Foxhall Internists, PC
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Flu Shots
Cholesterol
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 September 2011
IT'S TIME FOR A FLU SHOT

Seasonal flu is a serious disease that causes illness, hospitalizations and deaths every year in the U.S.

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends that everyone age 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine. This is especially important for health care workers and for persons with frequent infections or chronic health problems. International travelers and caregivers for infants and adults are also strongly encouraged to receive the vaccine.

 

In addition, a pneumococcal vaccine is suggested for people over age 65 and for those with certain health problems. A written order from your doctor is required to receive the pneumococcal vaccine.

 

Influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are now available without an appointment in our flu shot clinic, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (the office is closed from 12 noon to 1 p.m.). The walk-in clinic is located in Suite 304, 3301 New Mexico Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC.  

 

If you have questions, please contact Foxhall Internists at (202) 362-4467.

SEPTEMBER: CHOLESTEROL EDUCATION MONTH

High blood cholesterol affects over 65 million Americans. It is a serious condition that increases your risk for heart disease. The higher your cholesterol level, the greater the risk.

 

It is possible to have high cholesterol and not know it. Lowering cholesterol levels that are too high lessens your risk for developing heart disease and reduces the chance of having a heart attack or dying of heart disease. 

 

"It is very important that everyone know their blood cholesterol level" says Dr. Joshua Yamamoto, who provides cardiology services at Foxhall Internists.

 

More information on cholesterol is available here.

FOXHALL IN THE NEWS
Our physicians are often called upon by the media to provide expert advice on important health issues. 
  • Dr. Assil Saleh was recently interviewed by WTTG-TV/FOX 5 regarding Sjogren's syndrome and U.S. infant mortality rates.