 12-day adventure, and they can't wait for it to start. Cooley gets them started setting up camp. Since many of the teens have never slept under the stars before, Cooley teaches them how to pitch the tents and how to choose a campsite that will leave only a tiny footprint after they leave.

 

Cooley is interning with Grand Canyon National Park's immersion programs: Rim to River, Grand Inspiration, and Grand Canyon in Focus.  Throughout the summer, she will spend days at a time camping with youth. She will teach them the basics of cooking in a river kitchen, lead games and teambuilding activities and mentor them in art, photography and seeing Grand Canyon's treasured resources with a mindful eye.

 

"Learning and teaching about this environment is a great way to see another world," Cooley says at the end of her summer internship. "I feel that the park service is doing a lot, from preserving endangered animals/plants to teaching a diverse group of people from around the world how this Grand Canyon's environment came to be."

 

As part of the national park's Youth Intern Program, Cooley applied to the Environmental Education program by submitting her resume and transcripts to the manager. A number of qualities made her a top choice for the internship: participation in the Native American River Guide & Cultural Interpretation course; experience with river trips and backcountry camping; and a passion for art and working with youth.

 

As an intern, Cooley assisted field instructors during overnight immersion programs up to a week long, assisting with logistics as well leading activities for youth during their down time between service learning projects and hikes. Cooley reports that, "At first, I thought [the canyon] just made a pretty tourist spot. After I have lived, worked, and experienced the park service, I now know that it's much more than tourists taking pictures. It is a place full of art and education for everyone...This summer [brought me] a step closer to realizing what I want my career choice to be, and it is inspiring me to be one of those great teachers that I encountered from the summer."

 

Grand Canyon National Park's environmental education programs hire interns - both paid and volunteer - each year. Interns can work with a variety of programs - from school field trips to overnight immersion programs. For more information on working with environmental education at Grand Canyon, you can contact Megan Kohli at 928-638-7683 or megan_kohli@nps.gov For other jobs at Grand Canyon, Mariah Cisse at Mariah_cisse@nps.gov. Opportunities at other amazing park locations are listed at www.studentjobs.gov and www.thesca.org.

HR Corner

New Faces Around CCC

 

Below are the names and faces of the new employees at CCC.
 
If you see them make sure to say hi and introduce your self.
 
Welcome to CCC everyone!

Nancy Harrison
Nancy Harrison- Public Relations Coordinator
 

 Trevor

 

 Trevor Welker- Graphic Design Sr. Specialist

Amanda Bowen
Amanda Bowen-Testing Coordinator
Daniel Virgil
Daniel Vigil-Systems Administrator
Andrea Rapp
Andrea Rapp-User Services Technician
Ken Myers
Ken Myers-FT Faculty Construction and Sustainable Building
Alex Purchase
Alexandra Purchase-Disability Resources Coordinator
Morgan Braggs
Morgan Baggs-Executive Assistant II

 

Jo Holmes Garcia
Alexandra Ruth Holmes-Garcia (Jo) - Administrative Assistant in Advancement

Ashley McAplin
Ashley McAlpin - Public Relations Intern

 


Copyright 2011, Coconino Community College. All Rights Reserved.