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Monday Report
Happy New Year January 2nd 2008


Economic Notes:

THIS WEEKS LEADS:


 

SCORECARD

Travel - Tourism

Salt Lake and Summit Counties represent 67% of the Utah market.

Add Washington and Iron Counties and you have almost 80%.

Transient Room Taxes

RankCounty/City 11/06 - 10/07 Total (000)Market Share (%)
1Salt Lake County$14,38249.47%
2Summit County$5,03517.32%
3Washington County$2,3758.17%
4Iron County$850.62.93%
5Weber County$792.12.72%
6Kane County$579.71.99%
7Wasatch County$541.31.86%
8Uintah County$486.71.67%
9Moab City$443.11.52%
10San Juan County$407.91.40%
11Cache County$321.71.11%
12Sevier County$261.90.90%
13Carbon County$239.60.82%
14Tooele County$231.40.80%
15Garfield County$212.30.73%
16Springdale Town$157.90.54%
17Beaver County$155.30.53%
18Wayne County$151.50.52%
19Box Elder County$133.80.46%
20Layton City$122.80.42%
21Hanksville Town$108.50.37%
22Millard County$98.20.34%
23Ogden City$89.10.31%
24Orem City$82.30.28%
25Midway Town$75.40.26%

Source: Utah State Tax Commission, 12/27/07


The Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Science Part V

  • You may be able to quote Shakespeare, but what are you like on Big Bang theory?
  • The Financial Times gives non-scientifically minded readers a leg up the tree of knowledge.

    Radiation

    • Radiation has become one of the more frightening words in science because it is associated with dangers such as radioactive materials, nuclear accidents and futuristic weapons. Though radiation can be deadly, there is nothing new about it; radiation is ubiquitous and life depends on it.
    • All of the many types of radiation consist of energy travelling through space. Electromagnetic radiation is essentially light waves, which can range in frequency along the ''spectrum'' from radio through visible light down to gamma rays. Particle radiation is made of neutrons, protons or electrons.
    • An important distinction is based on the radiation's energy level. The strongest radiation is known as ''ionising'', because it can create ions by removing electrons from atoms. This includes X-rays, gamma- rays and the subatomic particles emitted by radioactive isotopes as they decay. Less powerful radiation is ''non-ionising''. Although ionising radiation is in principle more dangerous to health than non- ionising radiation, energy level is not the only factor to take into account. Intensity or brightness matters, too. An intense source of non-ionising radiation, such as a powerful laser light source, may be far more hazardous than a lump of radioactive mineral occasionally emitting ionising particles.
      Why does it matter?
    • Technology that uses radiation pervades modern industrial society, from broadcasting to X-ray machines. But fear of radiation is an important reason why some governments are finding it difficult to build new nuclear power stations.
      What next?
    • Medical technology will benefit enormously over the next few years from new ways of using radiation to ''see'' into the human body.
      Fear factor: knocking knees
      What's next? - Atoms and nuclear reactions

      Source: Financial Times, London, 2007


  • Greetings!

    Best Wishes for a prosperous, healthy and happy New Year

    Utah Travel & Tourism

    • Where they are?
    • Who'se got the Market Share?

    The Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Science, Pt V

    Bob Springmeyer

    Bonneville Research


  • Economic Notes:
    • Conference Board Consumer Confidence
    • The Conference Board index of consumer confidence leveled off in December to 88.6 from an upwardly revised 87.8 in November (previously 87.3). This increase puts an end to the string of four consecutive declines in the index, though still remains at a disturbingly low level. A rebound in expectations was the catalyst behind this month's improvement, while sentiment on present conditions deteriorated once again.
    • Durable Goods (Advance)
    • New orders for durable goods rose by a much smaller-than-expected 0.1% in November, following drops in three consecutive months. Durable goods shipments remained the same. Core capital goods orders fell over the month by 0.4%. Inventories and unfilled orders continued to advance.
    • Initial Jobless Claims
    • Initial jobless claims remained relatively flat compared to last week, increasing by only 1,000 to 349,000. Over the last several months though, claims have shown a distinct upward trend indicating some deterioration in the labor market.
    • S&P/Case-Shiller Monthly Home Price Indexes
    • Both the 10-city and 20-city composite S&P/Case- Shiller house price indexes declined 1.4% in October from September. The 10-city composite is down 6.7% over the past year, the largest year-over-year decline since the index began in 1988. The 20-city composite is down 6.1% over the past year. Prices fell in all 20 metro areas in October, and 11 of the 20 metro areas saw their largest year-ago declines ever. House prices continue to fall, with no signs of stabilization.
    • MBA Mortgage Applications Survey
    • Mortgage demand decreased 7.6% in the week ending December 21. Purchase applications decreased 6.6% and refinance applications decreased 8.5%. Mortgage activity remains weak as the housing market downturn is still strongly entrenched and evidence of an end to the correction remains to be seen.
    • Chain Store Sales
    • Chain store sales increased 2.8% in the week ending December 22, double the 1.4% pace set the prior week. Year-over-year growth increased to 2.8%, up from the tepid 2.1% the previous week. The ICSC reported that the fiscal week leading up to Christmas got a boost from last-minute shopping.
    • Oil and Gas Inventories
    • Crude oil inventories fell 3.3 million barrels for the week ending December 21 according to the Energy Information Administration. The drop was much steeper than the 1.3 million barrel decline and marked the sixth consecutive week of falling inventories. Distillate supplies also fell, losing 2.8 million barrels. Gasoline inventories rose, gaining 0.7 million barrels on the week.

    Source: Economy.com 2007

  • THIS WEEKS LEADS:
    • Aaron Brothers Art and Framing
    • Aaron Brothers Art and Framing operates 160 locations throughout AZ, CA, CO, GA, ID, MD, NV, OR, TX, VA and WA.
    • The stores, offering custom- made frames, wall and photo frames, albums, art supplies, prints and wall décor, occupy spaces of 6,500 sq.ft. in power centers.
    • Growth opportunities are sought throughout AZ during the coming 18 months, with representation by Colliers International.
    • The company prefers to locate in power centers anchored by SuperTarget, Wal*Mart Supercenter or regional malls.
    • For more information, contact
      • Tom Woods or Brian Woods, Colliers International,
      • 2390 East Camelback Road, Suite 100,
      • Phoenix, AZ 85016;
      • 602-222-5031/5026,
      • Fax 602-222- 5001;
      • Email: tom.woods@colliers.com or brian.woods@colliers.com;
      • Web site: www.colliers.com/phoenix.
    • Maurices
    • Maurices, Inc. trades as Maurices at 650 locations nationwide.
    • The women's apparel stores occupy spaces of 5,000 sq.ft. in power and strip centers.
    • Plans call for 60 openings nationwide during the coming 18 months.
    • Typical leases run seven years.
    • A vanilla shell is required.
    • Preferred cotenants include Kohl's and Target.
    • Preferred demographics include a population of 50,000 within five miles earning $50,000 as the average household income.
    • For more information, contact
      • Tom Karis,
      • Maurices, Inc.,
      • 105 West Superior Street, Duluth, MN 55802;
      • 218-727-8431 Ext. 2071,
      • Fax 218-720-2138;
      • Email: tkaris@maurices.com;
      • Web site: www.maurices.com.
    • Simple Simon's Pizza
    • J & H Foods trades as Simple Simon's Pizza at 230 locations throughout AL, AR, GA, IA, KS, LA, MO, NM, OK and TX.
    • The pizzerias occupy spaces of 600 sq.ft. to 2,000 sq.ft. in freestanding locations and mixed-use and strip centers.
    • Growth opportunities are sought throughout the Midwest and southwestern regions during the coming 18 months.
    • Typical leases run three years.
    • A vanilla shell is required.
    • Preferred demographics include a population of 2,000 within three miles earning $24,000 as the average household income.
    • Major competitors include Pizza Pro, Gambino's and Pizza Hut.
    • For more information, contact
      • Joe Little,
      • J & H Foods, 6
      • 650 South Lewis Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74136-1040;
      • 918-496-1272,
      • Fax 918-493-6516;
      • Web site: www.simple-simon.com.
    • Country Waffles
    • Country Waffles, Inc. trades as Country Waffles at 36 locations throughout CA and internationally.
    • The restaurants, serving breakfast and lunch, occupy spaces of 3,200 sq.ft. to 3,500 sq.ft. in specialty and strip centers.
    • Growth opportunities are sought throughout CA. Typical leases run 10 years and specific improvements are required.
    • Preferred demographics include a population of 30,000 within three miles earning $50,000 as the average household income.
    • For more information, contact
      • Hervey Brooks,
      • Country Waffles, Inc.,
      • 720 East North Avenue, Suite 108,
      • Fresno, CA 93725;
      • 559- 233-4330,
      • Fax 559-233-4301.
    • MOR furniture
    • MOR furniture for less operates 15 locations throughout AZ, CA, ID, NM, NV, OR and WA.
    • The home furnishing stores prefer to locate in power centers and require a land area of 30,000 sq.ft.
    • Growth opportunities are sought throughout AZ during the coming 18 months, with representation by Colliers International.
    • For more information, contact
      • Tom Woods or Brian Woods,
      • Colliers International,
      • 2390 East
      • Camelback Road, Suite 100, Phoenix, AZ 85016;
      • 602-222-5031/5026,
      • Fax 602-222- 5001; E
      • mail: tom.woods@colliers.com or brian.woods@colliers.com;
      • Web site: www.colliers.com/phoenix.
    • Dickey's Barbeque Pit
    • Dickey's Barbeque Pit operates 64 locations throughout CA, CO, MS, NC, NJ, NM, OR, TN, TX and Canada.
    • The restaurants occupy spaces of 2,000 sq.ft. in endcaps.
    • Growth opportunities are sought nationwide during the coming 18 months.
    • Typical leases run 10 years with two, five-year options.
    • Preferred demographics include a population of 35,000 within three miles earning $50,000 as the average household income.
    • For more information, contact
      • Cullen Dickey,
      • Dickey's Barbeque Pit,
      • 4514 Cole Avenue, Suite 1000,
      • Dallas, TX 75205;
      • 214- 360-9500,
      • Fax 972-248-8667;
      • mail: mweatherspoon@dickeys.com;
      • eb site: www.dickeys.com.

  • BONNEVILLE RESEARCH - Working with clients to deliver results that endure!
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    Bonneville Research is the one firm with the experience and expertise to help businesses, governments and nonprofit organizations solve their toughest problems.

    We work to help clients achieve enduring results and improve the communities in which we live.


    BONNEVILLE RESEARCH

    Bonneville Research is a Utah-based consulting firm providing economic, financial, market and policy research to public and private sector clients throughout the intermountain west.

    Helping Clients Succeed

    Our services include:

    • Financial Analysis
    • Business License Studies
    • Impact Fee analysis
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    • Statistical and Survey Research
    • Public Sector Mission Effectiveness

    Each of our studies is tailored to address the unique needs of our clients and their communities.


    If we can help, please call or email us at

    • Bob
      • 801-364-5300
      • BobSpring@BonnevilleResearch.com
    • Jon
      • 801-746-5706
      • JonSpring@BonnevilleResearch.com

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